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Thread: Mystery...

  1. #1
    Ron Bishop's Avatar
    Ron Bishop Guest

    Default Mystery...

    Anybody have a clue why this breaker feeds back to the busbar kike it does?

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  2. #2

    Default Re: Mystery...

    It is supplying power to the lower branch circuits/ lower bus bar.
    The breakers look like Federal Pacific breakers and that is pretty typical for their panels.
    I am sure you are aware of concerns with FP breakers/ panels.


  3. #3
    Ron Bishop's Avatar
    Ron Bishop Guest

    Default Re: Mystery...

    aaahhh...that explains it. Yes it is Federal Pacific, and I am aware of the problems. Thank you kindly.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Mystery...

    A nice clear picture of that setup:

    http://www.inspect-ny.com/fpe/stlou022.gif

    BTW,, the latest version (May 2007) of J. Arnstein's white paper on FPE products is here:

    http://www.inspect-ny.com/fpe/FPECir...ards070525.PDF


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,308

    Default Re: Mystery...

    That's called a 'split bus panel', typically used as "service equipment" with the 'panel' being the lower section of it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    2,797

    Default Re: Mystery...

    From that last link abov e:

    This document has been revised at this time for two major reasons. First, in a class-action lawsuit against FPE/Reliance in New Jersey, the Court found that Federal Pacific Electric Co. (FPE) committed fraud by representing that their FPE Stab-LokŪ circuit breakers met the applicable (UL) standard test requirements when in fact they did not. The Court’s finding of fraud, published in 2005, indicates that FPE cheated on the tests that were required to obtain and maintain UL listings. The company improperly applied UL labels to circuit breakers that could not and did not meet the UL requirements. FPE covered up the defective performance of the circuit breakers by a long-standing practice of fraudulent testing. The Court's finding helps resolve the question as to how the defective breakers got into the marketplace and into homes.

    Secondly, the recent testing of FPE Stab-LokŪ circuit breakers now includes breakers from 28 homes across the Country. The number of breakers tested is about double the number included in the tabulation of the original report. The results firmly support - to an even higher level of statistical certainty - the conclusion that virtually every FPE Stab-LokŪ panel installed in homes today contains circuit breakers that are seriously defective, and that they should be replaced in the interest of electrical and fire safety."


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