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  1. #1
    imported_John Smith's Avatar
    imported_John Smith Guest

    Default 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

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  2. #2
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    Interestingly vague question. I presume you refer to straight-blade devices.

    As with all things electrical and safety in nature, you'd need to start prior to the service or main power feeder and the circuit origin and determine safety and personal protection. Unknown your skill set or training in this area.

    You might start by identifying the NEMA type receptacle, 3 or 4 blade type (grounded or not), the amperage rating, etc.; this is easily identified visually. Next checking the circuit protection rating, visualize if necessary additional protection is in place (such as GFCI, GFPE, etc. where required for safety) and see if they match; determining if the circuit has indeed been turned off (checking for voltage, backfeed, etc.); appropriateness of conductor size(s), type, condition, connections, etc.

    Not really sure what you're looking for here, or your knowledge baseline on the subject, or "how far" you wish to go. Checking voltage on each leg, etc. One would first need to know if the service was traditional residential split single phase, polyphase, etc. Some "funky" (re: unsafe, illegal, etc.) installations, i.e. reverse feed for SDS/back-up generators, etc. have been seen in the field.

    I've attached a one-page .pdf file with straight blade receptacle and plug NEMA configuration chart. You can source this yourself at HubbelOnLine here (clickable link): http://www.hubbellonline.com/wiring/bryant/pdf/b/b5.pdf or elsewhere on the internet.

    Attached Files Attached Files

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    I use a wiggy.


  4. #4
    imported_John Smith's Avatar
    imported_John Smith Guest

    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    I have a very basic knowledge of electricity, certainly not an electrician.

    Trying to improve - looking for typical test methods/tools. Want to make sure I am at least doing what would be considered in alignment with what other home inspectors do.

    I wasnt aware that GFCI exists on 240V circuits.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    You will find 240V GFCI on things like spas, etc.


  6. #6
    Roger Frazee's Avatar
    Roger Frazee Guest

    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    Quote Originally Posted by imported_John Smith View Post
    How do you inspect 240V circuit receptacles? Dryers/electric ovens/etc.
    First thing to do is determine if the branch circuit is 3 wire or 4 wire. If 3 wire is it an existing branch circuit prior to 1996 code cycle. A dryer using a 3 wire branch circuit (H-H-N) is terminated to a nema 10-30R receptacle ..... 4 wire to a nema 14-30R. For example if the home was built in 2002 after the requirement for 4 wire went into effect in 1996 and the dryer was cord and plugged into a nema 10-30R you have an immediate red flag as it would be required to be a nema 14-30R on a 4 wire (H-H-N-Grd) branch circuit.

    If you were to find this in an inspection there are several issues that might result and may not be in your scope to investigate ... likely should be looked at by an electrician.

    Another possibility may be when your inspecting the interior of the electrical panel and you notice that the dryer has a 4 wire branch circuit yet the dryer receptacle is 3 wire 10-30R or vice versa.

    So you need to brush up on 3 wire and 4 wire branch circuits both the code requirements and proper hardware and wiring configurations.

    I do not really know if all is good if you as a home inspector actually test the receptacle for proper voltage between terminals. I would think that your major concern is code compliance for the branch circuit and obvious signs of arcing at the dryer receptacle or any other safety issues.


    Below is what your voltage measurements would be at the receptacle for a dryer which is an appliance that requires 240 volts and 120 volts as do most oven ranges. A cooking range would be the same only 14-50R

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Last edited by Roger Frazee; 08-15-2011 at 10:03 AM. Reason: added diagram

  7. #7
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Frazee View Post
    First thing to do is determine if the branch circuit is 3 wire or 4 wire If 3 wire is it an existing branch circuit prior to 1996 code cycle. A dryer using a 3 wire branch circuit (H-H-N) is terminated to a nema 10-30R receptacle ..... 4 wire to a nema 14-30R. For example if the home was built in 2002 after the requirement for 4 wire went into effect in 1996 and the dryer was cord and plugged into a nema 10-30R you have an immediate red flag as it would be required to be a nema 14-30R on a 4 wire (H-H-N-Grd) branch circuit.

    If you were to find this in an inspection there are several issues that might result and may not be in your scope to investigate ... likely should be looked at by an electrician.

    Another possibility may be when your inspecting the interior of the electrical panel and you notice that the dyer has a 4 wire branch circuit yet the dryer receptacle is 3 wire 10-30R or vice versa.

    So you need to brush up on 3 wire and 4 wire branch circuits both the code requirements and proper hardware and wiring configurations.

    I do not really know if all is good if you as a home inspector actually test the receptacle for proper voltage between terminals. I would think that your major concern is code compliance for the branch circuit and obvious signs of arcing at the dryer receptacle or any other safety issues.


    Below is what your voltage measurements would be at the receptacle for a dryer which is an appliance that requires 240 volts and 120 volts as do most oven ranges.
    Thanks for the picture Roger. I have no idea what happens to some of the pictures I create or save/steel. They just go away over time.


  8. #8
    Join Date
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    New York
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    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    Get a multi meter, test each leg for 120, and combined for 240.

    Last edited by Steven Turetsky; 08-15-2011 at 01:07 AM.
    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    New Westminster, B. C., Canada
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    Default Re: 240V Circuit Receptacle Inspection

    Hi ALL &

    * In case you don't have any other testing equipment, just grab a Range /Dryer from your toolbag & voila !


    CHEERS !

    -Glenn Duxbury, CHI

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