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Thread: gfci switch

  1. #1
    Daniel John's Avatar
    Daniel John Guest

    Default gfci switch

    I put a can light above a shower in an bathroom addition to a commercial property. The can light is labeled for wet locations. its ran to the switch with corrigated 12ga wire. the inspector told me it needs to be connected to a ground fault switch... is there such a thing? if not could I just have a dedicated line for it.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: gfci switch

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel John View Post
    I put a can light above a shower in an bathroom addition to a commercial property. The can light is labeled for wet locations. its ran to the switch with corrigated 12ga wire. the inspector told me it needs to be connected to a ground fault switch... is there such a thing? if not could I just have a dedicated line for it.
    Yep, if the AHJ said it needs to be GFCI protected then it does! Don't make the inspector mad, it is bad Ju Ju!

    In my area all lights above the shower/tub must be on a GFCI, the type of fixture does not matter. Yet, in the town of Brentwood, TN. a few miles up the road they do not require it.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
    chris mcintyre Guest

    Default Re: gfci switch

    Daniel,
    I have never heard of a GFCI switch, probably just a misunderstanding, also remember that you must use a waterproof trim.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: gfci switch

    I'm sure the AHJ was referring to a switch that is protected by GFCI. Usually the same GFCI that protects the rest of the bath outlets.


  5. #5
    Daniel John's Avatar
    Daniel John Guest

    Default Re: gfci switch

    I'm sure the AHJ was referring to a switch that is protected by GFCI. Usually the same GFCI that protects the rest of the bath outlets.
    So can two gfci outlets be on the same circuit as the light in the shower? If so should I run the power from the gfci to the switch?


  6. #6
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    Default Re: gfci switch

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel John View Post
    So can two gfci outlets be on the same circuit as the light in the shower? If so should I run the power from the gfci to the switch?
    The answer is yes is my area, but best to check with your local authority. Yesterday's condo - the GFCI in the main bath wall outlet supplies both outlets, both exhaust fans and all lighting in 2 bathrooms.

    You can also buy a GFCI breaker unit that has no receptacles, just the test and reset buttons. I've seen them used on the side of jacuzzi tubs. Shouldn't need that in your job, but ask first.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: gfci switch


  8. #8
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    Default Re: gfci switch

    This sounds way too much like giving construction/electrical advice to a non licensed individual. It's illegal to work on anything but your own property unless licensed in most places.


  9. #9
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
    chris mcintyre Guest

    Default Re: gfci switch

    Quote Originally Posted by paul hardy View Post
    Paul,
    This is a 'blank GFCI receptacle', I know it says switch, but surely this is not a switch? I think what you are calling the on/off is actually test/reset.

    I would think a GFCI disconnect would be a closer description than a switch.

    I could be wrong, but I am sure someone will clear this up for us.


  10. #10
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
    Richard Pultar Guest

    Default Re: gfci switch

    working on electric ,not in your own house, and not knowing what to do.
    get a electrician


  11. #11
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    On The Mason-Dixon Line
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    Default Re: gfci switch

    [quote=John Kogel;109723] the GFCI in the main bath wall outlet supplies both outlets, both exhaust fans and all lighting in 2 bathrooms.
    quote]

    This is not allowed under The NEC. The way the NEC is written a 20 ampere circuit can feed the receptacles in more then 1 bathroom, as long as that is all that is on the circuit - The bathroom Receptacles. If one was to put an exhaust fan, lights and the receptacle one the same circuit, then you need a separate circuit for each bathroom.

    2008 NEC - Article 210.11(C)(3)- Bathroom Branch Circuits: In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section,at least one 20- ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply bathroom receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall have no other outlets.

    Exception: Where the 20 - ampere circuit supplies a single bathroom, outlets for other equipment with in the same bathroom shall be permitted to be supplied in accordance with 210.23(A)(1) and (A)(2).


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