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  1. #1
    brianmiller's Avatar
    brianmiller Guest

    Default Washer Outlet location

    The washer outlet is located 6" from a sink.

    Should it be required to be GFCI protected? Or because it's for the washer, it is exempt?

    Thanks as always,

    Brian

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  2. #2
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    It looks like it does per the code section below:



    210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for
    Personnel.
    FPN: See 215.9 for ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection
    for personnel on feeders.
    (A) Dwelling Units.
    All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and
    20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in
    (1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter
    protection for personnel.
    (1) Bathrooms
    (2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor
    located at or below grade level not intended as habitable
    rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas,
    and areas of similar use
    (3) Outdoors

    Exception to (3): Receptacles that are not readily accessible
    and are supplied by a dedicated branch circuit for
    electric snow-melting or deicing equipment shall be permitted
    to be installed in accordance with 426.28.
    (4) Crawl spaces at or below grade level
    (5) Unfinished basements for purposes of this section,
    unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of
    the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited
    to storage areas, work areas, and the like
    Exception to (5): A receptacle supplying only a permanently
    installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system shall
    not be required to have ground-fault circuit-interrupter
    protection.
    FPN: See 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) for power supply
    requirements for fire alarm systems.
    Receptacles installed under the exception to
    210.8(A)(5) shall not be considered as meeting the
    requirements of 210.52(G).
    (6) Kitchens where the receptacles are installed to serve
    the countertop surfaces
    (7) Laundry, utility, and wet bar sinks where the receptacles
    are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside
    edge of the sink
    (8) Boathouses



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Maryland
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    1,898

    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    The Code Article posted above is either from the 05 or 08 edition which started to require the GFI protection for the laundry circuit within 6' of the sink. Before that there was no requirement for the GFI protection.


  4. #4
    James Duffin's Avatar
    James Duffin Guest

    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    It was from the 08 code.


  5. #5
    brianmiller's Avatar
    brianmiller Guest

    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    That's what I thought, but wouldn't you get nuisance tripping of the GFCI if the washer is plugged into a GFCI?


  6. #6
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    Quote Originally Posted by brianmiller View Post
    That's what I thought, but wouldn't you get nuisance tripping of the GFCI if the washer is plugged into a GFCI?
    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    Not if the receptacle is properly rated and newly minted.
    I was not the GFCI devices which caused the "nuisance" tripping, it was the older appliances which caused the "real" tripping as the older appliances were manufactured to a standard which allowed for higher leakage currents, and it was those allowable higher leakage currents which would "really" cause the GFCI to trip - those were not "nuisance" trippings, those were really telling you there was excessive leakage in those appliances ... just no one want to believe it or understand it ... the GFCI device WAS "doing its job" as it was designed, intended, and installed to do.

    The only "nuisance" thing about it was that tingling feeling you would get from touching the appliances and ground or something wet and ground.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    I was not the GFCI devices which caused the "nuisance" tripping, it was the older appliances which caused the "real" tripping as the older appliances were manufactured to a standard which allowed for higher leakage currents, and it was those allowable higher leakage currents which would "really" cause the GFCI to trip - those were not "nuisance" trippings, those were really telling you there was excessive leakage in those appliances ... just no one want to believe it or understand it ... the GFCI device WAS "doing its job" as it was designed, intended, and installed to do.


    I had that happen to me on a house I'm am remodeling to rent.
    Every time the Fridge was plugged in, it tripped the GFCI.
    It's was not the GFCI but the Fridge that was at fault.
    Through the Fridge away, kept the GFCI.
    The GFCI was doing exactly what it is intended to do, protect me from electrical shock.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  8. #8
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    Cool Re: Washer Outlet location

    J.P. I was wonder if you could share with us, in what year did appliance
    MFG. up the the standard with leakage current, So they could be plug
    into a GFCI outlet, without tripping it.

    I do like the way you explained nuisance tripping.

    Last edited by Robert Mattison; 07-23-2010 at 02:52 PM. Reason: typo

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Washer Outlet location

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Mattison View Post
    J.P. I was wonder if you could share with us, in what year did appliance
    MFG. up the the standard with leakage current, So they could be plug
    into a GFCI outlet, without tripping it.

    I do like the way you explained nuisance tripping.
    It was a revision to the UL standard, I believe it was in the late 1980s or in the 1990s. The leakage current used to be allowed at less than 50 ma, the new standard is less than 0.5 ma, which is 1/10 of the GFCI trip point.

    If the GFCI trips, there is a problem with the appliance - unless it is REAL OLD, in which case it is most likely time to replace the appliance anyway .

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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