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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Washington
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    70

    Default Anti-trip bracket?

    What is the function of the small metal bracket pictured here above the top left breaker? The bracket had a metal arm that could rotate left to right. In one position it had no effect on the trip lever, in the other, it held the breaker into the "on" position. This home had it on 5 breaker locations. Set to resist the water heater circuit breaker from tripping.
    Thanks.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
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    4,546

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    I believe those breakers will still trip internally if the handle is locked in the 'on' position. The lock would prevent resetting of a tripped breaker.
    I don't know why anyone would want that feature.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NY State
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    440

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Breaker locks are included in every LOTO (lock out, tag out) kit.
    Also things like emergency/exit lights, night lights, etc, in commercial spaces many time will require a breaker locked in the on position.
    Most are just like that (where you only remove the clip) so as not to inadvertently shut off a circuit, some like the LOTO ones can accept a pad lock for safety in keeping a circuit off.

    The reiterate, NONE of these will prevent a breaker from tripping. There is NO SUCH thing as an "anti-trip" device. That would be kind of counter productive, wouldn't it?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Tennessee
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    60

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Looks like an OSHA "lock out-tag out". Nice but not really required in residential.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Horn View Post
    Looks like an OSHA "lock out-tag out". Nice but not really required in residential.
    Really depends on the AHJ for the area..... Lock-outs are required in my area for the dishwasher and the water heater if they do not have a disconnect at the appliance.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
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    60

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    We are required a disconnect with in "eye site" of the appliance. Water heaters and HVAC specifically. Lock-out breakers are also code in the city but I seldom see them. I have not called out if the disconnect is in place. Maybe I should.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
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    421

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    At first I was looking at the bracket on the main (which is actually a buss bar), so I wasn't following the comments...duh!
    FYI, ITE also had this dual or parallel main breaker back when,,: the setup doubles the AIC rating.

    Now that I'm hip to what the OP was questioning and others have answered, I can add to intelligently, I hope.
    Notice the re-identified conductor on said breaker. This is a professional job.
    The double-pole 30amp breaker could be powering a water heater without a disconnect in sight, or, a stackable washer/dryer that is shoe-horned into a cubby hole with the receptacle buried behind it -too hard to slide out for servicing & controls accessible from the front.

    A typical oversight in my jurisdiction would be the well and a mechanical timer for a sign.
    Note that the lockable means has to be ahead of a controller.
    The controller for the well is the pressure switch, and the device (well motor) is outside.
    Outdoor signs require a disconnect in sight. A mechanical timer (time clock) can be turned off in the timer however, if the power ahead of the timer is not shut/locked out, the motor will continue to turn and eventually turn the power back on. The time clock is the controller for the sign and the lock out would normally be ahead, such as on the breaker.

    Off topic;, There is a new heating contractor in town and my first few inspections of new or replaced furnaces did not have a bushing of some sort
    connecting the disconnect switch box to the furnace. We know that on replacement jobs, the installer is not the electrician. This is an easy check... just remove the switch cover.
    Shorting/grounding is especially hazardous when near a gas appliance.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Washington
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    70

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Just want to clarify:

    The subject breaker handle can be mechanically held in place (circuit is "on) by the lock-out device arm and the circuit will still be safely broken?

    In a lock-out/tag-out scenario, the point is to ensure that the circuit breaker does not accidentally get switched on by another person while work is being performed on said circuit/ device away from the panel?


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Horn View Post
    Looks like an OSHA "lock out-tag out". Nice but not really required in residential.
    Not "required" in residential, but certainly an option suitable for many appliances instead of having a disconnect within sight of the appliance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Horn View Post
    We are required a disconnect with in "eye site" of the appliance. Water heaters and HVAC specifically.
    HVAC is not allowed to have those installed instead of a disconnect within sight of the appliance (the air handler or the condenser unit) - HVAC is required to have the disconnect within sight of ... those are not allowed.

    As the others above have said, they do not keep a breaker from tripping, they can, with the breaker off and a lock in them, keep a breaker from being turned on.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Charlotte NC
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    2,303

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Luc V. L. View Post
    Just want to clarify:

    The subject breaker handle can be mechanically held in place (circuit is "on) by the lock-out device arm and the circuit will still be safely broken?

    In a lock-out/tag-out scenario, the point is to ensure that the circuit breaker does not accidentally get switched on by another person while work is being performed on said circuit/ device away from the panel?
    If the breaker was "off" wouldn't the device also hold it in the "off" position?

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
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    421

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    If I'm understanding your question Vern: Yes the device is normally meant to lock out as opposed to locked on.
    I'm not so sure that all pad-lockable breaker clips will allow the lock on option??
    I use the term pad-lockable because some confuse the term 'breaker clip' with the set screw type 'lock on' device. The set screw type is used, for instance, to lock on a branch circuit suppling power to emergency & exit lights or to keep employees from turning off the computers, time clocks, ETC.


  12. #12
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
    Garry Blankenship Guest

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Deleted, sorry.

    Last edited by Garry Blankenship; 08-18-2012 at 10:53 PM. Reason: Error

  13. #13
    Dennis Webber's Avatar
    Dennis Webber Guest

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    HVAC is not allowed to have those installed instead of a disconnect within sight of the appliance (the air handler or the condenser unit) - HVAC is required to have the disconnect within sight of ... those are not allowed.
    The way I understand it, Section 430.102(B)(2), exception allows locking the circuit breaker for both 430.102(A) & 430.102(B).


  14. #14
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Webber View Post
    The way I understand it, Section 430.102(B)(2), exception allows locking the circuit breaker for both 430.102(A) & 430.102(B).
    Go to 440.14.

    - 440.14 Location.
    - - Disconnecting means shall be located within sight from and readily accessible from the air-conditioning or refrigerating equipment. The disconnecting means shall be permitted to be installed on or within the air-conditioning or refrigerating equipment.
    - - The disconnecting means shall not be located on panels that are designed to allow access to the air-conditioning or refrigeration equipment or to obscure the equipment nameplate(s).
    - - - Exception No. 1: Where the disconnecting means provided in accordance with 430.102(A) is capable of being locked in the open position, and the refrigerating or air-conditioning equipment is essential to an industrial process in a facility with written safety procedures, and where the conditions of maintenance and supervision ensure that only qualified persons service the equipment, a disconnecting means within sight from the equipment shall not be required. The provision for locking or adding a lock to the disconnecting means shall be installed on or at the switch or circuit breaker and shall remain in place with or without the lock installed.
    - - - Exception No. 2: Where an attachment plug and receptacle serve as the disconnecting means in accordance with 440.13, their location shall be accessible but shall not be required to be readily accessible.
    - - FPN: See Parts VII and IX of Article 430 for additional requirements.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  15. #15
    Dennis Webber's Avatar
    Dennis Webber Guest

    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Thanks Jerry.

    You could have just given me the code reference and saved yourself a lot of typing. What bothers me is that I know this, and for the life of me forgot it.
    I do thank you however, sometimes I need a little reminding.

    Sigh, can I claim age :-)1
    - or should that be :-(
    Dennis


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Anti-trip bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Webber View Post
    You could have just given me the code reference and saved yourself a lot of typing.
    Dennis,

    No problem with providing the code itself: a) not everyone would be able to look up the code reference to see what it says; b) I have the code electronically on my computer as well as the book and the Handbook.

    We all forget things at times ... what were we talking about?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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