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  1. #1
    Al Cummings's Avatar
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    Default Kitchen Island Counter

    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    My condensed version is 24", ( actually 12" x 24" ), or greater requires at least one receptacle. If the island is "separated" by an appliance, ( sink, cook-top, refer, etc. ), it is considered two islands and the 12" x 24" or greater applies for each space, ( side ). Beyond that, normal spacing applies, ( no point can be more than 6' from a receptacle ).


  3. #3
    Mark Kittle's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    In kitchen countertop applications receptacle outlets can be spaced no more than 48", not 6'.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Cummings View Post
    How many outlets are required under the latest code?
    It really depends on your location and as to what Code is being used. Is it an island or part of the countertop? Does it have an overhang? If so what is the size of the overhang. Is that island fixed or can it be moved?

    Where are you located.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    Short answer, at least one.
    Hmmm. Not so fast. May be NONE required. Not all kitchen island counters require - i.e. furniture.

    None, if the kitchen island counter is not afixed or permanently mounted and has no attchment to systems within or upon. - i.e. on casters, a placed furniture island, etc.

    One receptacle minimum, an "installed" kitchen island, minimum for any unbroken or contiguous space if the surface space meets the minimum requirements,

    Two, for an "installed", afixed, or "too large to be considered mobile or furniture" kitchen island countertop, which is the ONLY qualified kitchen "countertop" in the entire kitchen. May be at a shared location, such as each half of a duplex receptacle with the tabs removed and each individual receptacle "half" is supplied separately by the two minimum required small appliance circuits required to serve kitchen countertop(s) (but not required to be exclusively serving kitchen countertops, just dedicated to SA outlets).

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-10-2012 at 04:29 PM.

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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    The question is about an island. One is the minimum required.
    None may be required.

    If the kitchen island is the only kitchen countertop, and same is required to be supplied with receptacle outlets - Two receptacles (even a duplex receptacle with tabs removed, each "half" supplied separately by the two required SA circuits) may be required. If the kitchen island space is not contiguous and each "broken" space minimum requires an outlet more than one outlet location may be required.


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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    If the island fits these dimension at least one receptacle is required.
    If the Island is not permanent nor afixed, and has no installed connection to systems or surfaces, it does not require any receptacle outlet (i.e. free-standing furniture!)


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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    (for clarification)
    (I added bold for highlighting)
    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    None may be required.

    If the kitchen island is the only kitchen countertop, and same is required to be supplied with receptacle outlets - Two receptacles (even a duplex receptacle with tabs removed, each "half" supplied separately by the two required SA circuits) may be required. If the kitchen island space is not contiguous and each "broken" space minimum requires an outlet more than one outlet location may be required.
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    If the island fits these dimension at least one receptacle is required.
    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    If the Island is not permanent nor afixed, and has no installed connection to systems or surfaces, it does not require any receptacle outlet (i.e. it is considered to be "placed" furniture!)
    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    None may be required.
    "If the kitchen island is the only kitchen countertop, and same is required to be supplied with receptacle outlets - Two receptacles (even a duplex receptacle with tabs removed, each "half" supplied separately by the two required SA circuits) may be required"

    Incorrect, "shall be required" as a minimum.

    "If the kitchen island space is not contiguous and each "broken" space minimum requires an outlet more than one outlet location may be required."

    Correct, "may be required" in addition to the "shall be required" receptacle outlets, "may be required" because you did not specify that the countertop width is less than 12".

    If the countertop space behind item IS less than 12" wide (this is the part which was not specified), then the answer would be "shall be required" in addition to the other "shall be required" receptacle outlets as the code now considers the countertop to be two separate countertop areas.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    I don't see where the OP mentions anything about furniture. The NEC version of an island is what he's asking about
    The OP never mentioned the NEC either. The OP never indicated "Kitchen Island Counter" was an installed, afixed kitchen island either. The OP never indicated, other than "United States" as a location. The OP didn't indicate a "residential occupancy" kitchen, either. I might add, the OP hasn't indicated said "kitchen" is or isn't in a "manufactured home" either (again NEC is NOT "THE CODE" for within). "The NEC" is NOT the ONLY "Code" in the country, and is NOT the ONLY CODE which SPEAKS to the issues.

    YOU ASSUMED and tried to morph an ambiguous original post into your own "vision" of what the original poster did and did not ask about.

    It is quite legal and possible to have a kitchen with NO afixed cabinetry and NO "countertop spaces" requiring small appliance receptacles under the NEC or other "code".

    Think european style - quite popular with NYC flexible other loft space occupancies, esp. rentals, or ad pop culture - IKEA kitchen.

    European style you roll up or un-click the floor coverings too, all goes, including the appliances.

    The OP asked simply and only:


    Title: Kitchen Island Counter
    How many outlets are required under the latest code?
    The answer is, it is possible NONE are required, depending on the circumstances and conditions, and which code one is applying to same.

    You ASS-umed the rest.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-22-2012 at 06:24 PM.

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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    As usual you've taken a simple question and posted on an ELECTRICAL FORUM and twisted into some junk about furniture from Ikea. I'm surprised that anyone actually reads your drivel.
    Robert,

    Not to worry, he is on the ignore list of many, and many others simply ignore him without putting him on their ignore list.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    As usual you've taken a simple question and posted on an ELECTRICAL FORUM and twisted into some junk about furniture from Ikea. I'm surprised that anyone actually reads your drivel.
    Actually Robert Meier, its a HOME INSPECTION FORUM and the Electrical TOPIC/SUBJECT AREA of same, which btw, the NEC is not the ONLY, nor is it necessarily even THE code which governs same - as we do NOT know WHERE said "kitchen island counter" IS, that it is or is not installed, NOR that it "requires" electrification -- do you "get IT" yet? The OP has also NOT indicated NEW construction, modification, etc. either. The NEC does NOT dictate nor control furniture placement. Further, a "kitchen" is NOT NECESSARILY a "room" (it may be an "area") and does NOT necessarily require any partitioning or walls (i.e. "open plan") from habital or occupied space.

    THE answer to the OP is "it depends" and that NONE MAY BE REQUIRED BY ANY CODE!

    Your own short-sightedness is astounding. I simply gave you an example so that you might see (past your blinders) that you have made unjustified ASSUMPTIONS -- and that your arrogant and insulting, unjustified and non-professional ad-hominem attacks are beyond ignorant, childish, and stupendous. Salt and Pepper seasoning is freely available, and might make eating crow a bit easier.

    In actuallity, set-in-place, "DRY" kitchen island installations are quite common, and involve even the highest-end kitchen cabinetry, custom installations as additional, modifiable features; and have been and continue to be on the forefront of adaptable kitchen design, for the ever-changing, adaptability and longevity.

    Simple draw latch hardware, for example, is another technique for the reconfiguration (accessed from within/inside, one-side lapped mounding applied outside is one way to hide seams), and tops are often fastened from below inside and removable prior to relocating. Specified minor additional expense and planning on the forefront allows adaptability for the changing needs and desires for the occupants, and easier to modify, move, modify, reconfigure, etc. than a dining hutch, large dresser, etc.



    Modifyiable, adaptable design, is not a "new" concept - neither is the concept of "kitchen furniture".



    Neither any of the above nor any of following required (by the code) a single small appliance receptacle outlet to "serve" the "kitchen island (furniture) set-in-place supported "counter tops". Roll-in slide-in free-standing appliances 'garaged' underneath via floor box receptacles or a simple ped from below for the skinned (to match) wine cooler in next pic. unless afixed.






    The face applied (not floor pinned) quarter-round/shoe hides casters for mobility and hidden spring access side panel slots hide crank jack/screw up/down large footprint cushioned non-slip leveling legs in this mock-up, which can 'house' slid-in free-standing appliances, if desired, or additional cabinets/drawer units:




    Simple kitchen floor and wall cabinet with panels hardware conversion kit to furniture dry kitchen island or drybar set in place application.



    above are examples of set-in-place dry, non-electrified, perfectly 'legal' kitchen island counter(s).

    Next post ready-made furniture new-in-box off-the-shelf dry kitchen island furniture (one set & stools/chairs) examples.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-23-2012 at 11:35 AM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Ready-made furniture set in place - not affixed, not attached, able to be moved/removed, not attached or connected to building, structure, or any building "system". Two examples of sold assembled (one with seating) and two views of a nationally available RTA "euro style" dry kitchen island with one may or may not install retractable casters, which additionally affords a permanent install option.

    "Kitchen Island Counter"(s).

    Same as free-standing dry bars, tables, desks, and other furniture:

    No small appliance receptacles required even when set in place (not attached, latched, or connected to) and adjacent to 'installed' counters, appliances, or set under luminaires/lighting fixtures (just as setting a table under a suspended light fixture)!

    So R.M. you can continue on in your short-sighted, ignorant, assumptive, bull-headed or Muleish and warped path, or endeavor to "get it". The answer to the OPs question AS TITLED, PHRASED AND PRESENTED, is...It depends: NONE may be required - by ANY "code" regardless of size.





    "euro style" detached "dry" furniture island (RTA) with pendants dropped from above - two views:







    Furthermore, still legal to have a minimal kitchen area with nothing more than a sink, one or two less than 12" wide x minimal depth counter spaces adjacent, a minimal free-standing range and space for free-standing (even half-height) refrigerator qualified as a kitchen area - and one which would not require any counter top positioned small appliance receptacles -- for example as often found in minimal studio and student apartments - considing of nothing more than an installed, plumb-ed sink base cabinet, minimal countertop and dropped in sink.

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    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-23-2012 at 12:17 PM.

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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Again someone needs to try and one up someone and add confusion to the topic.


    I would not think that someone would ask if a movable island would need a receptacle.

    As far as the other styles shown I would not care if they were screwed, glued, pinned, nailed or held in place by a molding. I cannot think that many inspectors would not require at least one receptacle to serve it.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    Again someone needs to try and one up someone and add confusion to the topic.


    I would not think that someone would ask if a movable island would need a receptacle.

    As far as the other styles shown I would not care if they were screwed, glued, pinned, nailed or held in place by a molding. I cannot think that many inspectors would not require at least one receptacle to serve it.
    Since none of the above are pinned, glued, nailed, or held in place by anything other than their own weight and gravity, and are in no way afixed or connected to any part of the structure or any building system whatsoever, they require absolutely no receptacles.

    Just as a table, they are movable furniture. There is no requirement.

    Units are conjoined to each other but not to the building or its finishes.

    Any "inspector" who "requires" any receptacle is inventing - and has no basis for "requiring" anything. Home Inspectors do not "require" anything.


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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    I am sorry that you confused my use of the word inspector. I would have hoped that someone reading my reply would have been astute enough to know I meant an agent of the AHJ since the HI cannot require anything. Looks like I give some too much credit.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Have to love it when the simple is expanded.

    Could the OP have been an outside kitchen or maybe commercial?


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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    Have to love it when the simple is expanded.

    Could the OP have been an outside kitchen or maybe commercial?
    May have even been on a large yacht, or maybe the space station?

    May have even been next to that "sub" panel in Paul Allen's submarine.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Kitchen Island Counter

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    May have even been on a large yacht, or maybe the space station?

    May have even been next to that "sub" panel in Paul Allen's submarine.

    Those would have been galleys.


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