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  1. #1
    matt larson's Avatar
    matt larson Guest

    Default Recessed lighting wiring

    I'm finishing my basement and considering installing some recessed lights in the unfinished ceiling before I install dry wall.

    Currently there is one light in the middle of the room that is on a switch. I'm thinking that to install four lights, I will be able to disconnect the current overhead light and re-run one of the wires to the first new light. From there, I would run wire to the next, and then to the third and forth. At the forth, I would take the second wire that is attached to the current overhead light and connect that to the forth new light as well, completing the circuit.

    I know that I cannot have a junction box installed behind drywall, but if all of the connections are made inside of the light fixture, I would assume that is the correct way to do it.

    A few other things I'm thinking:
    -Since I'll be adding insulation to the ceiling, I'll want IC rated lights.
    -For an 8' ceiling I'll be placing lights about 8' apart.
    -I will not be placing lights under the joists with the gas line, because I'm concerned about heat build up.

    I've changed several light fixtures in the past, and this seems like a similar process except I'm running new wire to the fixtures instead of just replacing the fixture. If that's the case, I feel confident I can do this upgrade myself.

    Please let me know if what I am planning sounds like the correct/safe way to go about this. Also, if you can think of anything I am missing or can recommend some websites to check out, I would appreciate it.


    Thanks in advance

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  2. #2
    M. Slusar's Avatar
    M. Slusar Guest

    Default Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    I think you need to look into parallel vs series circuits...
    Just a plumber here, but I encourage you to get someone qualified to at least look at your install before sealing it up. Sounds like you could use the help...


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    Matt
    From what is written, you don't seem to have the knowledge for this.
    Improperly done, you will end up tearing it all out latter.
    Plus a mistake on this could cost you more than money.
    I recommend you have a licensed professional do the work.
    Be sure to get all necessary permits.
    I believe many others here will give similar advice.
    Thank you for coming to IN for advice

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  4. #4
    matt larson's Avatar
    matt larson Guest

    Default Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    OK, I am convinced! Sounds like I should call a pro for this part. Thanks or the quick replies.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Manchester, Vermont
    Posts
    298

    Cool Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    Matt Larson

    In your post you make it sound like your going to run jus a single insulated
    conductor to your recess lights with the ground and grounding conductor
    run with the hot insulated conductor.

    The guys are right, you should talk to a pro/electrician. You may found
    one that can work with a DIY homeowner and will give you pointers.

    Well good luck with your project.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    N. Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    36

    Default Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    Matt: If there are two wires at the junction box for the existing light in the basement, there are a number of possibilities about this circuit.
    1). The light has a feed wire and a switch leg. One of the wires carries
    the line in (the feed) and the other goes back and forth from the switch.
    2). The light does not have a feed wire, but there is another light (or device) on the same switch. That means one wire comes from the switch and one goes to the next load.
    3). The light is through wired. This would normally only be true if one of the wires carried an extra conductor in it (14/3 or 12/3), meaning there is an unswitched leg that continues past the light.
    In order to use the existing switch on 4 fixtures, you have to determine what those two wires are. If you simply daisy chain the wires you will probably end up with a dead short. It is possible to do what you are trying to do, but not just by connecting black to black and white to white. I hope this helped.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by matt larson View Post
    I will be able to disconnect the current overhead light and re-run one of the wires to the first new light. From there, I would run wire to the next, and then to the third and forth. At the forth, I would take the second wire that is attached to the current overhead light and connect that to the forth new light as well, completing the circuit.
    Very wrong.

    As others have said, get someone who knows to do it for you.

    It really is a simply wiring layout you are looking for, but absolutely NOT as you described.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: Recessed lighting wiring

    Matt, If there is only one cable running to the light fixture in your unfinished basement, it is as simple installation.
    If in fact there are more than just one cable to the light fixture, as Mike stated, then more help is needed.

    Some notes: If there it more than one cable and/or the cable will not reach to your first Recess, U can install an extension ring on the existing outlet to flush with the finish drywall and blank it off (accessible).
    Not all Recess fixtures are rated for 'feed-thru' as in a daisy chain installation.

    Regardless of the situation here, by having a licensed electrician give the pointers U need, don't fear this installation. After the inspections are done (rough & finish) it will be done correct.
    Bob Smit, County EI


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