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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    1,078

    Default When a junction box just won't do...

    Neighbor came by while I was doing my outside inspection. He wanted to disclose/warn me that he had helped the nice seller by installing some exterior motion sensor lights for her a few years ago. The only thing he could find to put the relay switch in was not an approved junction box.

    He also mentioned the sellers late husband (dead 20 years) had used the hot leg of the 240 range circuit to supply some stuff in the basement. Oh, and did I happen to notice the light fixture with a fuse to run the dryer? Well you know the panel was full and that seemed like a viable method to power the dryer and provide fused protection.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Chico,Ca
    Posts
    423

    Default Re: When a junction box just won't do...

    Some folks are too clever for their own good. 'Nuff said.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    conyers, ga
    Posts
    75

    Default Re: When a junction box just won't do...

    Second fuse in a light socket, must be more common than thought.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: When a junction box just won't do...

    I would write it up for insufficient gutter space in a tackle box.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    New Westminster BC
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: When a junction box just won't do...

    Quote Originally Posted by bob smit View Post
    I would write it up for insufficient gutter space in a tackle box.
    Could have been worse - at least the person who did it recognized that the device and connections should be in a box, and that cable clamps are needed.

    Seriously though, boxes similar to this can be handy for joints and switches in circuits operating at voltages not considered “Risk of Electric Shock”, with currents that do not create any “Risk of Fire” under normal operating conditions, i.e. power limited, sub-30 volt CSA class 2 or equiv.


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