Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Gerald Wilcox's Avatar
    Gerald Wilcox Guest

    Default Aluminum branch wiring?

    I believe that the older conductors near the center of the pic are aluminum branch wiring. I see no evidence that this is tinned copper. Only one circuit in panel was like this, although there is some evidence of k&t left in the residence. Would you agree?
    Thanks

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    Looks like tinned copper conductors with rubber insulation.

    Nothing wrong with the tinned copper, the problem is that the rubber insulation is likely dried out and no longer sufficiently effective as insulation if one were to test.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
    Posts
    5,005

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    The bare ground wire sure looks like Alu.


  4. #4
    Gerald Wilcox's Avatar
    Gerald Wilcox Guest

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    Thanks Jerry, I may have been overly concerned,on the ungrounded conductor where the insulation was stripped off and the conductor was exposed, at the point where the stripping tool marks were observed, I didn't see any copper.........The point you made on the insulation is well taken.


  5. #5
    Robert Meier's Avatar
    Robert Meier Guest

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    Looks like tinned copper to me too.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    I see copper, tinned copper, but no solid Al. The stranded range circuit ground is not clear, but those are old cloth-covered conductors, and we're not concerned about the stranded stuff anyway.

    Sometimes the camera flash can wash out the copper color and make you panicky after the fact.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ridgewood, NJ
    Posts
    237

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    Gerald, how old do you think that wiring is with the cloth wrap?


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    579

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    It's tinned copper. Aluminum branch circuit wiring will have plastic sheathing like modern Romex.


  9. #9
    Gerald Wilcox's Avatar
    Gerald Wilcox Guest

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    Thanks for all the help! > Neal it's hard to say, it's the only conductor left at the panel not upgraded, not counting the stove. The panel was upgraded as well........my guess is the 40's. Trent makes a good point about the insulation being plastic on solid aluminum conductors.


  10. #10
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
    Garry Blankenship Guest

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    I would not agree. Someone here may know for sure, but during the time period of rubber insulated conductors, ( RH, RHW etc ), with that cross link or weaved jacket were in use I do not think aluminum conductors were available. Making aluminum requires a lot of power and we did not have enough electrical capacity then for adequate mass production of aluminum wire. I cannot say it was never made, but I have never seen aluminum conductors insulated like that. 10 to 1 that those conductors are tinned copper.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wenatchee Wa
    Posts
    301

    Default Re: Aluminum branch wiring?

    Like Trent stated I look at what the sheathing is. This looks like tinned wires to me also. Not uncommon in that 40's era.

    They tinned them to prevent the reaction between the copper and the sulfur in the rubber which caused corrosion. Also the copper would adversely effect the rubber. Sort of a win win.

    They still use tinned wiring in electronics and marine applications. FWIW

    Last edited by Don Hester; 04-16-2012 at 10:12 AM. Reason: typo
    Don Hester
    NCW Home Inspections, LLC
    Wa. St. Licensed H I #647, WSDA #80050, http://www.ncwhomeinspections.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •