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  1. #1
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    Default Surge Protectors

    So how does this thing work? It was connected to a 20 amp 240 volt breaker. There were two wires from the breaker traveling to a device clamped on the neutral, and two wires traveling down to this unit.

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    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Robinson View Post
    So how does this thing work? It was connected to a 20 amp 240 volt breaker. There were two wires from the breaker traveling to a device clamped on the neutral, and two wires traveling down to this unit.
    It draws off the bad mojo while you're watching it, and then it bleeds it off when you walk away.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    That was kind of the feeling I was getting. It was part of an X-10 wire system that didn't appear to be in use any longer anyhow, as far as I could tell. Probably why I've only seen a couple of surge protectors in the last eight yers.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  4. #4
    Peter Gilvarry's Avatar
    Peter Gilvarry Guest

    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Did it say Surge Protector on the unit, your picture is not clear.

    If you suspect they had X-10 devices it could be a phase coupler to allow the signals to travel from one phase to the other.

    As to the coment about whole house surge protectors, any proof or just another rumor that is insubstantiated.

    A whole house surge protector is more use than the $4.99 power strip you get a Walmart.

    Why would a HI get involved in this device, is it causing the house to burn down? Too many HIs in this forum consider themselves code inspectors!


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Quote Originally Posted by fritzkelly View Post




    In the most common type of surge protector, a component called a metal oxide varistor, or MOV, diverts the extra voltage. An MOV forms a connection between the hot power line and the grounding line. An MOV has three parts: a piece of metal oxide material in the middle, joined to the power and grounding line by two semiconductors. These semiconductors have a variable resistance that is dependent on voltage. When voltage is below a certain level, the electrons in the semiconductors flow in such a way as to create a very high resistance. When the voltage exceeds that level, the electrons behave differently, creating a much lower resistance. When the voltage is correct, an MOV does nothing. When voltage is too high, an MOV can conduct a lot of current to eliminate the extra voltage. So surge protectors work according to the above process and helps to protect your all your electronic equipment. Hence Surge-Protectors.org will help you as a guide for surge protector usage and even buying guide.
    I'd like to add that the MOV may receive a few shots that cause to to act. This actually causes the MOV to become fatigued any reduces its ability to respond to high surges.

    Many manufacturers understand this fatiguing situation and indicate the unit should be replaced every few years or so. Have have seen this interval from 2 years to 20 years depending upon the produce.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Why would a HI get involved in this device, is it causing the house to burn down? Too many HIs in this forum consider themselves code inspectors![/quote]

    Geez, lighten up. Yes it said Surge Protector on the unit. My client wanted to know what it was and what it did. I didn't mention anything about code.

    AD, I have Google also. That doesn't mention anything about how it works, just a wiring diagram. I thought someone might know how the thing functioned and what the theory is behind it.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  7. #7
    Gary Goetz's Avatar
    Gary Goetz Guest

    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    We used to sell this type of surge protection. In large electrical installs especially with underground runs between buildings (we used to sell a lot of campground electrical supplies) These things work. Several of my customers would loose well pumps and other big motors multiple times a year during lightning storms. Put these in and those failures ended. We never experienced any of the units dying but I suppose they do under a direct lightning strike to the system. My take is that lightning strikes of trees near where wires are buried could cause huge voltage spikes in the wires. I used them in my own system which was also prone to lightning damage. Except for the phone and computer networks which had their own buried wires, it cut lightning damage to equipment.
    p.s. you want to see a disaster, cut off all the water to 200 campers on a holiday weekend.

    LA-302-R

    Last edited by Gary Goetz; 06-18-2010 at 07:47 AM.

  8. #8
    Gary Goetz's Avatar
    Gary Goetz Guest

    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    My meager understanding of this type device is that it is three? pieces of foil wound in a spiral separated by insulators that would pass higher voltages but retain it's insulating quality at design voltage.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    One thing to check visually on these is that they are connected to a dedicated breaker, I have seen one connected to an breaker also powering a 240V branch circuit, presumably because the all breaker positions were already in use when it was installed.

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  10. #10
    Gary Goetz's Avatar
    Gary Goetz Guest

    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Only an inspector......... I would stick em on any ole double pole breaker in the panel. But I didn't have some jerk water inspector breathing down my neck either.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    I see the installation instructions for AD's surge unit dont require a dedicated breaker but at the same time seem to indicate it is OK to double tap the breaker connection.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    "Dedicated" was poor wording on my part, the issue is: is it correct to double tap the breaker?

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  13. #13
    Philip's Avatar
    Philip Guest

    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Isn't Square D the only manufactuer that makes a double tap possible in one of their boxes Any other double tap is wrong.


  14. #14
    Gary Goetz's Avatar
    Gary Goetz Guest

    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    No doubt I will get chapter and verse on this But the larger double poles have a wire connection method that will hold the second wire ( stranded 12 or 14 gauge IIRC) in addition to the wire for the the intended load. I guess I would want to attach this to a breaker that was 30 amp or above which (again IIRC) have the heavier connection method intended for bigger gauges of stranded wire. Use common sense and be sure the breaker has room to hold both wires and can clamp them tightly? Alas, that's just me, sigh.........


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Surge Protectors

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Isn't Square D the only manufactuer that makes a double tap possible in one of their boxes Any other double tap is wrong.
    Cutler-Hammer also has breakers that are listed to accept two conductors.


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