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Thread: Jumper in panel

  1. #1
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Jumper in panel

    House built in the Late 70's. This is the service disconnect/ distribution panel on the exterior. This has been kicked around before. I don't have a clear understanding if this is correct and the purpose for the jumper.

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  2. #2
    Stephen G's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Just had one monday. An 8AWG cable was run from the main to a sub. The breaker in the sub was 100amp; the breaker in the main was 20amp. The 8awg wont screw down in the 20amp breaker, so they pigtailed it with 12awg to fit.
    Called it and everything else out, sparky will be making a house call.


    Quote Originally Posted by mathew stouffer View Post
    House built in the Late 70's. This is the service disconnect/ distribution panel on the exterior. This has been kicked around before. I don't have a clear understanding if this is correct and the purpose for the jumper.



  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Mathew, do you mean the black jumper connecting the 2 terminals on the GFI breaker? I don't know.

    Do you mean the jumper on the neutrals? Sure, he's reducing the size of the neutral so that both are equal in size at the breaker.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen G View Post
    Just had one monday. An 8AWG cable was run from the main to a sub. The breaker in the sub was 100amp; the breaker in the main was 20amp. The 8awg wont screw down in the 20amp breaker, so they pigtailed it with 12awg to fit.
    Called it and everything else out, sparky will be making a house call.
    That might be OK, if the correct connector was used at the jumper. It is a 20 amp su su remote panel with a large disconnect switch.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Early ITE GFCI circuit breakers did not have a lug for the neutral, one had to use a wire connector to connect the neutral, not sure of what am seeing with the red conductor.


  6. #6
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
    Garry Blankenship Guest

    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    I assume you talking about that C/B jumper wire. Too much value added effort for a H.I., but you could research that GFI C/B by mfg & date and possibly determine how it is correctly terminated. My recommendation would be to test the GFI test button. If it trips and resets, I'd still question the appearence of the terminations for referral to a pro.


  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Might be part of the GFI breaker circuitry. Early Cutler-Hammer had a similar jumper.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  8. #8
    Robert Meier's Avatar
    Robert Meier Guest

    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    Might be part of the GFI breaker circuitry. Early Cutler-Hammer had a similar jumper.
    My thought as well, looks to be integral to the construction of the CB.


  9. #9
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    The black jumper on the GFCI breaker. The breaker tripped with tested at the outlet. Just was not clear why this is installed an if it is acceptable.


  10. #10
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    Maryland
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    Default Re: Jumper in panel

    Like Robert and I said, it may be part of the breaker.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

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