Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 66 to 77 of 77
  1. #66
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,898

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Jerry, Derek,

    I have posted the code articles being discussed and then substituted the 210.52(B) with a listing of rooms into one passage.

    The unedited is shown first for reference and the combined is shown in blue.


    (C) Dwelling Units.
    (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the
    number of branch circuits required by other parts of this
    section, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits
    shall be provided for all receptacle outlets specified by
    210.52(B).

    (B) Small Appliances.
    (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch
    circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and
    floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop
    outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for
    refrigeration equipment.
    Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptacles
    specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a
    general-purpose branch circuit as defined in 210.70(A)(1),
    Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.
    Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration
    equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual
    branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.
    (2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance
    branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no
    other outlets.
    Exception No. 1: A receptacle installed solely for the electrical
    supply to and support of an electric clock in any of
    the rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1).
    Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide power
    for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired
    ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.
    (3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed
    in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be
    supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,
    either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply
    receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms
    specified in 210.52(B)(1). Additional small-appliance branch
    circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the
    kitchen and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No smallappliance
    branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.

    Combining the two sections, I come up with this.

    (B)(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance
    branch circuits specified in the kitchen, pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit shall have no other outlets.


    (B)(3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed
    in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be
    supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,
    either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply
    receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit. Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the
    kitchen and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No small appliance branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.


    Member Benefits1
    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  2. #67
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    601

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    I am just amazed at the stuff Watson comes up with.

    I can put a counter in a bedroom and use it for a hot plate, a microwave, a computer, a desk light, charging the cell phone, an alarm clock, and a whole number of other uses. The fact I put a microwave on the counter and plug it in has not altered the fact that the room is a bedroom with a counter. An AHJ has no way of knowing how the counter will be/is being used unless they continuously monitor with a camera or 24/7 on site inspector.

    Now, if the builder is conscious of the fact that the first occupant intends to use the counter for a microwave, or indeed, even a computer server, he is certainly free to install a circuit(s) dedicated to that receptacle (or receptacles) on/by/near/above/below that counter rated at whatever current the anticipated load is.

    However, if we have a SABC extending from the kitchen to this receptacle because somebody "might" use a microwave, we have defeated the intent of the SABC requirement should the lady of the house mount a mirror above said counter and use it for blow driers, curling irons, and such. This is why you do NOT have a small appliance branch circuit in a bedroom. Add another circuit if you want to handle an anticipated load. It simply CAN NOT be a SABC because the area is not a permanent area for the storage, preparation and consumption of food. Period. Or, are you saying a SABC is required/needed in a bedroom and the required sign that says the receptacle is reserved for small appliance use and/or cooking was overlooked by the code folks? Call the circuit what it is - a circuit required for anticipated loads, which is required by the NEC anyway. It is in no way a SABC.

    It's pretty evident some of us have been doing this a long time and have a da**site better grip on what the intent of the NEC is than you do or ever will have. You most certainly are NOT the wordly expert on all things you pretend to be and anybody with an ounce of sense can see that. I do not care if you were ever in a position to make determinations on some of these matters. Even if you have the education and qualifications to do so your interpretations of virtually everything fly in the face of common sense and reason. Do you really think none of have requested interpretations from the NFPA folks of many of these things because we had a jerk like you spewing whatever came to mind to prove some sort of a superior position over the rest of us?

    I'm really interested in knowing how you come up with this crap. Irrelevant code references and fancy references to "I think I'll have breakfast in bed this morning" just don't cut it.

    There's no doubt in my mind that you can have pertinent contribution to a lot of discussions and if you were content to do that instead of try to control and confuse the issue the readers would be better served.


  3. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore of MD, NEC 2008
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    (B)(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance
    branch circuits specified in the kitchen, pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit shall have no other outlets.


    (B)(3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed
    in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be
    supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,
    either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply
    receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit. Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the
    kitchen and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No small appliance branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen
    This works for me Jim.

    .






  4. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    "
    So ... I ask you again ... is it your position that ALL the 20 ampere receptacles in the "kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area" are required to be small appliance branch circuits?

    Nope, just the required ones serving the wall spaces and counter tops.

    Are you also telling me that every "kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area" requires two or more small appliance branch circuits?

    Nope, two only for serving all the required ones in all the areas would work, I will even let you put the fridge on one of them.

    "



    Okay ... what walls spaces in a dining room are *required* to have SABC?

    In *addition to* the general use receptacles.

    Are you saying (I keep trying to get you to answer this) that EVERY 20 amp circuit I put in a dining room IS REQUIRED to be a SABC? That I cannot run a 20 amp general purpose circuit to the living room, dining room, breakfast room, family room - that ALL of those circuits ARE REQUIRED to be considered SABC?

    That is the question I keep asking and you keep *not* answering. You are dancing around the bush, that is for sure, but you are *not* answering it.
    Improper question because it is based upon an improper presumption.

    NO "general use" receptacles are allowed below 5-1/2 feet as the REQUIRED wall receptacles, those floor receptacles, or counter area receptacles in a dining room.

    Dedicated receptacles for fixed or specific equipment, individual branch circuit supplied singluar receptacles, and the limited exception GENERAL LIGHTING switched outlet(s)/receptacle(s) provided in LIEU OF LIGHTING OUTLETS are the ONLY "other" 15- or 20- amp readily accessible under 5-1/2 feet, multi-outlet circuit supplied receptacles allowed in dining room. When in "the zone" in a dining room, not otherwise excepted, receptacles must be on a SABC. A SABC does NOT require GFCI protection in and of itself.

    Apparently you keep missing the words "ALL" and "ONLY" and "EVERY" (such as in 210.11(C)(1), in 210.52(B)(1), don't overlook exceptions), the inclusivity of 210.52(C), And the EXCLUSION of "other receptacles" dictated by 210.23(A)'s EXCEPTION. No matter what, if you have a dining room it will require "outlets" from at least two circuits - one being a SABC, the other for the purposes of LIGHITNG - which must be switched, and which may not be powered via a SABC, whether the outlets are a luminaire wall or ceiling - or a switched receptacle. The spacing of the SABC outlets (receptacles) are dictated as they are generally for wall spaces and countertops should they exist. The mandate is that they be SABC supplied if in a dining room, except the exceptions already noted. If you have "general use" receptacles in a dining room they had better be more than 20 inches above a countertop and more than 5-1/2 feet above the floor.

    210.2 Other Articles for Specific-Purpose Branch Circuits. Branch circuits shall comply with this article and also with the applicable provisions of other articles of this Code. The provisions for branch circuits supplying equipment listed in Table 210.2 ammend or supplement the provisions in this article and shall apply to branch circuits referred to therein.

    210.7 Branch-Circuit Requirements for Device Connections and Locations.

    (A) Receptacle Outlet Location. Receptacle outlets shall be located in branch circuits in accordance with Part III of Article 210.


    210.11 Branch Circuits Required. Branch circuits for lighting and for appliances, including motor-operated appliances, shall be provided to supply the loads calculated in accordance with 220.10. In addition, branch circuits shall be provided for specific loads not covered by 220.10 where required elsewhere in this Code and for dwelling unit loads as specified in 210.11(C).
    (A) Number of Branch Circuits. The minimum number of branch circuits shall be determined from the total calculated load and the size or rating of the circuits used. In all installations, the number of circuits shall be sufficient to supply the load served. In no case shall the load on any circuit exceed the maximum specified by 220.18.


    (B) Load Evenly Proportioned Among Branch Circuits. Where the load is calculated on the basis of volt-amperes per square meter or per square foot, the wiring system up to and including the branch-circuit panelboard(s) shall be provided to serve not less than the calculated load. This load shall be evenly proportioned among multioutlet branch circuits within the panelboard(s). Branch-circuit overcurrent devices and circuits shall be requred to be installed only to serve the connected load.


    (C) Dwelling Units.
    (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits shall be provided for all receptacle outlets specified by 210.52(B).<B>
    210.21 Outlet Devices. Outlet devices shall have an ampere rating that is not less than the load to be served and shall comply with 210.21(A) and (B).
    (A) Lampholders. Where connected to a branch circuit having a rating in excess of 20 amperes....

    (B) Receptacles.
    (1) Single Receptacle on an Individual Branch Circuit. A single receptacle installed on an individual branch circuit shall have an ampere rating not less than that of the branch circuit.
    (2) Total Cord-and-Plug-Connected Load. Where connected to a branch circuit supplying two or more receptacles or outlets, a receptacle shall not supply a total cord-and-plug-connected load in excess of the maximum specified in Table 210.21(B)(2)
    Table 210.21(B)(2) Maximum Cord-and-Plug-Connected Load to Receptacle

    Circuit Rating Receptacle Rating Maximum Load
    15 or 20A 15A 12A
    20A 20A 16A
    30A 30A 24A
    </B>


    210.23 Permissible Loads. In no case shall the load exceed the branch-circuit ampere rating. An individual branch circuit shall be permitted to supply any load for which it is rated. A branch circuit supplying two or more outlets or receptacles shall supply only the loads specified according to its size as specified in 210.23(A) through (D) and as summarized in 210.24 and Table 210.24.
    (A) 15- and 20-Ampere Branch Circuits. A 15- or 20-ampere branch circuit shall be permitted to supply lighting units or other utilization equipment, or a combination of both, and shall comply with 210.23(A)(1) and (A)(2).
    • Exception: The small-appliance branch circuits, laundry branch circuits, and bathroom branch circuits required in a dwelling unit(s) by 210.11(C)(1), (C)(2), and (C)(3) shall supply only the receptacle outlets specified in that section.
    (1) Cord-and-Plug-Connected Equipment Not Fastened in Place. The rating of any one cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place shall not exceed 80 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating.

    (2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.
    (B) 30-Ampere Branch Circuits. A 30-ampere ...
    (C) 40- and 50-Ampere Branch Circuits...
    (D) Branch Circuits Larger Than 50 Amperes...
    210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets. This section provides requirements for 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets. The receptacles required by this section shall be in addition to any receptacle that is:
    • (1) Part of a luminaire or appliance, or
    • (2) Controlled by a wall switch in accordance with 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, or
    • (3) Located within cabinets or cupboards, or
    • (4) Located more than 1.7m (5-1/2 ft) above the floor.
    (A) General Provisions. In every kitchen, family room, dining room, living room, parlor, library, den, dunroom, bedroom, recreation room, or similar room or area of dwelling units, receptacle outlets shall be installed in accordance with the general provisions specified in 210.52(A)(1) through (A)(3).
    (1) Spacing. Receptacles shall be installed such that no point measured horizontally along the floor liine in any wall space is more than 1.8 m (6 ft) from a receptacle outlet.

    (2) Wall Space. As used in this section, a wall space shall include the following:
    • (1) Any space 600 mm (2 ft) or more in width (including space measured around corners) and unbroken along the floor line by doorways, fireplaces, and similar openings
    • (2) The space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, excluding sliding panels
    • (3) The space afforded by fixed room dividers such as free-standing bar-type counters or railings
    (3) Floor Receptacles. Receptacle outlets in floors shall not be counted as part of the required number of receptacle outlets unless located within 450 mm (18 in.) of the wall.
    (B) Small Appliances.
    (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.
    • Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a general purpose branch circuit as defined in 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.
    • Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.
    (2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no other outlets.
    • Exception No. 1: A receptacle installed solely for the electrical supply to and support of an electric clock in any of the rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1).
    • Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide power for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.
    (3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits, either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). Additional small=appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the kitchen and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No small-appliance branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.
    (C) Countertops. In kitchens, Pantires, Breakfast Rooms, Dining Rooms and Similar Areas of dwelling units, receptacle outlets for countertop spaces shall be installed in accordance with 210.52(C)(1) through (C)(5).
    Where a range, counter-mounted cooking unit, or sink is installed in an island or peninsular countertop and the width of the countertop behind the range, counter-mounted cooking unit, o sink is less than 300 mm (12 in.), the range, counter-mounted cooking unit, or sink is considered to divide the countertop space into two separate countertop spaces as defined in 210.52(C)(4). Each separate countertop space shall comply with the applicable requirements in 210.52(C).
    210.70 Lighting Outlets Required. Lighting outlets shall be installed where specified in 210.70(A), (B), and (C).
    (A) Dwelling Units. In dwelling units, lighting outlets shall be installed in accordance with 210.70(A)(1), (A)(2), and (A)(3).
    (1) Habital Rooms. At least one wall switch-controlled lighting outlet shall be installed in every habital room and bathroom.
    • Exception No. 1: In other than kitchens and bathrooms, one or more receptacles controlled by a wall switch shall be permitted in lieu of lighting outlets.


    The spacing/location requirements in no way grant exception or are in anyway permissive to install NON-SABC multi-outlet "GENERAL USE" receptacles in a dining room below 5-1/2 feet up from the floor. If not a switched LIGHTING OUTLET (ex. 1 for switched receptacle) or an individual for refrigeration or other specified SPECIAL (never supplied by "general") or not IN a cabinet or cupboard, etc. then it isn't allowed in the Dining Room.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 10-13-2011 at 02:53 PM.

  5. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Too funny Kreigh,

    Obvious why you aren't qualifed contractor, planner, designer, etc. and don't know what you're talking about.

    Any one who knows, would recognize a "coffee bar" in a suite, alcove, or open on a continuous wall, esp. one with a designated small refrigerator AND understand WHY same will have "outlets" designated from a SABC, and NOT be from the same circuit or circuits supplying the "general purpose convenience" receptacles in the rest of the bedroom, nor share the same circuit as the (if present) switched receptacles provided for general lighting.

    Small wonder since you oftentimes still claim AFCI includes GFCI protection for personnel, and have no clue regarding the NON-EXCLUSION of SABCs outlets serving kitchen countertops within the kitchen itself.

    SABCs can have AFCI protection, its done all the time.

    Snack counters dry or wet, coffee bars dry or wet, oh and there's the SABC-fed receptacle OFTENTIMES employed for the diabetic child's room adjacent to the bed, containing medications, juices, and liquids. DONE ALL THE TIME. For a while that dry snack counter, popcorn machine and refrigerator in the "Theatre Room" was the latest trend - also supplied with SABC at the SNACK COUNTER & behind the refrigerator and wine cooler below it.

    Plugging any residential refrigerator in other than an individual branch circuit single outlet, a special or dedicated circuit, OR a multi-outlet SABC in a dwelling unit would be a technical violation.

    The code USED to further explain what was meant by "OTHER AREAS", at that time indicating "where food is likely to be SERVED" (not prepared). It was LATER removed, because that was no longer meant by "other areas" it STILL includes "where food is likely to be served" it also includes where refrigeration equipment is intended to be placed, it also includes where small appliances are intended to be used, and it continues to include where microwaves, corn poppers, toasters, toaster ovens, cook pots, crock pots, warming trays, cook coils, percolators, hot pots, and other heat producing appliances utilized to warm, heat, cook, cool, refrigerate, or freeze foods (which includes liquids)! Does not include communications equipment, and a host of other equipment.

    Supply same with a shared general circuit, esp. one that includes lighting and you're violating the NEC Plain and simple.


  6. #71
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,898

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Small wonder since you oftentimes still claim AFCI includes GFCI protection for personnel, and have no clue regarding the NON-EXCLUSION of SABCs outlets serving kitchen countertops within the kitchen itself.
    AFCI breakers incorporate Class B GFI protection which trips at 30mA. This is not the level to satisfy where Class A 4-6mA protection is required like bathrooms, exterior or kitchen countertop receptacles.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  7. #72
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore of MD, NEC 2008
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kriegh View Post
    I am just amazed at the stuff Watson comes up with.
    How do you think I feel? I am new here and he scares the hell out of me.

    PS. I am a sparkie, not an HI.


  8. #73
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    AFCI breakers incorporate Class B GFI protection which trips at 30mA. This is not the level to satisfy where Class A 4-6mA protection is required like bathrooms, exterior or kitchen countertop receptacles.

    Exactly. GFPE is NOT ground fault protection for persons, despite what Kreigh has posted here over and over again.

    It furthermore does not have to trip in a timely enough fashion as does GFCI Class A protection.


  9. #74
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    Combining the two sections, I come up with this.

    (B)(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance
    branch circuits specified in the kitchen, pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit shall have no other outlets.


    (B)(3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed
    in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be
    supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,
    either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply
    receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in pantry,
    breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
    unit. Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the
    kitchen and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No small appliance branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Guridi View Post
    This works for me Jim.
    That works for me too. I figured out what I was missing (I did say 'unless I am missing something' several times , I was right at least with that part).

    Okay, I am NOW on the same page as you guys - mentally erased the old thinking and inserted the new thinking in its place. Thanks, now I just have to start watching for that on the new houses going up, if they are wired correctly, no harm no foul on the ones passed before, if they are not wired correctly ... at least now I will catch them.

    Sometimes it like pulling teeth the old fashioned way, I have to have the code jammed down me before I see what I was missing.

    Whew! At least I didn't make a bigger fool out of me than I already had above.

    Okay, we are now one fool less here, but there is still that Watson dude ...

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  10. #75
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    601

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    Plugging any residential refrigerator in other than an individual branch circuit single outlet, a special or dedicated circuit, OR a multi-outlet SABC in a dwelling unit would be a technical violation. .
    You better have a code reference.

    Small wonder since you oftentimes still claim AFCI includes GFCI protection for personnel, and have no clue regarding the NON-EXCLUSION of SABCs outlets serving kitchen countertops within the kitchen itself.

    You better have a reference

    SABCs can have AFCI protection, its done all the time

    What is your point. The 2011 NEC requires AFCI protection on all circuits in a dining room, and that there would include the SABCs.

    210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.
    (A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms,
    parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.

    As to the rest of the post the AHJ I was visiting with today says you're full of **ap too.


  11. #76
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kriegh View Post
    What is your point. The 2011 NEC requires AFCI protection on all circuits in a dining room, and that there would include the SABCs.

    210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.
    (A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms,
    parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.
    The 2008 NEC requires the same AFCI protection for dining room SABC:
    - 210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.
    - - (B) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  12. #77
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: Dedicated 20A Kitchen circuit

    Back to the OP: After seeing the report, the inspector assumed the dining room was wired with the 15A (14ga) living room circuit and protected with a 20A breaker. It wasn't. Bad assumption and didn't take me but about 2 minutes to verify 12ga wire for the circuit in question. The report was worded in a way that made it a somewhat confusing statement of a deficiency that required repair.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •