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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    yes can direct wire to a junction box. You mean an electric stove right?


  3. #3
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Stove tops and ovens are usually hard wired.
    Free standing ranges are usually cord and receptacle connected.


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    How about an air compressor?

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Yes, ranges and stove tops can be direct wired, as can dishwashers, etc., however (I did not see this addressed in the posts above) there is no cord and plug which means there is no disconnect, which mean the permanently wired appliance now requires a disconnect - either near the appliance or have a locking device at the breaker which allows for the breaker to be locked off.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    If a panel cover can be locked does that count as being able to lock off a breaker?


  7. #7
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Mohel View Post
    If a panel cover can be locked does that count as being able to lock off a breaker?
    No.

    The individual breaker itself is required to have a lockout device installed on it, a device which is required to remain in place with, or without, a lock installed.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    No.

    The individual breaker itself is required to have a lockout device installed on it, a device which is required to remain in place with, or without, a lock installed.
    Unless the range is within site of the panel. This is the case in a lot of apartments and condos


  9. #9
    Joe Tedesco's Avatar
    Joe Tedesco Guest

    Smile Re: direct wire an oven

    I will add that a cord-and-plug-connected appliance using a separable connector or an attachment plug and receptacle is permitted to serve as the disconnecting means as long as it is accessible.

    For the connection at the rear base of a household electric range that is cord and-plug-connected, an attachment plug and receptacle connection at the rear base of a range, when it is accessible from the front by "removal of a
    drawer", will meet this requirement too.

    The rating of the receptacle or of a separable connector cannot be less than the rating of any appliance connected thereto.

    Be sure to apply the 2008 NEC Table 210.21(B)(3) for receptacle ratings for various size circuits


  10. #10
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Quote Originally Posted by ken horak View Post
    Unless the range is within site of the panel. This is the case in a lot of apartments and condos
    Ken,

    In which case it would not need to be locked at all. Unless ... the panel was around the end wall from the range and not "straight line sight" - as many were installed in apartments and condos where the end of the kitchen counter had a full height wall, with the panel in it on the other side or in the wall opposite it. Yes, may apartments and condos have a small "eat-in" kitchen with the panel in the wall where the table was to go (which, of course, was a code violation in and of itself ).

    The question was about locking the entire cover instead of a single breaker.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Jerry-
    My post was an addition to your 2 post's stating a locking device was needed on the circuit breaker.Nothing to do with the cover being lockable.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Quote Originally Posted by ken horak View Post
    Jerry-
    My post was an addition to your 2 post's stating a locking device was needed on the circuit breaker.Nothing to do with the cover being lockable.
    Oh ... oops.

    I was just going based on the one you quoted and referred to.



    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  13. #13
    Ian Currie's Avatar
    Ian Currie Guest

    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    How about an air compressor?
    John, although your question may have been rhetorical, it brings up a good point.

    In my neck of the woods (I presume throughout all of North America as well) it is not permitted to cut a plug off the end of any electrical component so the component can be hardwired to the electrical system. You see that done here quite often with 240 volt construction heaters.

    So my question is, was the range designed to be hardwired or did someone cut the plug off so that it could be hardwired? If it was the latter, then the installation is not code compliant.


  14. #14
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    Default Re: direct wire an oven

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Currie View Post
    In my neck of the woods (I presume throughout all of North America as well) it is not permitted to cut a plug off the end of any electrical component so the component can be hardwired to the electrical system.
    That is not allowed by the NEC either.

    So my question is, was the range designed to be hardwired or did someone cut the plug off so that it could be hardwired? If it was the latter, then the installation is not code compliant.
    Most ranges are designed to be installed either way, with a cord and plug or permanently wired. Which, of course, does not mean using a cord and cutting the plug off the end of it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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