Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St George
    Posts
    18

    Cool Theater lighting

    I did an inspection for a accident Attorney and he asked me if I would help him find out information about commercial theater lighting. I guess one of his clients fell because of lights that should of been working in the isles and weren't. Are there any IRC codes that would apply in this case? I have called the city building inspector for possible ordinance violation with no luck.

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Theater lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    I did an inspection for a accident Attorney and he asked me if I would help him find out information about commercial theater lighting. I guess one of his clients fell because of lights that should of been working in the isles and weren't. Are there any IRC codes that would apply in this case? I have called the city building inspector for possible ordinance violation with no luck.
    The IRC does not apply to commercial spaces, that's the IBC, NFPA standards as sometimes also involved in auditorium lighting requirements.

    The design of such spaces is a specialized area of architectural practice, and way above pay grade for most HIs, IMO.

    I assume this was "aisle lighting" (note: "aisle", not " isle)" which is different from "egress lighting".

    If so, that's your starting search term .

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St George
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Theater lighting

    Thank You! Too many people don't show gratitude for taking time to answer posts. I am grateful for your info and corrections.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    On The Mason-Dixon Line
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Theater lighting

    The first thing one would need to do is determine if it is about a light fixture that was not operating due to faulty maintenance ( burnt out bulbs),not operating due to elctrical controls ( wired into incorrect switch/dimmer bank, or light fixtures not installed as to the codes in place at the time of installation.
    If its about missing or incorrectly controled then one must determine what code was in place at the time of construction. Not only which code but what edition was enforced at the time of construction.
    One must also determine if said light fixture is emergency egress or aisle lighting as there differences.

    If you are not sure about any of these, I would suggest you contact an electrical engineer who is , for guidance. It involves an attorney, so most likely it involves the court system. Your information will need to be 100 % correct, with no gray areas.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,245

    Default Re: Theater lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    I did an inspection for a accident Attorney and he asked me if I would help him find out information about commercial theater lighting. I guess one of his clients fell because of lights that should of been working in the isles and weren't. Are there any IRC codes that would apply in this case? I have called the city building inspector for possible ordinance violation with no luck.

    A first step would be to find out when the building was constructed and under what code, and then when the theater was constructed within the building (may have been constructed later/remodeled later) and what code was applicable to that (may be the same code, but not necessarily the same code).

    The next step would be as stated by others above - what was the problem: missing light fixtures (never installed); light fixtures not working (due to a problem); light fixtures not turned on (dues to control settings, etc.).

    If the light fixtures are "missing" they may not have been required at the time of construction and then it becomes a gray area for the attorney who will need to base his case on 'recognized safety practices' and not code.

    If the light fixtures were simply not on (not working, not turned on, etc.), then the recognized safety factors which lead to the light fixtures being installed in the first place would play in 'cause' of the fall as the lights were not on, for whatever reason.

    Too many potential "ifs" to contemplate them all without a lot more information and knowledge of what is and what was required.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Theater lighting

    Oh look! The lights aren't working! I think I will go for a walk!

    Unless you are getting paid keep away from the accident attorney. Do the work for the investigation on his dime.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •