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  1. #1
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    Apr 2009
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    Cool professional gas/electric stove in homes

    This question may had be ask and answer before. But going to ask it.

    I understand, that under the NEC 2005 CODE, electric stove, with a cord
    set, plug into a male receptacle behind the range was okay so long as
    you could pull out the bottom draw, and you reach in to un-plug the
    range.

    The new professional come wirh a gas top, electric oven, with the a broilier
    where the pot and pan went into the bottom drawn.

    Can some please explain if this installation is acceptable under the
    2005 NEC CODE BOOK as well as the 2008 NEC CODE BOOK. Thanks.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    4,086

    Default Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Mattison View Post
    This question may had be ask and answer before. But going to ask it.

    I understand, that under the NEC 2005 CODE, electric stove, with a cord
    set, plug into a male receptacle behind the range was okay so long as
    you could pull out the bottom draw, and you reach in to un-plug the
    range.

    The new professional come wirh a gas top, electric oven, with the a broilier
    where the pot and pan went into the bottom drawn.

    Can some please explain if this installation is acceptable under the
    2005 NEC CODE BOOK as well as the 2008 NEC CODE BOOK. Thanks.
    I'm honestly not sure what you mean by "professional" stoves.

    I *think* you are referring to dual-fuel ranges.

    That being said, where the confusion on this end lay is if you mean a commercial or one listed for residential.

    The standards for residential are different than for commercial appliances.

    I am of the opinion that a commercial listed appliance which is not LISTED for residential use (and listed to meet residential Standards) should not be installed in a residential dwelling occupancy.

    Any installation must heed the Listed instructions for the appliance (that's a requirement of the code from Article 110).

    As to the specifics of a compliant installation, the NEC is quite clear about the exception to the accessibility of the cord-and-plug connection. If the installation cannot be accomplished to meet that exception, then an alternate means which is compliant must be utilized.

    Some terms, such as accessible are defined in Artlcle 100. Some terms which require further definition specific to the application of an article are further defined at the begining of an article.

    HTH


  3. #3
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    Manchester, Vermont
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    Cool Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    Thanks H.G. for your very thoughtful reply. Robert

    Now I will check will the local appliance dealers, about these stoves.


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,252

    Default Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    I'm honestly not sure what you mean by "professional" stoves.
    The term "professional" came into being when up-scale buyers started installing "commercial" units in their kitchens, which is expressly prohibited by the code, so those "commercial" units were not allowed. The marketing team solved that problem by re-labeling them as "professional" units and eliminating the 'commercial" term from both the units and the listing to which the units were listed and labeled.

    That being said, where the confusion on this end lay is if you mean a commercial or one listed for residential.

    The standards for residential are different than for commercial appliances.

    I am of the opinion that a commercial listed appliance which is not LISTED for residential use (and listed to meet residential Standards) should not be installed in a residential dwelling occupancy.

    H. G. is quite correct on the above.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    John Steinke's Avatar
    John Steinke Guest

    Default Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    Finding a 'commercial' range in a home I rate on the same level as finding a man in a skirt - it may actually violate the fine print of the law, but I'm not going to call 911 over it.

    Part of the reason is that it can be hard to tell a 'skirt' from a 'kilt.' That is, there isn't always a clear difference in appearance between a 'commercial' and 'residential' range. This has especially become an issue with a multitude of 'residential ranges with professional features / styling" on the market.

    Nor is it impossible for an appliance to be listed for both uses. The only difference between the listings is that residential models have their face temperatures monitored during testing, while the commercial ones do not

    Also note that the code rule applies only to some kitchen equipment. "Commercial" water heaters and laundry equipment do not have this issue. Or, for that matter, "commercial" microwaves and blenders.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Manchester, Vermont
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    Cool Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    Thanks J.P and J.S. for your replies. I apppeciate them. Robert


  7. #7
    erika krieger's Avatar
    erika krieger Guest

    Default Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    from the IRC:

    §RG2447.2 (§FG623.2) Prohibited location. Cooking appliances designed, tested, listed and labeled for use in commercial occupancies shall not be installed within dwelling units or within any area where domestic cooking operations occur.


    ------------------------------
    from the Commmentary:

    Commercial cooking appliances are tested and labeled to different standards than those listed for domestic use. Commercial cooking appliances generally are not insulated to the same level as domestic
    cooking appliances, have higher surface operating temperatures than domestic appliances, and require a much greater clearance to combustible material. The safety measures inherent to household cooking appliances, such as child-safe push-to-turn knobs and insulated oven doors, are not usually provided in commercial cooking appliances.
    Commercial cooking appliances also have a greater ventilation air requirement for safe operation than household-type cooking appliances. As such, installation of commercial-type cooking appliances in dwell-
    ings is prohibited.

    Cooking appliances used in dwelling units or in areas where domestic cooking operations occur require a greater degree of user protection and as such must be listed and labeled as household-type appliances for
    domestic use..... To satisfy residential consumer demand for commercial appliances in the home, some manufacturers are producing listed household-type appliances that have the appearance of commercial application cooking appliances.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    Default Re: professional gas/electric stove in homes

    Quote Originally Posted by John Steinke View Post
    Finding a 'commercial' range in a home I rate on the same level as finding a man in a skirt - it may actually violate the fine print of the law, but I'm not going to call 911 over it.

    Part of the reason is that it can be hard to tell a 'skirt' from a 'kilt.' That is, there isn't always a clear difference in appearance between a 'commercial' and 'residential' range. This has especially become an issue with a multitude of 'residential ranges with professional features / styling" on the market.

    Nor is it impossible for an appliance to be listed for both uses. The only difference between the listings is that residential models have their face temperatures monitored during testing, while the commercial ones do not

    Also note that the code rule applies only to some kitchen equipment. "Commercial" water heaters and laundry equipment do not have this issue. Or, for that matter, "commercial" microwaves and blenders.
    I disagree. The standards and listings for dishwashers, washing machines, dryers, and many other "commercial" appliances are distinctly different than those which are LISTED for RESIDENTIAL.

    The differences between the STANDARDS for a LISTED COMMERCIAL range/stove and a listed residential range are SIGNIFICANTLY MORE INVOLVED than JUST FACE TEMPERATURES.

    You will find DIFFERENT Category Codes for a NUMBER of Appliances Commercial vs. Residential in the UL White Book. Including Disposers, Dishwashers (for example in residential require a safety interlock on the door, lower sanitizing max temps), etc.

    Commercial Washing Machines for example oftentimes require external check valves, where residential ones do not.

    I repeat, I am of the opinion, that unless said "commercial" appliance is LISTED FOR RESIDENTIAL USE, it should NOT BE INSTALLED in a RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCY.

    That being said, my reply earlier was regarding the Original Post/TOPIC & TITLE of the post string, i.e. "professional gas/electric stove in homes".


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