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  1. #1
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    Default Panel on ceiling

    Anyone know the NEC # for a panel located on ceiling. Thanks.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Not allowed like that.

    They were only tested and listed to be installed vertically on a vertical surface (such as a wall, support stand, etc.). That is how they were tested for heat rise, ability to dissipate heat, breakers staying in place, and all the other factors which could affect a panel installed horizontally face down like that, not to mention what could unexpectedly fall out into your face and be energized, resulting a not real pretty sight.

    I've seen a few installed like that and have written them all up for correction.

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  3. #3
    dana1028's Avatar
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    NEC 240.24(A) also requires the circuit breaker [center of the grip] be not more than 6'7" above the floor.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by dana1028 View Post
    NEC 240.24(A) also requires the circuit breaker [center of the grip] be not more than 6'7" above the floor.

    If it is not secured in well ... that may not be something to worry about as it could very well be in your lap (or however long the conductors allow it to drop down).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Lets try this one on for size:

    Nec article 240.33

    Enclosures for overcurrent devices shall be mounted in a vertical position unless that is shown to be impracticable. Circuit breaker enclosures shall be permitted to be installed horizontally where the circuit breaker is installed in accordance with 240.81. Listed busway plug-in units shall be permitted to be mounted in orientations corresponding to the busway mounting position


  6. #6
    John Steinke's Avatar
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Sometimes appearances alone are not enough to explain things.

    I suspect that is not a 'panel' as much as a 'disconnecting means.' As such, there's no code, or even 'trade practice,' issue, assuming that the placement of the disconnect makes sense as compared to the location of whatever is being disconnected. That is, what might appear to be a bad placement might make perfect sense once you place yourself in a position to service the equipment.

    In that regard, context is everything. For example, a disconnect for the HVAC equipment located above a suspended ceiling might also be above the ceiling, near the equipment. The "handle height rule" would not be applied in that circumstance.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by ken horak View Post
    Lets try this one on for size:

    Nec article 240.33

    Enclosures for overcurrent devices shall be mounted in a vertical position unless that is shown to be impracticable. Circuit breaker enclosures shall be permitted to be installed horizontally where the circuit breaker is installed in accordance with 240.81. Listed busway plug-in units shall be permitted to be mounted in orientations corresponding to the busway mounting position
    Ken,

    That is allowing the panel to be installed on a wall "horizontally" instead of vertically IF the enclosure is listed for it and the breakers meet the indicating requirements of 240.81.

    That does not, however, address installing it horizontally on a ceiling.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by John Steinke View Post
    I suspect that is not a 'panel' as much as a 'disconnecting means.'
    If you look closely you will see that it is: a) 4 half-wide breakers; b) 2 tandem breakers; c) a quad breaker, which means it is a "panel" and must be installed as panels and overcurrent protection are required to be installed.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    It is just as Jerry described, a panel with 4 breakers.

    Tom Rees / A Closer Look Home Inspection / Salt Lake City, Utah

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Picture.

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  11. #11
    dana1028's Avatar
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by John Steinke View Post
    I suspect that is not a 'panel' as much as a 'disconnecting means.' As such, there's no code, or even 'trade practice,' issue, assuming that the placement of the disconnect makes sense as compared to the location of whatever is being disconnected.
    ?? John - I don't know where you get your 'trade practices' information, but all the previous code sections mentioned in Art. 240 are overcurrent protection [as in breakers] rules, not panel rules.

    BTW - you are correct, there is no code prohibiting a panel from being installed horizontal, upside-down, etc., but if you choose to install breakers in that panel then Art. 240 prohibits such for the breakers.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Panel on ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by dana1028 View Post
    BTW - you are correct, there is no code prohibiting a panel from being installed horizontal, upside-down, etc.,

    There is - 110.3(B) does not allow it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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