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  1. #1
    Elliott Taylor's Avatar
    Elliott Taylor Guest

    Default electrical question

    hi all,

    i'm a total newbee to all this stuff. could anyone please describe this to me.

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  2. #2
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: electrical question

    It looks like a fused service panel. I would check the size of the grounding conductor in the feeder conduit leaving the panel.


  3. #3
    Philip Desmarais's Avatar
    Philip Desmarais Guest

    Default Re: electrical question

    I’ll give it a try Elliott. When you say “total newbee”, I’m assuming you want a little more information. Depending on with whom you’re talking this is a main disconnect, a service disconnect, a main panel, service equipment, a service equipment panel and/or a service panel. I’m sure there are other names people call it. Personally I prefer service disconnect. In this case it is a fused service disconnect, with the two fuses protecting the equipment that is downstream (load side) of this disconnect. Power from the utility enters the lower left of the panel and attaches to the lugs at the top. The conductors at the bottom right of the panel presumably go to an equipment panel within the dwelling/building which contains multiple smaller circuit protectors for individual circuits. This particular panel has a spring assisted mechanism for operating the knife blades which allows for quick connection and disconnection of the fuses from the service conductors. The two lugs on the left are the service neutral (top) and the equipment neutral (bottom). The voltage between each of one of the two fuses and the neutral is approximately 120v. The voltage between the two fuses is approximately 240v, depending on the design of the particular utility’s distribution system. The bare copper conductor on the lower left is the service ground. The insulated conductor with green tape is the service equipment ground. The big lump under the tape is the splice that corrects the mistake of cutting the wires too short.


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: electrical question

    Would anyone comment on the spliced neutral wire downstream of the disconnect?

    Is that just some trash below the splice or is it scorching?

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: electrical question

    (bold is mine to designate those names it could be referred to as because there is *no* panel section to it - meaning there should not be any "panel" in its name, thus, it could be referred to as
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Desmarais View Post
    Depending on with whom you’re talking this is a main disconnect, a service disconnect, a main panel, service equipment, a service equipment panel and/or a service panel.
    I hope that clears up some of the confusion caused by those who insist on including the term "panel" into something which has no "panel", and why it should not be referred to as an name with "panel" in it.

    By the way, *it is* the "main disconnect", which *is the same thing as* the "service disconnect", both of which *are part of* the "service equipment", meaning that any of the above terms in bold would be correct.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Elliott Taylor's Avatar
    Elliott Taylor Guest

    Default Re: electrical question

    very helpful thank you. That was not scorching but just some trash bruce. Should the splicing be mentioned?

    Last edited by Elliott Taylor; 08-03-2007 at 07:28 PM.

  7. #7
    Rob Thomas's Avatar
    Rob Thomas Guest

    Default Re: electrical question

    Elliott,

    I hope the attached will be of help to you. It is an excerpt from an article in the April/May 2003 Fine Homebuilding entitled "Subpanels Bring Big Amps to Small Spaces". It explains why 3 conductors come in to the main panel, and why 4 conductors go out to the sub panel.

    RT


    Quote Originally Posted by Elliott Taylor View Post
    hi all,

    i'm a total newbee to all this stuff. could anyone please describe this to me.


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: electrical question

    Hi Elliott,

    Welcome to the board... Another helpful source of info is the 'Codecheck' series of books. It's similar info to what Rob suggested above and can be very educational.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: electrical question

    Rob,

    In your effort to justify keep using the term "main panel" for "service equipment" you have ignored the fact (which I pointed out just for you) that *there is NO panel* section to that main disconnect/service disconnect/ service equipment.

    The reference page you posted, and I wish you would compare and read what you post to what you are saying and to what is being discussed, shows a "panelboard" (i.e., "panel") section in that service equipment.

    The photo under discussion at the top of thread is simply a "main disconnect"/"service disconnect"/"service equipment" - *there is NO panel there.

    Matt, you followed up Rob's post with one from CodeCheck which also shows a "panel" as part of the "service equipment", and, again, there is no panel section to the fused main disconnect in the original post's photo.

    Not quite sure why some of you try to insist on calling something a panel when there is no panel in it. ESPECIALLY when it is an admitted newbie looking for correct information.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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