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  1. #1
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    Default Energysaver 1800

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    I was sent this link and am interested in what you guys think?

    Particularly the "how it works" section. I'm told this is big stuff in Europe and something similar is even required by code in some areas... Scotland I think was one.

    Anyway, if nothing else, it's an interesting concept.

    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    Snake oil.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Waterloo, Ontario
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    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    Probably power factor correction capacitors. They are used in industrial applications where they get billed extra for a poor power factor.

    I don't think a residential meter is even capable of measuring power factor (maybe the new ones are?).


  4. #4
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    Mar 2007
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    New Mexico
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    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    I think they used to sell magnets that you could place on your fuel line and increase your mileage by 70%,

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  5. #5
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
    Darrel Hood Guest

    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    There is a distributor for these in my area, and I am beginning to be asked an occasional question about them by clients. My gut says they are just another black box gimmick. But they do have a history of success in industrial applications. I would really like to know more about if they work in residences so I can be more helpful to my clients. Does anybody have useful experience or information about these devices?

    Thanks,

    Darrel Hood
    DILIGENT PROPERTY SERVICES


  6. #6
    Tony Cole's Avatar
    Tony Cole Guest

    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    Just a box of capacitors. Power factor correction in homes is useless. Utilities do not charge for poor power factor in residential meters. The assumption is that residential loads are so close to unity that the higer priced meters capable of power factor and demand measurements are not worth the return. The idea has been tossed around with the new smart meter technology to look into charging for poor power factor, but as of yet, I haven't heard of a utility doing so.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Elmont, NY
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    22

    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    I agree. Sounds like a Power Factor Correction Capacitor. Not valuable on a residential meter.

    I have had this debate with many salesmen. Their website describes "watts" and infers that watts will be reduced. In reality, watts are not changed by a power factor correction capacitor. They only affect (lower) VAR's or reactive power, which overheats the generator and is a problem for the utility, but not readable by most meters which only see watts over time.


  8. #8
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    Mar 2008
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    Charlotte NC
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    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    As I remember it, the residential power meter turns by eddy currents set up in the aluminum disk, by off set electro magnets. The phase off set of the voltage and current is compensated for by the way the meter measures the power used. Its been almost 40 years since I studied this so correct me if I am wrong.

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  9. #9
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
    Bruce Adams Guest

    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    This looks like a scam to me. It is manufactured by a unknown manufacture. Sold on the internet under several names for anywhere from $400.00 to $1000.00. Three of the name is, Electric Saver Nitro, Electric Saver 1200, and Energy Saver 1800. It just plugs into an outlet in your home. I has nothing to do with your meter. I believe I would stay away from it. Seen a couple have not said anything about them.
    Bruce


  10. #10
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    Kind of like a rabbits foot, copper bracelets, and crystals; some people swear by them... others swear at them. Some of what I have seen "appears" to have some surge protection for the home but these things are long on promises and short on proof.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    5,847

    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    I think they sell something like that at Lowe's and Home Depot.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  12. #12
    Steve Karr's Avatar
    Steve Karr Guest

    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    In the description of how it works, it sounds a lot like a motor start-up capacitor. As for claims of saving electricity, who knows. The current savings that they are talking about is the start-up surge, which only lasts a few tenths of a second. This is hardly long enough to heat anything up to where power dissipation (IE heat) savings would be significant. I think there maybe more to extending motor life from having the energy (BTW energy is measured in joules that they speak to) available at the motor to get the RPM up to normal running parameters quickly.


  13. #13
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    Mar 2007
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    Oregon
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    Default Re: Energysaver 1800

    The night I posted this I also emailed my sister, a physics teacher at the local community college. She was away on vacation but just replied to me tonight. Her comments are below.... basically, there's no science to support it. As some mentioned, it does have some use in industrial applications but basically none for residential.

    Comments from physics professor/sister:

    OK, here's what I've found out. This device can help synchronize the current and voltage highs and lows, thereby increasing the "power factor" which determines how much energy is used for a limited number of appliances. I even have an equation for it, but who cares. What it comes down to is that most household appliances do not involve a "power factor" and will be completely unaffected by this device, saving no energy at all. In a few cases (things where a motor is involved) there will be a small advantage, but the cost savings are basically irrelevant for household use. The only real application for these things is in industry where they can have a huge impact on energy usage. This thing is sold under at least three names:

    Electric Saver Nitro, Electric Saver 1200, and Energy Saver 1800.
    Here are the best links I found:
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...er-1800-a.html
    Does the Electricity Saver Nitro and other electricity savers work and how many watts do you need? - Yahoo! Answers
    Electric Saver Nitro - Scam Review | open4energy
    Anyone use a power-saver 1200 to lower your electric bill? - Yahoo! Answers
    It seems that it was developed for industrial use, and is now being marketed inappropriately for household use.


    Edit: Ironcially, the first link my sister came up with was my post on this site


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