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  1. #1
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    Default Readily Accessible-question

    Just a question about the definition: Accessible, Readily (Readily Accessible).
    Capable of being reached quickly for operation, renewal, or inspections without requiring those to whom ready access is requisite to climb over or remove obstacles or to resort to portable ladders, and so forth.
    So...if a GFI for a hydro massage tub is "inside" the tub, and you have to remove a plate in order to shut the thing off, is this readily accessible?
    So.."and so forth" appears to be pretty vague or open to interpretation.
    Metal box kinda seems like it would be a "double whammy" in a worse case situation.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Readily Accessible-question

    No it isn't 'readily accessible.

    2011 NEC further addresses just this situation- requiring combination receptacles/GFCIs to be readilly accessible for testing purposes -- therefore no more sofas in fron of the GFCI, no more placing refrigerators in front of combination GFCI/recepactles, etc.

    Off topic: BTW, I've enjoyed your posts with your IR photography. Its been fun reviewing your posts of pics w/o having to actually "do the work" to acquire the images, and to not have to had spent the money to pay for the equipment!

    Don't be detered by the naysayers from sharing. Keep it coming, nice work, and thank you for sharing! The marvels of technology... getting cheaper by the day. Oh, how I am feeling my age!

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 05-29-2011 at 01:40 AM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Readily Accessible-question

    If the Manf. installation instructions did not require the GFI.
    Code at time of installation did not require the installation of a GFI.
    But a GFI was used as a safety precaution in an non readilly accessible location.
    Does it still fall into a non compliance category under the 2011 NEC?

    Or, stated another way; is it that all GFI no mater where located and though not required in location, must he accessible with out exception?


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Readily Accessible-question

    The readily accessible requirement was added to the 2011. Before that it was just accessible.

    Remember that the NEC is not retroactive.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Readily Accessible-question

    JP, good point. Thanks for reminding me of that...

    H.G., IR is pretty fun, and interresting. Just adds another level of depth to an inspection. We'll keep'em coming, I've got pretty thick skin.

    The MAZZA INSPECTION GROUP
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Readily Accessible-question

    When and if a replacement of unit, device, or if a desired upgrade FOR SAFETY is made (NEC changes are always about safety), or when a new installation is made- this is easily done by using an upstream or line side GFCI usually a "deadfront" GFCI in the wall at some "readily accessible" location, which provides load side protection to a regular receptacle under the hydro tub deck for the packaged unit or a heater; and swapping out the combination gfci receptacle under the tub deck with a regular receptacle, the cord cap/plug removal from said receptacle still acts as the local disconnect for service which is still allowed behind the panel. The face of the receptacle has to be within certain distance access from the panel and face the panel opening access now.

    Some deadfront GFCI devices may be dually listed. The line side gfci receptacle hidden in the linen closet, etc. has similar "issues" oftentimes regarding the newer "readily accessible" requirements.

    Now the device is still protected, still has its servicable disconnect under the deck - and the GFCI is readily accessible - for those strongly recommended monthly "tests", and those 'suggested' and/or recommended by some pkg'd hydro tub mfg's testing prior to each use (that's a bit much, but obviously some have paid out a settlement leading to that language in the manual...ya' think?).

    Of course a gfci CB is also a possiblity, but oftentimes wasn't a practical solution in the first place -- if you found a combination gfci receptacle under the tub deck to begin with (such as older panels, or full panels without enough room available to swap the existing circuit breaker for the gfci version due to size and spacing requirements).

    Certain provisions in the NEC, especially regards to GFCI protection are not "grandfather exempted provisions" and are invoked/proscribed during "events" such as when a receptacle is replaced - if in an area requiring protection, said protection must be provided when or before said replacement device is installed, or when equipment in an area or of a type now required to be protected is replaced, or taken out of service then placed back into service (unplugged, then plugged back in). 2011 has some provisions in that regard (proscribed), some have been around for quite some time, some for a few cycles, and some new with 2011(bathroom receptacle protection; replacing 2-wire convenience receptacles with other than same; that un-protected receptacle for the garage refrigerator or freezer, or the garage door opener receptacle; replacing the broken weather proof cap cover on exterior exposed receptacles with protected in-use covers, etc.).

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 05-29-2011 at 09:49 PM.

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