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  1. #1
    Ed DeRousse's Avatar
    Ed DeRousse Guest

    Default Shed Electricity

    What are the rules on electricity in the backyard shed? I know that having a panel in the shed is not always a requirement, but it seems to me that there should be atleast a gfci in the shed. And when would a panel/ sub-panel be required in the shed?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
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    3,746

    Default Re: Shed Electricity

    Think of a storage building as a garage.
    Yes, GFCI is required.
    A panel is not required, but if there are several circuits having a panel is preferred.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,898

    Default Re: Shed Electricity

    Like RC said, GFI protection is required for the receptacles.

    If the building is served by a single circuit a switch can serve as the disconnect. If more than 2 circuits are in the shed a panel would be used to disconnect.


  4. #4
    Ed DeRousse's Avatar
    Ed DeRousse Guest

    Default Re: Shed Electricity

    Thank you for the info! Appreciated!


  5. #5
    John Sims's Avatar
    John Sims Guest

    Default Re: Shed Electricity

    I had electricity run to my shed by a state licensed electrician.He insisted the wires be buried in conduit 18 inches underground.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,248

    Default Re: Shed Electricity

    Quote Originally Posted by John Sims View Post
    I had electricity run to my shed by a state licensed electrician.He insisted the wires be buried in conduit 18 inches underground.
    He probably ran PVC, right?

    The burial depths depends on what is being buried:
    minimum depth - what is being buried
    24" - direct burial cables
    6" - rigid or intermediate metal conduit
    18" - non-metallic listed for direct burial without being under concrete
    12" - residential branch circuits 15 amp or 20 amp / 120 volts with GFCI protection

    Now, if those items are buried under 2" of concrete for protection from above:
    18" - direct burial cables
    6" - rigid or intermediate metal conduit
    12" - non-metallic listed for direct burial without being under concrete
    6" - residential branch circuits 15 amp or 20 amp / 120 volts with GFCI protection

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    John Steinke's Avatar
    John Steinke Guest

    Default Re: Shed Electricity

    Running power to a shed always brings up a variety of issues. First and foremost, the presence of power often results in a requirement for a permit.

    As to the 'electrician insisting' on something: you pay the man for his training, experience, and judgement. This may not be the same as 'code minimum.' Listen to the man- you might learn something.

    One reason is that sheds, just like enclosed proches, have a habit of 'growing.' Whether simple circumstance, or deliberate deceit, those are exactly the types of situations where future use is likely to be very different from the project as originally proposed.


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