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  1. #1
    jason schatz's Avatar
    jason schatz Guest

    Default box fill in commercial electrical

    so I am still undertaking my education for starting my inspection career... but I was recently in a new commercial (actually, school) building project -- - and given my recent propensity to pay attention to building construction, I couldn't help but notice this electrical box.

    now, I have done plenty of electrical work, and am familiar with box fill calculations ---- these are all 12ga wires, how can they possibly be expected to fit in that small metallic box... am I missing something?

    I know this is a bit out of the scope of normal home inspections...but from reading this forum I also know there are a lot of experienced folks out there with electrical knowledge, so I was curious as to thoughts.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Colorado Front Range

    Default Re: box fill in commercial electrical

    As things sit the box is too full. However, the wire is long enough to add an extension box (or two) and be legal fill-wise with the added space. These can be added before or after the connections are made.

    A larger box would be a much cleaner install. I'm not seeing much in the picture that speaks to good practice and this really doesn't look very good for new work - but a picture that shows more area would be more telling as to what's going on. A terrible looking job can still be legal. This one is missing a bushing on the PVC male adapter attached to the bottom conduit.

  3. #3
    jason schatz's Avatar
    jason schatz Guest

    Default Re: box fill in commercial electrical

    Hi Bill -

    That's what I was thinking. I didn't take any other pictures as I wasn't there to do any type of inspection - just checking out the new construction in a school building. This was a science lab, and the contractor had brought up The hot conductors from the floor (as you can see..and it looks like 3 separate hot circuits) then branched off ten times --- with each piece of conduit going to an electrical receptacle at a lab station along that wall. I counted 10 branches, plus the hot wires coming... A bit concerning. I'll be interested to see the result.


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