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Thread: Touch-Plate

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Greenville, N.C.
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    254

    Default Touch-Plate

    I'm starting a new thread 'cause that last one made my eyes hurt. This group has some wild cats in it for sure.
    I inspected a 60 year old house today with a Touch-Plate system. (low-voltage light switching) I understand the basic operation, but does anyone know of any inherent long term problems or advice I can give my client? In this house, all the panels were neat and clean. All the switches operated very well. I just want to guide my client efficiently.

    Thanks in advance

    JLMathis

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Touch-Plate

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey L. Mathis View Post
    I'm starting a new thread 'cause that last one made my eyes hurt. This group has some wild cats in it for sure.
    I inspected a 60 year old house today with a Touch-Plate system. (low-voltage light switching) I understand the basic operation, but does anyone know of any inherent long term problems or advice I can give my client? In this house, all the panels were neat and clean. All the switches operated very well. I just want to guide my client efficiently.

    Thanks in advance

    JLMathis
    Is this an old 60 year old system or a more modern version?

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: Touch-Plate

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey L. Mathis View Post
    I inspected a 60 year old house today with a Touch-Plate system. (low-voltage light switching) I understand the basic operation, but does anyone know of any inherent long term problems or advice I can give my client?
    If the low voltage lighting system was installed more than 10-15 years ago, then getting parts can become a real problem.

    I installed several of those systems back in the mid-1960s working for my Dad, an electrical contractor, and by the 1980s (working for another electrical contractor) parts were getting hard to find for them.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Greenville, N.C.
    Posts
    254

    Default Re: Touch-Plate

    Thanks, it is original to the house. 1960.
    JLMathis


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    1,984

    Default Re: Touch-Plate

    Any low voltage system, unless it is produced by a major lighting manufacturer, I advise my clients that parts may be hard or impossible to get. Transformers are no big deal since all you really have to do is match the output voltage. Compatible fixtures, controllers, specialty switches, etc can be an issue.
    Any low voltage, especially in NC and kitchens I try to find the transformer. Amazing how often I can't find it. In NC especially they love to bury those things behind the cabinets, inside a wall that was supposed to have an access panel, or in the ceiling behind a blank receptacle box cover that the transformer will never fit through.

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    930

    Default Re: Touch-Plate

    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Keller View Post
    Any low voltage system, unless it is produced by a major lighting manufacturer, I advise my clients that parts may be hard or impossible to get. Transformers are no big deal since all you really have to do is match the output voltage. Compatible fixtures, controllers, specialty switches, etc can be an issue.
    Any low voltage, especially in NC and kitchens I try to find the transformer. Amazing how often I can't find it. In NC especially they love to bury those things behind the cabinets, inside a wall that was supposed to have an access panel, or in the ceiling behind a blank receptacle box cover that the transformer will never fit through.
    So true.
    Every time I see those Halogen puck lights I wonder where the transformer is located and what type of connection is being made from 110v to the transformer.


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