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  1. #1
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    Default Would you consider this a problem by definition

    In the Dallas area, 95% of the houses that I see have electric clothes dryers. In most cases the laudry rooms are equipped for electric dryers only. In about 20% of those houses, there is also a gas line for a gas dryer, even though I only see a gas dryer rarely. Today I inspected a house that had a gas line connection, but no 240 volt outlet for an electrical dryer. Seeing as eletrical dryers are more commonly found, would you consider the lack of a 240 V outlet, to be "a problem". Just curious as to others comments.

    Thx

    Gene

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    I don't note it as a problem. I just inform my client that only a gas dryer can be used at the current time.

    rick


  3. #3
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Pretty much the same. I write what is there and tell them that it is just gas. One client wanted me to write that there was no electric and just gas so why not, I wrote it up.

    Unless it is a safety item or a problem with future home movement/settlement problems such as no gutters. I only write about what is there or what is missing that should be there. Then again if the is a 60 to 70 foot long wall with no control joints I will write that up as one of the reasons for the cracking in the brick (there should have been control joints anyway).

    The more I write the more I am thinking it is all about the particular home and client that is involved.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene South View Post
    In the Dallas area, 95% of the houses that I see have electric clothes dryers. In most cases the laudry rooms are equipped for electric dryers only. In about 20% of those houses, there is also a gas line for a gas dryer, even though I only see a gas dryer rarely. Today I inspected a house that had a gas line connection, but no 240 volt outlet for an electrical dryer. Seeing as eletrical dryers are more commonly found, would you consider the lack of a 240 V outlet, to be "a problem". Just curious as to others comments.

    Thx

    Gene
    Not a deficiency, but a note to inform. i.e. check inspected only and a comment, but no check indicating deficiency.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Thanks guys, that tracks with what I was thinking also.

    Gene


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    It would just be an "information item" for me.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Why would lack of an 220v line be a issue at all?

    Normally just gas around here so unless it is a local code issue which we do not cover in reports there is no reason to worry unless there is a lack of makeup air or way to vent outside.


  8. #8
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Elliott View Post
    Why would lack of an 220v line be a issue at all?

    Normally just gas around here so unless it is a local code issue which we do not cover in reports there is no reason to worry unless there is a lack of makeup air or way to vent outside.

    It is just al in where one lives. A gas drier is a big expensive item and they may just have a brand new 700 dollar electric dryer. Around here the vast majority of dryer hook ups is electric. They move in and move their dryer in to find out they have to have a new line run from the panel into the attic and down into the wall where their dryer is going along with the outlet. We are talk n a few hundred..........if there is room in the panel. If no room then they need a remote panel and a few hundred more. gain, it is or can very easily become and expensive item.

    If there is electric hook ups and dryer hook ups I inform them that they have the choice and are usually pretty happy about that. I just don't want to be in the sad business and them thinking I should have told them even though reason says I just inspected what was there. No more referrals from them for a simple...."hey folks there is just a gas hook up. Do you have a gas dryer?"


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    It is just al in where one lives. A gas drier is a big expensive item and they may just have a brand new 700 dollar electric dryer. Around here the vast majority of dryer hook ups is electric. They move in and move their dryer in to find out they have to have a new line run from the panel into the attic and down into the wall where their dryer is going along with the outlet. We are talk n a few hundred..........if there is room in the panel. If no room then they need a remote panel and a few hundred more. gain, it is or can very easily become and expensive item.

    If there is electric hook ups and dryer hook ups I inform them that they have the choice and are usually pretty happy about that. I just don't want to be in the sad business and them thinking I should have told them even though reason says I just inspected what was there. No more referrals from them for a simple...."hey folks there is just a gas hook up. Do you have a gas dryer?"
    That should be covered in your materials section however if electric is the normal in your area a verbal comment would be fine IMO.


  10. #10
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Elliott View Post
    That should be covered in your materials section however if electric is the normal in your area a verbal comment would be fine IMO.
    Yes the dryer whether it be gas or electric gets listed but it is usuall a choice of one. I changed that page in my template to have a check box for both on the quick check off item but then in the narrative I explain what is there and what is not and also verbally tell the clients such. Also whether it is a three prong or four on the outlet. A pain in the but if they come in and expect to plug the dryer right in and it is only a three prong.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    I both gas and electric are not available, it goes in my FYI section.

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    Yes the dryer whether it be gas or electric gets listed but it is usuall a choice of one. I changed that page in my template to have a check box for both on the quick check off item but then in the narrative I explain what is there and what is not and also verbally tell the clients such. Also whether it is a three prong or four on the outlet. A pain in the but if they come in and expect to plug the dryer right in and it is only a three prong.
    True ,but the extra commenting is the difference between a "throw the check at me" and a good inspector.
    Good Job.


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    I would make a verbal mention of it but nothing would go in the report. As long as a hookup exists for a clothes dryer, whether it be gas or electric, that's what I look for. If there is no hookup present for any type of dryer, that would go in my report.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  14. #14
    Daniel Mummey's Avatar
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    No problem unless this house/laundry space was constructed during a time electrical code required 240 outlet for dryer (as it does currently) and your client is the owner or buyer. On the other hand, because of the stats you mentioned and I think this is pretty much the national scene, i would be advisable to add if your client (like a realtor/owner) is on the selling end.


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Mummey View Post
    No problem unless this house/laundry space was constructed during a time electrical code required 240 outlet for dryer (as it does currently) and your client is the owner or buyer. On the other hand, because of the stats you mentioned and I think this is pretty much the national scene, i would be advisable to add if your client (like a realtor/owner) is on the selling end.
    This must be a local requirement. There is no NEC requirement for a 240 volt dryer receptacle.


  16. #16
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    Post Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    I document the service available in the laundry for a dryer, in part so that my client will know what kind of dryer will work with the service available. Too many times, clients have said that they will be replacing the laundry machines, and had intended to buy an [electric] [gas] dryer when the service available was only for the other type.

    Randall Aldering GHI BAOM MSM
    Housesmithe Inspection
    www.housesmithe.com

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Hi ALL &

    Yessiree - either /or --> so long as one 'fuel' source has been provided & all works & nothing else is wrong with it, its OK (so long as the AHJ has no problem with it)...


    MERRY CHRISTMAS - One & all !

    -Glenn Duxbury, CHI

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Of course this is not a "problem".
    But you should report the fuel or energy source of appliances. ie: gas water heater, electric stove, gas dryer. If it's not the norm to have just a gas hook-up for dryer then you should provide that information as a courtesy.
    Also give safety advice associated with combustion appliances such as: Do Not use combustible dryer hoses or it could burn your house down.


  19. #19
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    If you are informing your clients about their new purchase and if your statistics are correct for your area, it seems to me like this would be a "problem" about 95% of the time.


  20. #20
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Problem or deficiency, NO. Worth a comment in the report absolutely. Gas dryers are the norm around here. Once in a while I'll see an electric dryer and no gas line and note it in the report, because around here it is abinormal. I have actually had clients call me a couple times and thank me for the note. "Boy sure glad you mentioned that electric dryer thing, we were just going to go ahead and order a gas dryer for delivery, that would have been a real drag getting the wrong one delivered". etc
    If something isn't the norm for your area, even if it isn't a deficiency, why wouldn't you report it. That information could be very helpful to the client. People do make assumptions based on their environment. Is the HI in too much of a hurry to get to the next one, no room on the crappy checkbox report to make a meaningful comment?

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    "Would you consider this a problem by definition".

    Only if they utilized what is supposed to be the additional dedicated laundry accessory outlet circuit (for ironing, etc.) to provide 120V power to the gas dryer. I would make note the laundry is outfitted for a gas dryer only since Electric is the norm for your area. The usual review regarding sufficient make-up and combustion air, competition with other appliances and mechanicals, etc. goes without saying, right?

    However, if the panel schedule, and/or a 2P breaker indicates or suggests a 240 dryer outlet was once or is present - That might warrant additional investigation or commentary. Concern that it may not be properly updated (schedule) or that not properly abandonded or repurposed, etc.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 12-21-2010 at 12:25 PM.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    =H.G. Watson, Sr.;154332
    Only if they utilized what is supposed to be the additional dedicated laundry accessory outlet circuit (for ironing, etc.) to provide 120V power to the gas dryer.
    Are you saying there needs to be a circuit dedicated for the washer that cannot be used for the gas dryer or iron?

    Last edited by Jim Port; 12-21-2010 at 12:59 PM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Nope. I said what I meant.


  24. #24
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Then what are you saying?

    Only if they utilized what is supposed to be the additional dedicated laundry accessory outlet circuit (for ironing, etc.) to provide 120V power to the gas dryer.
    Sounds like you are saying there needs to be two circuits in the laundry, one for the washer/dryer and another for the iron. If so you are wrong. The NEC requires one 20 amp circuit. This can serve for the washer, the dryer and the iron.


  25. #25
    Garrett Tan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Would you consider this a problem by definition

    Here in Utah, it's about half and half. I only indicate the current available source for the dryer. Half the time, there's a 220V AND Gas. There is no code here in Utah that specifies either source is necessary. If there isn't a defect or deficiency, I don't mention it in my reports. More importantly, I have never had a customer say anything regarding this issue. My comments are as follows:

    -220V receptacle for dryer tested successful.

    -Gas source only available for dryer.

    -Gas source for dryer also available.


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