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  1. #1
    Jon mackay's Avatar
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    Default Hard wired clothes dryer

    When a clothes dryer is hard wired, is a disconnect required at the dryer area?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Hard wired clothes dryer

    Under 210.23(B) there can be multiple receptacles on a 30 amp BC.

    As an electrician, I would prefer a LOTO for this circuit if there are multiple receptacles on this BC.

    However, if there are no other receptacles, I would want either a LOTO at the main CB or a disconnect immediately before the device so that I can service the circuit.

    Last edited by Donald Farrell; 06-03-2011 at 08:22 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Hard wired clothes dryer

    If, as with the case with most 240 volt appliances, the switch doesn't disconnect both ungrounded conductors, yes.

    Most modern appliances have clocks, electronic timers, and/or computers built-in, in addition to things like lights that come on when a door is opened.

    If any of this stuff is present and works when the dryer is off the answer is yes.

    Otherwise a glance at a wiring diagram or installation instructions for the unit should be consulted. I think this would also answer the nagging question of is the dryer permitted to be hard wired in the first place.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Hard wired clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    When a clothes dryer is hard wired, is a disconnect required at the dryer area?
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kriegh View Post
    If, as with the case with most 240 volt appliances, the switch doesn't disconnect both ungrounded conductors, yes.

    Most modern appliances have clocks, electronic timers, and/or computers built-in, in addition to things like lights that come on when a door is opened.

    If any of this stuff is present and works when the dryer is off the answer is yes.

    Otherwise a glance at a wiring diagram or installation instructions for the unit should be consulted. I think this would also answer the nagging question of is the dryer permitted to be hard wired in the first place.
    No, a disconnect "at the dryer area" is not required, the breaker could have a lock out on it and that would serve as the disconnect.

    However, as Bill said: "the nagging question of is the dryer permitted to be hard wired in the first place.", is the appliance listed for this connection, does this connection allow for the dryer to be pulled out for connection and disconnection of the dryer exhaust duct to the dryer connector from the dryer, does this allow for ... there could be other things which would be affected by permanently wiring the dryer connection, and some permanent wiring methods may allow for some of those items, but it is listed for installation permanently wired?

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Hard wired clothes dryer

    I suppose we're to assume the appliance is an electric, non-condensing,
    clothes dryer for residential (not commercial) installation not for clothes wetted with other than water, and upon a 120/240V dedicated multi-wire
    branch circuit; straight 240? poly-phase? on-board PS? I suppose we're
    to assume whether there is a ground present or not? UL Cat. Code KMEX? UL Standard 2158? I guess we're supposed to assume this is a SF residence installation, not a "manufactured home", not a shared "laundry room" such as a duplex, tri-plex, apartment, condo, motel/hotel, commercial laundry, drycleaing establishment, hospital, etc.?

    Are we supposed to presume this is a wall-insert, recessed, or free-standing installation?

    What exactly do you mean by "hard wired"...cord or direct wiring method?

    It depends.

    There must be a means to disconnect - whether or not an additional means is another story.

    If supplied from a circuit breaker which is also a service disconnect, or if
    there is an intermediate disconnect (main before CB) and same's proximity to the appliance and/or if same can be "locked out".

    Appliance manufacturer's installation instructions for the "assumed" Listed
    appliance, are also "helpful" as are the LABELED instructions.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 06-04-2011 at 10:12 PM.

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