Results 1 to 27 of 27
  1. #1
    Kristian Keesling's Avatar
    Kristian Keesling Guest

    Default Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Hello everyone. I'm new to the forums, and am neither an inspector or contractor. I'm a do it yourselfer that cannot seem to find a straight answer to my question. I have an aerobic septic system (Aquaklear) which has an effluent tank with a pump. Since I purchased the house 9 years ago, I have had constant trouble with the pump/float switch/GFCI outlet. The pump is connected through a piggyback float switch into a GFCI outlet which is on a dedicated circuit. Nearly every time it rains, and until the ground has dried out, the GFCI outlet trips. I have replaced the pump 3 times in the last 9 years, and it seems to work fine for about a year, then it starts tripping the outlet. I had resigned myself to the fact that the pumps just didn't last very long and that they must develop some type of leakage/short because I could plug them into a non-GFCI outlet and they operated fine. I have also tested and replaced the GFCI outlet thinking that was the problem. Now, the problem is continuing, except it seems that the pump will operate fine on the GFCI outlet, but as soon as I plug in the float switch it trips. So, I am planning to replace the float switch. However, in researching, I have come across several articles that indicate there is an exception to the GFCI outlet requirement in the NEC of 2008 for single outlets which have a sewage lift pump connected. So, that made me think there must be some issue with GFCI outlets and sewage lift pumps. Therefore, I have two questions. 1. Is a GFCI outlet required by code for a sewage lift pump? (If the answer to this is yes, then there is no reason to answer the second question. I will not set it up in any manner that goes against code since I have no desire to increase liability for someone's injury on my property.) and 2. If it is not required, is it safe to have the pump plugged into a weatherproof electric box without the GFCI? I would love to not have to deal with the tripping of the GFCI outlet anymore. Sorry for the long post, but I wanted to give all the necessary information. Thanks, Kristian

    Similar Threads:
    Member Benefits1

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Kristian
    Thank you for asking
    I hope this helps
    Do not be concerned about code requirements. GFCI protection is needed, code or no code.
    Without GFCI protection you, anyone in your family, or a repair person could be in serious risk of a fatal shock.
    I know a tripping GFCI can be a pain, but you do have a problem, something IS causing the GFCI to trip.
    The GFCI is doing exactly what it is designed to do, protect you from electrical shock.
    Find and correct the problem, the pump, float switch, or even the wiring.
    Chances are extremely small that the GFCI is defective.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Kristian Keesling's Avatar
    Kristian Keesling Guest

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Rick,
    Thanks for the reply.
    You pretty much confirmed what I was already thinking. The idea of having an outlet outside, in the yard with electrical wires running from it into the ground with standing water doesn’t seem very safe without a GFCI outlet, as you said, regardless of the code. The problem must be with the float switch since the outlet trips every time I plug it in, but not with the pump plugged directly in. I’ll put a new float switch in, and hopefully it lasts longer that the previous repairs. It is definitely aggravating replacing pump parts every couple of years, but that is definitely better than someone getting electrocuted because of no GFCI.
    Thanks again for the advice.
    Kristian


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    Kristian
    Thank you for asking
    I hope this helps
    Do not be concerned about code requirements. GFCI protection is needed, code or no code.
    Without GFCI protection you, anyone in your family, or a repair person could be in serious risk of a fatal shock.
    I know a tripping GFCI can be a pain, but you do have a problem, something IS causing the GFCI to trip.
    The GFCI is doing exactly what it is designed to do, protect you from electrical shock.
    Find and correct the problem, the pump, float switch, or even the wiring.
    Chances are extremely small that the GFCI is defective.
    Kristan,

    I disagree with the response from Rick. First, NEVER ignore code! Second, while GFCI protection is required for most residential room locations it is not required in all situations. Please review NEC article 2 section 208 for the GFCI requirements.

    Now, Manufacturer's instructions trump NEC regulations for "Listed Products". If the pump or float switch call for a branch circuit that is not protected by GFCI, then that is what you need to follow.

    Also, if having a branch circuit that is protected by GFCY will cause more damage than without (effluent spillage) than you do not use the GFCI.

    My recommendation would be to talk to your state, county or city electrical inspectors to verify if they require a GFCI protected circuit for such a pump. If not, then place the circuit on a non protected, dedicated branch circuit.

    Your problem may be caused by the momentary inrush of current caused by the float switch making.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Meier View Post
    The requirement for GFCI protection is based on the location of the receptacle used for the pump. For a 120 volt pump GFCI protection is required for the receptacle in locations outlined in 210.8 it is not for the protection of the pump. If the pump were 240 volts no GFCI protection is required. The theory is that someone could unplug the 120 volt pump and use the receptacle. If the pump were in a finished portion of the structure then no GFCI protection for the receptacle is required.

    OK, The issue here is the requirement for GFCI protection. Again, if the damage resulting from an effluent pump failure is greater than the GFCI protection or the manufacturer requires a branch circuit that does not use GFCI protection, then you physically protect the circuit receptacl fro tampering with it and install a non GFCI receptacle on a dedicated circuit.

    Common sense - If the GFCI receptacle or breaker trip every time the pressure switch makes, no effluent will be pumped away from the residence and eventually the effluent will drain back into the residence.

    Please check with your Local Authority Having Jurisdiction and or the manufacturer of the pump and switch.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    I'm not sure where some are getting the 'you can ignore the NEC even if a GFCI protected receptacle outlet is required' if there is a problem - the fact that 'there is a problem' is precisely WHY the receptacle outlet is required to have GFCI protection.

    Here is 210.8 from the 2008 NEC, ANY receptacle outlet in the following locations are required to have GFCI protection unless SPECIFICALLY excepted out (and there are not many which are specifically excepted out)
    - 210.8
    - - (A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in (1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. - - - (1) Bathrooms
    - - - (2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use
    - - - (3) Outdoors
    - - - - Exception to (3): Receptacles that are not readily accessible and are supplied by a dedicated branch circuit for electric snow-melting or deicing equipment shall be permitted to be installed in accordance with 426.28.
    - - - (4) Crawl spaces — at or below grade level
    - - - (5) Unfinished basements — for purposes of this section, unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like
    - - - - Exception to (5): A receptacle supplying only a permanently installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system shall not be required to have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection.
    - - - - - FPN: See 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) for power supply requirements for fire alarm systems.
    - - - - - Receptacles installed under the exception to 210.8(A)(5) shall not be considered as meeting the requirements of 210.52(G).
    - - - (6) Kitchens — where the receptacles are installed to serve the countertop surfaces
    - - - (7) Laundry, utility, and wet bar sinks — where the receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside edge of the sink
    - - - (8) Boathouses

    If the receptacle is 'outdoors', and the receptacle *is not for snow-melting or deicing equipment*, then the receptacle requires GFCI protection. As stated by some above - the GFCI protection is not to protect the pump, the GFCI protection is there to protect you, your family, the service people who come to service it, and any other person who might come into contact with it while it is in a fault condition.

    If something gets wet, damp or moist every time it rains and causes a problem - look at that item and see if it is installed properly, if it is cord and plug connected check to see if the cord and plug are rated for outdoor use (there are things which are typically installed "outdoors" yet come with cords which are rated for "dry locations" only ... also check to see if they are properly wired.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Md and or PA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    This situation needs to be looked into by a professional who has the advantage of actually having eyes and hands on the set up.

    The Original poster should contact a licensed ,qualified professional or at the very least consult the Inspection department and speak with the proper inspector. He should NOT just look for a way to eliminate the GFCI protection.

    Like others have said you can not blindly eliminate the GFCI if it is in areas requiring GFCI protection!


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Farrell View Post
    Also, if having a branch circuit that is protected by GFCY will cause more damage than without (effluent spillage) than you do not use the GFCI.
    What a crock of .... effluent.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    440

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    What a crock of .... effluent.
    So is saying: "Do not be concerned about code requirements. GFCI protection is needed, code or no code."

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian Keesling View Post
    Hello everyone. I'm new to the forums, and am neither an inspector or contractor. I'm a do it yourselfer that cannot seem to find a straight answer to my question. I have an aerobic septic system (Aquaklear) which has an effluent tank with a pump. Since I purchased the house 9 years ago, I have had constant trouble with the pump/float switch/GFCI outlet. The pump is connected through a piggyback float switch into a GFCI outlet which is on a dedicated circuit. Nearly every time it rains, and until the ground has dried out, the GFCI outlet trips. I have replaced the pump 3 times in the last 9 years, and it seems to work fine for about a year, then it starts tripping the outlet. I had resigned myself to the fact that the pumps just didn't last very long and that they must develop some type of leakage/short because I could plug them into a non-GFCI outlet and they operated fine. I have also tested and replaced the GFCI outlet thinking that was the problem. Now, the problem is continuing, except it seems that the pump will operate fine on the GFCI outlet, but as soon as I plug in the float switch it trips. So, I am planning to replace the float switch. However, in researching, I have come across several articles that indicate there is an exception to the GFCI outlet requirement in the NEC of 2008 for single outlets which have a sewage lift pump connected. So, that made me think there must be some issue with GFCI outlets and sewage lift pumps. Therefore, I have two questions. 1. Is a GFCI outlet required by code for a sewage lift pump? (If the answer to this is yes, then there is no reason to answer the second question. I will not set it up in any manner that goes against code since I have no desire to increase liability for someone's injury on my property.) and 2. If it is not required, is it safe to have the pump plugged into a weatherproof electric box without the GFCI? I would love to not have to deal with the tripping of the GFCI outlet anymore. Sorry for the long post, but I wanted to give all the necessary information. Thanks, Kristian
    I would have a professional come out and hard wire the pump and float. This will eliminate the GFI requirement and tripping problem.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    What a crock of .... effluent.
    Rick all effluent aside, I just realized a significant typo error on my part. When I referenced a dedicated branch circuit, I forgot to include the removal of the receptacle with a direct pull to the pump and switch circuirity. Old Fa*t syndrom.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Guelph,Ontario
    Posts
    169

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    For the same reason we do not put a freezer on a GFCI circuit,we should not put the pump on this type of outlet,other wise you might have the house full of xxxx


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Janssen View Post
    For the same reason we do not put a freezer on a GFCI circuit,we should not put the pump on this type of outlet,other wise you might have the house full of xxxx
    Hello Harry from Ontario. I have noticed a few comments from you that reflect knowledge of Canadian codes. If you were to say something like "In Canada, we are not required to blah blah blah...", it would be more clear where you are coming from.

    All outdoor receptacles in Canada and the US are required to be GFCI protected. Hard wiring is certainly an option, and maybe the best one.

    Our American neighbours have some freedoms we don't have, but in terms of GFCI's and AFCI's, they have more restrictions. In Canada, the rules governing service entry are more strict, but some of the branch circuit rules are less strict.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    I'm almost surprised nobody suggested using an extension cord plugged into an unprotected outlet.
    That won't correct the fault but it will spot the tripping.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Guelph,Ontario
    Posts
    169

    Smile Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Hello Harry from Ontario. I have noticed a few comments from you that reflect knowledge of Canadian codes. If you were to say something like "In Canada, we are not required to blah blah blah...", it would be more clear where you are coming from.

    All outdoor receptacles in Canada and the US are required to be GFCI protected. Hard wiring is certainly an option, and maybe the best one.

    Our American neighbours have some freedoms we don't have, but in terms of GFCI's and AFCI's, they have more restrictions. In Canada, the rules governing service entry are more strict, but some of the branch circuit rules are less strict.
    John,yes in Canada,outdoor outlets are required to be GFCI protected,but fridge and freezer outlets are not,the reason is self explanatory,best wishes from Ontario,I have some family in BC,it truly is a beautiful province, and I have visited it at least 25 times or more.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    I would have a professional come out and hard wire the pump and float. This will eliminate the GFI requirement and tripping problem.
    That will do two things, yes, as it will eliminate the GFCI requirement and it will eliminate the GFCI from tripping ... but ... it may not do anything about WHY the GFCI is tripping and thus may not address the real issue nor keep anyone from being shocked or electrocuted.

    I was surprised to see you post that.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Janssen View Post
    For the same reason we do not put a freezer on a GFCI circuit,we should not put the pump on this type of outlet,other wise you might have the house full of xxxx
    If your appliances are like ours, then there is nothing wrong with having the freezer plugged into a GFCI protected receptacle. In fact, it is required if in a garage.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Appliances on dedicated plugs do not require GFCI protection, Look at your washer and dryer plugs in the laundry, they are right next to a water source and are not GFCI protected nor are they required to be, Look at the disposal plug under the kitchen sink that is right under supply and drain water sources with no GFCI requirement, stove, fridge. How about a lawn sprinkler system plugged into the outlet in garage with no GFCI protection, the garage door opener, should I go on? Use some common sense here folks and remove the GFCI outlet. I haven't seen the exact application but I think I may be on to something here.


  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,898

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Starkey View Post
    Appliances on dedicated plugs do not require GFCI protection, Look at your washer and dryer plugs in the laundry, they are right next to a water source and are not GFCI protected nor are they required to be, Look at the disposal plug under the kitchen sink that is right under supply and drain water sources with no GFCI requirement, stove, fridge. How about a lawn sprinkler system plugged into the outlet in garage with no GFCI protection, the garage door opener, should I go on? Use some common sense here folks and remove the GFCI outlet. I haven't seen the exact application but I think I may be on to something here.
    You should review the latest couple of code cycles. GFI protection requirements have had several changes, including the removal of single receptacles exemptions, garage door openers and more.

    The latest ones require ALL 120 volt 15 and 20 amp, including ceiling mounted receptacles in garages, and crawlspaces and unfinished basements to be GFI protected. Also the laundry if within 6' of a sink or laundry tub.

    Suggesting that someone remove required protection instead of fixing the problem is not the way to go nor do I think it is the responsible one.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    You should review the latest couple of code cycles. GFI protection requirements have had several changes, including the removal of single receptacles exemptions, garage door openers and more.

    The latest ones require ALL 120 volt 15 and 20 amp, including ceiling mounted receptacles in garages, and crawlspaces and unfinished basements to be GFI protected. Also the laundry if within 6' of a sink or laundry tub.

    Suggesting that someone remove required protection instead of fixing the problem is not the way to go nor do I think it is the responsible one.
    I'm not a code inspector first of all but your telling me the washing machine, fridge, stove, garbage disposal all now have to be on a GFCI protected circuit? I find that very hard to believe but will look into it. I go buy what TREC say's not so much what current building codes require. If the GFCI is tripping and shutting off an appliance, its a problem. I would write that up and refer them to a license electrician, that's what I would put on the report. Verbal advice is just that, verbal.


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Know that GFCI outlets can go bad. All the troubleshooting in the world of devices downstream of a failing GFCI will not help you or your wallet..


  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,898

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    When the ones built to the newer standard go bad they fail in the off position. When the older ones failed you lost the protection but the power stayed on.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    440

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Starkey View Post
    Appliances on dedicated plugs do not require GFCI protection, Look at your washer and dryer plugs in the laundry, they are right next to a water source and are not GFCI protected nor are they required to be, Look at the disposal plug under the kitchen sink that is right under supply and drain water sources with no GFCI requirement, stove, fridge. How about a lawn sprinkler system plugged into the outlet in garage with no GFCI protection, the garage door opener, should I go on? Use some common sense here folks and remove the GFCI outlet. I haven't seen the exact application but I think I may be on to something here.
    WOW! There is SO much wrong here it's not even funny.
    I sincerely hope this is not the kind of advice you give your customers.


  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    WOW! There is SO much wrong here it's not even funny.
    I sincerely hope this is not the kind of advice you give your customers.
    I don't give advice about these areas not having GFCI outlets but I don't write them up as in need of repair either nor have I ever once seen any of these plugs I mentioned on a GFCI circuit, even the last couple of new houses I did last month none of them were.


  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    As Pete said, way too much wrong with this information, so I will only address a few of the things stated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Starkey View Post
    Appliances on dedicated plugs do not require GFCI protection,
    Incorrect.

    How about a lawn sprinkler system plugged into the outlet in garage with no GFCI protection, the garage door opener, should I go on?
    It is obvious that you know absolutely NOTHING about the code requirements for GFCI protection, and you will likely respond that 'you are not a code inspector ... ' in which case you SHOULD NOT be telling people NOT TO HAVE GFCI protection where GFCI protection is required. Sheesh! Scary ... REAL scary!

    Use some common sense here folks and remove the GFCI outlet.
    Yes USE SOME COMMON SENSE and stop telling people to remove protection which may well save their life.

    Holy Cow, are you for real?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    My house is on an aerobic septic system and its not GFCI protected in anyway, there are no outlets as its hard wired to a sub panel above the pump with the breakers. I have never seen any of the areobic systems I have looked at on any kind of GFCI outlet or breaker to this day. I live in aerobic septic country. Not sure of your set up but perhaps you can trace it back to the main panel or sub and put in a GFCI breaker and hard wire it from there.

    I don't claim to know specific aerobic electric codes as I don't do aerobic septic inspections but I know I have never seen one on any kind of GFCI before so maybe this is something new which wouldn't surprise me one bit.

    Aerobic pumps should run continually 24/7 and if the pump stops an alarm sounds, doesn't seem like something you would want on a GFCI protected circuit to me any more then your AC unit outside or is that next?

    All the areobic systems I have seen are not something you can walk up to and just start sticking your hands in to where you could get electrocuted, its something you have to work at, the lid over the tank is concrete and heavy or its screwed on, the sub panel at the pump takes a special tool to open etc so again where does the GFCI come in to play in this type of situation? I think maybe you guy's just don't under stand the set up or maybe I'm just a fool who knows nothing!


  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Starkey View Post
    I think maybe you guy's just don't under stand the set up or maybe I'm just a fool who knows nothing!
    Well ...

    (I've added bold to show you what WE are talking about, now, wit regard to that last part you added about "maybe I'm just a fool who knows nothing" ... I AM NOT GOING THERE! )

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian Keesling View Post
    I have an aerobic septic system (Aquaklear) which has an effluent tank with a pump. Since I purchased the house 9 years ago, I have had constant trouble with the pump/float switch/GFCI outlet. The pump is connected through a piggyback float switch into a GFCI outlet which is on a dedicated circuit. Nearly every time it rains, and until the ground has dried out, the GFCI outlet trips. I have replaced the pump 3 times in the last 9 years, and it seems to work fine for about a year, then it starts tripping the outlet. I had resigned myself to the fact that the pumps just didn't last very long and that they must develop some type of leakage/short because I could plug them into a non-GFCI outlet and they operated fine. I have also tested and replaced the GFCI outlet thinking that was the problem. Now, the problem is continuing, except it seems that the pump will operate fine on the GFCI outlet, but as soon as I plug in the float switch it trips. So, I am planning to replace the float switch. However, in researching, ... blah, blah, blah ...
    The GFCI outlet was mentioned by the original poster, thus the GFCI outlet is what was being discussed ...

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    440

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Starkey View Post

    I don't claim to know specific aerobic electric codes as I don't do aerobic septic inspections but I know I have never seen one on any kind of GFCI before so maybe this is something new which wouldn't surprise me one bit.
    That's because there is NO such thing as an "aerobic electric code".

    In fact, I just did a search of the NEC and the word aerobic does NOT even exist anywhere in the text.

    You are overthinking things.


  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Effluent Pump - GFCI Outlet

    Kristian,

    I cant answer exactly why you are having to replace your effluent pump so often. I am a Texas licensed septic installer and have installed many aerobic systems and also perform aerobic maintenance/repairs. As such I would definitely say your setup is entirely incorrect. I would say that is for Texas only except that Aerobic System Manufacturers sell there systems not in just a single state, but any state in which they can find a distributor. Then the systems are tweaked to state requirements.

    I install/maintain several brands of aerobic systems. They all have control panels. Every effluent pump is hard wired into the control panel. They all have floats that are an individual component that is wired in. At least one float for the pump. Sometimes two floats for the pump. And one alarm float. Never do manufactures include a pump such as you have described that has the piggy back float. I use that type of pump often as a drop in emergency pump for a temporary solution if the normal submersble pumps are out of stock or on weekends when the supply house is closed. The system contol panels have 3 breakers. 1 for water pump. 1 for air pump. 1 for the alarm. Control panels are either monted onto the house are mounted in some way at the tank and they are hard wired into a dedicated house circuit. I have taken on maintenance contracts on system where the installer powered the control panel by running a cord out of the control panel into a gfci plug. That set up is not to manufacture instruction. The reason is that when the gfci trips, it kills all power to the system including the alarm system. Homeowners do not discover there system is without power and nonfunctioning until the toilets do not flush or someone is taking a shower upstairs and are causing the toilets to overflow onto their expensive wood floors down stairs. It happens. And without a doubt, at that time they will follow their maintenance providers recommendation to eliminate the gfci and hard wire their system.

    I say all this just to give an idea of what you should actually have controlling your system. Sounds like maybe someone has altered your system. Incorrectly. Or maybe it was an unpermitted thus illegal installation. It happens. In Texas usually the permitting and constuction inspections are done through a State representative at the County level. Or maybe through a regional office. That would be the contact to find a licensed repairman. Which is required in Texas. I would spend the money to get your system setup correctly. If you were to sell this property, the home inspector is going to point out the deficiencies of the system and you could likely lose the sell. It happens.

    So. If you get your system set up correctly and with the correct submersible system, then the problem you inquired about will no longer be an issue.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •