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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
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    Default 220V - double tap

    Sq "D" breaker 2-pole double tap.

    I understand that Sq "D" manufacturer allows two wires under its termination point, but is it allowed at a 220V breaker?

    I know that each branch wire feeds a separate electrical strip heater in separate areas of the home. I didn't look at the rating of the heaters (and don't want or need to), but would you write it up for further evaluation as a potential overload problem or just keep your mouth shut.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Maryland
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    Default Re: 220V - double tap

    The Square D breakers in 15 and 20 amp sizes are listed for use with two conductors, regardless of being single or double pole. I think it looks like the breakers are 15 and 20 amp so there is no issue.

    BTW, it is 120 and 240.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: 220V - double tap

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Amelin View Post
    I know that each branch wire feeds a separate electrical strip heater in separate areas of the home. I didn't look at the rating of the heaters (and don't want or need to), ...
    The breaker will still trip at 20 amps (looks like it says 20 amps on it), but are those conductors #12 AWG? They look kinda small.

    As Jim said, 120 volt / 240 volts (been a very long time since it was 110 volt / 220 volt ) and those terminals have two terminals built into them, so there is but one conductor in each actual terminal as that plate is made for one conductor on one side or one conductor on each side - however, putting two conductors on one side would not be acceptable.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Southern Vancouver Island
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    4,549

    Default Re: 220V - double tap

    While it is not wrong, it points to an amateur installation or actually two installations of heating devices which can burn houses down.
    If you think it is an upgrade or the result of a renovation, then good chance it was not installed by a professional electrician.

    In my area, a #14 copper conductor can be on a 20 amp breaker, but only if it is a fixed load, such as for baseboard heaters. The total load still must not exceed 15 amps.
    You could have gone around and totaled up the loads on all the circuits. But there could be heaters hidden behind storage in other rooms daisy-chained to those circuits. That is why an electrician should do the installation.

    You can judge the wattage of a baseboard heater by its length. A 1500 watt heater will be twice the length of a 750 watt unit.

    Last edited by John Kogel; 09-05-2012 at 09:02 AM.
    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  5. #5
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
    Garry Blankenship Guest

    Default Re: 220V - double tap

    Assuming the terminations are approved for two wires, it's fine. What H.I.s refer to as a "Double Tap" is just another splice. Illegal splice, if on the wrong breaker, but still just a splice. B/B heat is typically 250 watts per lineal foot. 208 volt baseboards would be a problem in a residence - - - but not for very long.


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