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Thread: Stove wiring

  1. #1
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    Default Stove wiring

    Need to know what size wire is needed to make run to a stove? What size breaker needs to be used?
    Thanks

    2018 ASHI InspectionWorld

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Its A stove with 4 eyes and Oven top element and bottom Its has 3 wires in its plug....


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    The first question is to determine what kind of stove is it.

    Rosa,
    Is the stove Gas or Electric ??


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    120/240 volts It state that 3 small eyes pull 1500 watts the large eye pull 2600 watts, the bake element pulls 2584 and the boil 3410 so if everything is on at same time, if my math is right it would pull 42.0624 amps so this would tell me I need a 50 amp breaker with # 6 wire ???????


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    The data plate on the appliance will tell you what ampacity you need.
    Once you know this data, you can determine the wire/conductor/breaker size.

    Perhaps you should call an electrician, it's safer.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Dom,
    Not in this case It give you only what I posted early watts and the Volts. Thanks


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom D'Agostino View Post
    The data plate on the appliance will tell you what ampacity you need.
    Once you know this data, you can determine the wire/conductor/breaker size.

    Perhaps you should call an electrician, it's safer.
    There one issue with the last statement. I have had many certified electrician do work for me. I don't have the book smart nor do I claim to be smart on things like omhs law etc etc. but I found out that if you ask all right question and get all information you need do something correct and yes be safe about it. You can in most cases do just as good as electrician, most time even better. This being said yes safety and house fires are #1 concern to prevent but that also being said when you call a electrician and you post picture of what was done guess what happen. Especially here on this site inspectors have major safety issues with way a certified electrician has done the work. So it so much better to do something correct for less Money especially these day instead of paying big big $$$$ then you in up doing it over yourself. I may be not the typical case but this is my experience this is been my issues. I aggre if you have no common sense or mechanical ability call a certified electrician do not kill yourself that for sure but I do understand your concern and thanks for that.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Rose,
    Have to ask. You do not have a Manufacture and Model number for this appliance? Where did you get this range from?


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    Rose,
    Have to ask. You do not have a Manufacture and Model number for this appliance? Where did you get this range from?
    yeah its GE got it at Lowe's and here is the model # J BP22B K1MH


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    yeah its GE got it at Lowe's and here is the model # J BP22B K1MH
    Not sure how well pic will be once down size it but here is the only tag on the GE REfig

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    Not sure how well pic will be once down size it but here is the only tag on the GE REfig
    That tag shows how much power is being used by the appliance. An electric resistance stove has a power factor of 1 so 1 kW = 1 kVA. (induction cooktops typically have a much lower power factor)

    The refrigerator is indicting that it uses 11.7kW. A refrigerator has a power factor of about .85 (depending on the age/model) which would indicate a 13.8 kVA load.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    I would vote for 40 amp with 8 gauge. Just like breaker panels, they are rated such that every element won't be on at that same time.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    According to GE's manual for JBP22BKWH, http://products.geappliances.com/Mar...e=49-88034.pdf,
    the stove requires a "A range cord rated at 40 amps with 125/250 minimum volt range..."


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Even the professionals can make mistakes. My wife's uncle retired from a 35+ year career as an electrician, and within a month he was dead--electrocuted himself on the front porch of their cottage while trying to wire a new washing machine circuit (with the juice not turned off).


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    There one issue with the last statement. I have had many certified electrician do work for me. I don't have the book smart nor do I claim to be smart on things like omhs law etc etc. but I found out that if you ask all right question and get all information you need do something correct and yes be safe about it. You can in most cases do just as good as electrician, most time even better. This being said yes safety and house fires are #1 concern to prevent but that also being said when you call a electrician and you post picture of what was done guess what happen. Especially here on this site inspectors have major safety issues with way a certified electrician has done the work. So it so much better to do something correct for less Money especially these day instead of paying big big $$$$ then you in up doing it over yourself. I may be not the typical case but this is my experience this is been my issues. I aggre if you have no common sense or mechanical ability call a certified electrician do not kill yourself that for sure but I do understand your concern and thanks for that.
    WRONG! Quit being a cheep mule! No, you cannot do what takes an electrician 4yrs experience (jouneyman) and an additional 2yrs (master) can know/do. As an Licensed Master (not "certified" as stated) and as an AHJ: I am soooo tired of this mindset and sooo tired of going to these fire inspections just because a homeowner 'thought' they could 'do electrical'!! And, it is usually the poor saps who buy the structure later on that have to pay for the cheep mules.
    I once arrived at an electrical fire job (by homeowner) where the only clean spots in the bedroom was the sheets where the outline of children WERE sleeping. Everything else was black with smoke soot.

    I would strongly suggest that this site be used as stated and not a forum for amateurs to learn how to "do electrical"!!!!!!!!


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Really some people want call people names but they don't understand when your charged for a job you can't afford it what does one do???? Yeah calling names is so not call for(CHEAP MULE) Really maybe it that its a greedy Mule more than cheap mule. If you get one light switch change out it cost 95.00 dollars hmmmmmm yeah it sounds like greed to me. maybe 15 min lol......plus if you need take you own advice about this site into of worrying about Cheap maybe you drop you prices we mite not be doing this at all............. I will make sure that if my house catches on fire your be first to know plus FYI just making sure you understand I have been inspected by city and you no what said one best jobs he ever seen just saying....... Plus you may have been in house were fire was.....so your assume that it had to be a cheap mule Really but this is enough of this its your just need to get fact correct and not call people seeking knowledge as Dumb......(cheap mules) or any other name just because you feeling threaten PLEASE !!!!!!!!!!

    Last edited by Rose Hallman; 06-03-2014 at 07:53 PM. Reason: Need to add information

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Did it hurt very much, Bob? Getting reamed a new one, that is. Or is it a knew one?


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    Need to know what size wire is needed to make run to a stove? What size breaker needs to be used?
    Thanks

    Rose,
    Always determine by the maximum rated appliance that could go there, not the one being installed. Be sure to take the length of run into consideration with the gage wire needed. In my brothers house that required us to go up one standard gage for the run. THis is true for water heater circuits etc…always the highest standard rated appliance sizing.

    I would install 50 amp, period. It is so much cheaper to do today than to change wire and breaker later. Still meets code to install a larger breaker and wire than needed. ut Yes, maybe $50-100 more today..but many times that later.

    my .02c


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirk Jeanis View Post
    I would install 50 amp, period. It is so much cheaper to do today than to change wire and breaker later. Still meets code to install a larger breaker and wire than needed. ut Yes, maybe $50-100 more today..but many times that later.
    my .02c
    That's partially true...

    The breaker needs to be sized to protect the wire and must also follow the manufacturer's installation instructions. If the appliance manufacturer specifies a 40A breaker, then a 50A breaker will not do.

    As for the wire size, it is generally acceptable to upsize the wire provided the terminals at the breaker, bus bars, and appliance receptacle are listed to accept that wire size.


  20. #20
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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by bob smit View Post
    WRONG! Quit being a cheep mule! No, you cannot do what takes an electrician 4yrs experience (jouneyman) and an additional 2yrs (master) can know/do. As an Licensed Master (not "certified" as stated) and as an AHJ: I am soooo tired of this mindset and sooo tired of going to these fire inspections just because a homeowner 'thought' they could 'do electrical'!! And, it is usually the poor saps who buy the structure later on that have to pay for the cheep mules.
    I once arrived at an electrical fire job (by homeowner) where the only clean spots in the bedroom was the sheets where the outline of children WERE sleeping. Everything else was black with smoke soot.

    I would strongly suggest that this site be used as stated and not a forum for amateurs to learn how to "do electrical"!!!!!!!!

    I agree that this is not the form to learn, there are MANY online forums for electrical education.
    However, you are 200% wrong that one wihtout your years can not properly do a job and do it in an excellent manner. IT is a matter of educatingones self.

    I was working as a commmercial electrician in CA. The contractor I worked for asked me to make some runs….but there was 20 years of spaghetti above the drop ceiings in the shop area. We were installing everything new in the entire palnt including 5 chillers…new mains..everything.

    I tore out all the spaghetti and got pull boxes from the shed. I installed a grid of pull boxes in line to the areas we needed to run…all in a VERY short time. We only had to conduit to the boxes and from there everything was EASY.

    This was my first week. My boss gave me a raise and told me that what I did was brilliant and he was surprised he didnt think of it. He told me I saved him thousands and was not even upset that 3 new runs were torn out with the spaghetti. It was more than worth it…and it solved a couple other problems for him later. We also left full round houses at every pull box, labelled and ready to go but not hooked up. The change orders went very smoothly.
    BTW the entire plant and or any equipement or light sircuit could be turned on or off by computer remotely when we finished. PGE paid a huge protion for the efficeincy and sensor circuitry to save power.

    So, just because one does not have your pedigree does not mean they can't be as good or learn what you know. I agree that the average person probably shouldn't but trained workmen can do just about any job if they know how to learn.

    THanks


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Corn Walker View Post
    That's partially true...

    The breaker needs to be sized to protect the wire and must also follow the manufacturer's installation instructions. If the appliance manufacturer specifies a 40A breaker, then a 50A breaker will not do.

    As for the wire size, it is generally acceptable to upsize the wire provided the terminals at the breaker, bus bars, and appliance receptacle are listed to accept that wire size.

    My bad you are right the breaker would need to be sized accordingly. Upsizing of wire is never an issue that I know of. Most breakers will allow clamping of one to two gages up to allow for length of run. Not usually any issue. MY point was that upgaging wire is cheap insurance against the future in this case.

    Also note that someone even stated that this device 9stove) is not rated to have all circuits running simultaneously….and I have found that to be an issude with my own stove. The elements all give less ehat than indicated when multiples circuits in the stove are on. Really pisses me off at times as I love to cook.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Corn Walker View Post
    The breaker needs to be sized to protect the wire and must also follow the manufacturer's installation instructions. If the appliance manufacturer specifies a 40A breaker, then a 50A breaker will not do.
    Very few appliances specify a breaker size (ranges, refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, water heaters, etc.), minimum or maximum. Those appliances which do specify things like that, typically specify a minimum circuit size, some will also specify a maximum breaker size (such as air conditioning condenser units), with very few of those also specifying a minimum breaker size.

    The breaker is there to protect the circuit conductors, the appliance is simply connected to the circuit. Air conditioning condenser units specify a minimum circuit size and a maximum breaker size (which is "oversize" for the minimum circuit size) to compensate for motor/compressor start up current.

    Typically, I doubt that any range/oven/cooktop will specify a maximum breaker size, that will be sized for the circuit conductor size.

    The NEC states: (underlining and bold are mine)
    - ARTICLE 422 Appliances
    - - 422.10 Branch-Circuit Rating.
    - - - (A) Individual Circuits. The rating of an individual branch circuit shall not be less than the marked rating of the appliance or the marked rating of an appliance having combined loads as provided in 422.62.
    - - - - The rating of an individual branch circuit for motor-operated appliances not having a marked rating shall be in accordance with Part II of Article 430.
    - - - - The branch-circuit rating for an appliance that is a continuous load, other than a motor-operated appliance, shall not be less than 125 percent of the marked rating, or not less than 100 percent of the marked rating if the branch-circuit device and its assembly are listed for continuous loading at 100 percent of its rating.
    - - - - Branch circuits and branch-circuit conductors for household ranges and cooking appliances shall be permitted to be in accordance with Table 220.55 and shall be sized in accordance with 210.19(A)(3).
    - - - (B) Circuits Supplying Two or More Loads. For branch circuits supplying appliance and other loads, the rating shall be determined in accordance with 210.23.
    - - 422.11 Overcurrent Protection.
    - - - Appliances shall be protected against overcurrent in accordance with 422.11(A) through (G) and 422.10.
    - - - (A) Branch-Circuit Overcurrent Protection. Branch circuits shall be protected in accordance with 240.4.
    - - - - If a protective device rating is marked on an appliance, the branch-circuit overcurrent device rating shall not exceed the protective device rating marked on the appliance.
    - - - (B) Household-Type Appliances with Surface Heating Elements. Household-type appliances with surface heating elements having a maximum demand of more than 60 amperes calculated in accordance with Table 220.55 shall have their power supply subdivided into two or more circuits, each of which shall be provided with overcurrent protection rated at not over 50 amperes.

    (Table 220.55 is to much to post here.)
    From Table 220.55 Demand Factors and Loads for Household Electric Ranges, Wall-Mounted Ovens, Counter-Mounted Cooking Units, and Other Household Cooking Appliances over 1¾ kW Rating (Column C to be used in all cases except as otherwise permitted in Note 3.):
    Column C
    Maximum Demand (kW)
    (See Notes) (Not over 12 kW Rating)

    {note 3 is not applicable as the range is rated over 8-3/4 kW:
    - 3. Over 1¾ kW through 8¾ kW. In lieu of the method provided in Column C, it shall be permissible to add the nameplate ratings of all household cooking appliances rated more than 1¾ kW but not more than 8¾ kW and multiply the sum by the demand factors specified in Column A or Column B for the given number of appliances. Where the rating of cooking appliances falls under both Column A and Column B, the demand factors for each column shall be applied to the appliances for that column, and the results added together.}

    Note 4 is applicable:
    - 4. Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with Table 220.55. The branch-circuit load for one wall-mounted oven or one counter-mounted cooking unit shall be the nameplate rating of the appliance. The branch-circuit load for a counter-mounted cooking unit and not more than two wall-mounted ovens, all supplied from a single branch circuit and located in the same room, shall be calculated by adding the nameplate rating of the individual appliances and treating this total as equivalent to one range.

    The appliance in question should be on, at least I would put it on, a 50 amp circuit.

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Let's not worry about the amount of training, materials, knowledge, truck and fuel cost, insurance, salary and overhead, taxes, and benifits needed to be covered in a 15 minute job. Ignore the fact that getting 4 billable hours out of an 8 hour day while paying someone for 8 hours is optimistic. Do not equate the billing rate against your salary. Your employer does not just bill for your salary rate.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Very few appliances specify a breaker size (ranges, refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, water heaters, etc.), minimum or maximum. Those appliances which do specify things like that, typically specify a minimum circuit size, some will also specify a maximum breaker size (such as air conditioning condenser units), with very few of those also specifying a minimum breaker size.
    That's true, although I have also seen it specified in the installation instructions for induction cooktops and ranges. Typically the language is "Required breaker size: 40A" which I've taken to specify both maximum and minimum. How would you interpret that language? As minimum only?


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Corn Walker View Post
    Typically the language is "Required breaker size: 40A" which I've taken to specify both maximum and minimum. How would you interpret that language? As minimum only?
    Depends on what else it says, but it is *only* says "Required breaker size: 40 Amp" and gives no other indication on the label about minimums, minimum circuit rating, maximum circuit rating, then I would likely make a call to the manufacturer to find out if that was minimum, maximum, or the only size permitted (but that is me, of course, you did ask how I would do it), otherwise I would read that a "minimum" because the "required" breaker size is 40 amps, and a 50 amp circuit with a 50 amp breaker meets that required size - which is why *I* would make the call to the manufacturer. I don't recall having seen any labeled that way. another reason it is worth the call.

    The breaker sizes are, after all, sized to protect the conductors, not the appliances.

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    In a condo building the two units I inspected out of the 40 possible had 50 amp breakers on #8 wiring for the kitchen range. I said have an electrician install 40 amp breakers. I advised them to inform the Strata association as well.

    Why were 50 amp breakers installed by the professional to begin with? Is that what came with the box? Am I missing something?

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by BridgeMan View Post
    Did it hurt very much, Bob? Getting reamed a new one, that is. Or is it a knew one?
    Yeah, that's not even remotely the case here buddy.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    If you get one light switch change out it cost 95.00 dollars hmmmmmm yeah it sounds like greed to me.
    Get over yourself.
    Do you have ANY idea what it takes to be a legitimate business?? Or are you one of thise ignorant people who think contractors take your $95 check and runs to the bank and cash it and then go to the bar??
    Do you have ANY idea just how much of that $95 goes into the pocket of a legitimate contractor? Maybe you should hire real contractors instead of handymen who tell you to make the check out to "cash".

    Sorry folks for the rant, but it goes BOTH ways!!



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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    To (reluctantly) answer the question, any household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be served by a 40A circuit, with a 50A receptacle and cord.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    To (reluctantly) answer the question, any household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be served by a 40A circuit, with a 50A receptacle and cord.
    That's the minimum requirement, nothing prohibits the circuit from being 50 amps (with a 50 amp cord, of course).

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    That's the minimum requirement, nothing prohibits the circuit from being 50 amps (with a 50 amp cord, of course).
    I did not imply that it couldn't. What's your point?

    And why does everyone always make the "minimum requirement" comment? If some people knew how conservative the NEC was in many respects they'd see how the minimum requirements are quite often perfectly acceptable.
    It all depends on the job. If the job has the financial resources to exceed code across the board that's what is done. Doing a job to code minimum does not automatically mean cheap or greedy contractor. To the contrary, it usually mean cheap customer.


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    I did not imply that it couldn't. What's your point?
    My point is this previous post:
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The appliance in question should be on, at least I would put it on, a 50 amp circuit.
    And why does everyone always make the "minimum requirement" comment? If some people knew how conservative the NEC was in many respects they'd see how the minimum requirements are quite often perfectly acceptable.
    Because the NEC itself disagrees with you.
    From the NEC: (underlining and bold are mine)
    - 90.1 Purpose. - (B) Adequacy. This Code contains provisions that are considered necessary for safety. Compliance therewith and proper maintenance results in an installation that is essentially free from hazard but not necessarily efficient, convenient, or adequate for good service or future expansion of electrical use.

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    So then you tell me exactly how the range in question would be:
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    not necessarily efficient, convenient, or adequate for good service
    There are probably millions in use every day like this. Why is this one different???


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    So then you tell me exactly how the range in question would be:

    There are probably millions in use every day like this. Why is this one different???
    Your statement of how good the NEC is was being applied generally and overall.

    My reply was also about what the NEC says about itself as applied generally and overall.

    Think about it before you ask specifically about that one appliance and how it can be used versus the general NEC allowance for general assumptions of use

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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Your statement of how good the NEC is was being applied generally and overall.

    My reply was also about what the NEC says about itself as applied generally and overall.

    Think about it before you ask specifically about that one appliance and how it can be used versus the general NEC allowance for general assumptions of use
    I like how you sidestepped my question and posted a cryptic reply.

    How is this one installation unsafe, or inefficient?


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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    I like how you sidestepped my question and posted a cryptic reply.

    How is this one installation unsafe, or inefficient?
    I didn't side step your question, I did suggest you think about asking about this one specific appliance.

    I can only presume you did not.

    The NEC addresses typical installations and typical use, while this one specific appliance could be used with everything on and for very long periods of time.

    You asked about this appliance on a 40 amp circuit with 50 amp cord and plug set.

    Under full use for long periods of time the 40 amp breaker*will trip ... be reset and trip again ... etc ... etc ... etc...

    It is not inconceivable that the owner will check and find the 50 amp cord and plug, the nameplate ratings, and find the 40 amp breaker, conclude that the problem is the 40 amp breaker (after all, it is the 40 amp breaker which is tripping).

    With everything else (from their perspective) being 50 amp rated and the nameplate stating that much is being used with everything on, someone accidentally installed a 40 amp breaker instead of the necessary 50 amp breaker.

    They correct the breaker tripping problem by replacing the 40 amp breaker with a 50 amp breaker.

    However, your stated 40 amp circuit only has 50 amp rated wire. (You didn't say otherwise, only that the circuit was 40 amp.)

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    I didn't side step your question, I did suggest you think about asking about this one specific appliance.

    I can only presume you did not.

    The NEC addresses typical installations and typical use, while this one specific appliance could be used with everything on and for very long periods of time.

    You asked about this appliance on a 40 amp circuit with 50 amp cord and plug set.

    Under full use for long periods of time the 40 amp breaker*will trip ... be reset and trip again ... etc ... etc ... etc...

    It is not inconceivable that the owner will check and find the 50 amp cord and plug, the nameplate ratings, and find the 40 amp breaker, conclude that the problem is the 40 amp breaker (after all, it is the 40 amp breaker which is tripping).

    With everything else (from their perspective) being 50 amp rated and the nameplate stating that much is being used with everything on, someone accidentally installed a 40 amp breaker instead of the necessary 50 amp breaker.

    They correct the breaker tripping problem by replacing the 40 amp breaker with a 50 amp breaker.

    However, your stated 40 amp circuit only has 50 amp rated wire. (You didn't say otherwise, only that the circuit was 40 amp.)
    Oh PUH-LEASE Jerry. You are REALLY grasping at straws here.
    The same could be said for everything in a home. Do people replace tripping 15A breakers or fuses with 20s or even 30s? Sure. Should we wire every circuit in a home with #10 just in case? Absolutely NOT.

    The FACT remains that it is code legal, and ABSOLUTELY TYPICAL that a houshold range, rated at 12kW or less, CAN and very often is, connected to a 40A branch circuit, with a 50A receptacle and cord.
    Would you like the NEC sections that pertain to this?


  37. #37
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,250

    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    So then you tell me exactly how the range in question would be:
    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    Oh PUH-LEASE Jerry. You are REALLY grasping at straws here.
    The same could be said for everything in a home. Do people replace tripping 15A breakers or fuses with 20s or even 30s? Sure. Should we wire every circuit in a home with #10 just in case? Absolutely NOT.

    The FACT remains that it is code legal, and ABSOLUTELY TYPICAL that a houshold range, rated at 12kW or less, CAN and very often is, connected to a 40A branch circuit, with a 50A receptacle and cord.
    Would you like the NEC sections that pertain to this?
    PUH-LEASE ... YOU ARE THE ONE WHO SPECIFIED THAT SPECIFIC appliance - and when I showed you why I suggested you think about it before asking about it ... you are trying to change it from that specific appliance to millions of appliances and now you are trying to change it to 'it meets code' ...

    YOU really need to stick with what you asked and not chide me for answering what you asked.

    PUH-LEASE ... I gave you fair warning on where I thought you would go with this ... and sure enough you did - stick with what you asked or rephrase your question - in which case I get to answer your revised question.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  38. #38
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    May 2014
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    alabama
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    23

    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    Yeah, that's not even remotely the case here buddy.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Get over yourself.
    Do you have ANY idea what it takes to be a legitimate business?? Or are you one of thise ignorant people who think contractors take your $95 check and runs to the bank and cash it and then go to the bar??
    Do you have ANY idea just how much of that $95 goes into the pocket of a legitimate contractor? Maybe you should hire real contractors instead of handymen who tell you to make the check out to "cash".

    Sorry folks for the rant, but it goes BOTH ways!!
    think maybe before you go off and rant you just don't pick out one section that someone has written go with it.....Just one more thing am not the one who is threaten so maybe you need get over yourself about poor pitiful me crap and the so call business issure you are raving about if your on the up and up you have nothing to worry about Thanks but you still haven't help with the issue.


  39. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    440

    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    PUH-LEASE ... YOU ARE THE ONE WHO SPECIFIED THAT SPECIFIC appliance - and when I showed you why I suggested you think about it before asking about it ... you are trying to change it from that specific appliance to millions of appliances and now you are trying to change it to 'it meets code' ...

    YOU really need to stick with what you asked and not chide me for answering what you asked.

    PUH-LEASE ... I gave you fair warning on where I thought you would go with this ... and sure enough you did - stick with what you asked or rephrase your question - in which case I get to answer your revised question.
    WTF are you talking about???
    I never changed anything. I've been talking about the same thing the whole time.
    Put the Sunday afternoon Mojito down son. It's clouding your vision.

    Can anyone else see wtf Jerry is going on about?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    think maybe before you go off and rant you just don't pick out one section that someone has written go with it.....Just one more thing am not the one who is threaten so maybe you need get over yourself about poor pitiful me crap and the so call business issure you are raving about if your on the up and up you have nothing to worry about Thanks but you still haven't help with the issue.
    I never once felt threatened, nor did I cry any kind of woe-is-me. I'm not sure where you are getting this from. I merely tried to explain that the prices you are crying about are typical (based on the comparisons I made) and are NOT "greed".

    Rarely in real life do I get put in a position where I have to explain myself pricing wise, and if I am met with an attitude like yours typically I'd politely say "Thanks, but I'd rather not work for you", and walk away.


  40. #40
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    alabama
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    23

    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    WTF are you talking about???
    I never changed anything. I've been talking about the same thing the whole time.
    Put the Sunday afternoon Mojito down son. It's clouding your vision.

    Can anyone else see wtf Jerry is going on about?

    - - - Updated - - -

    I never once felt threatened, nor did I cry any kind of woe-is-me. I'm not sure where you are getting this from. I merely tried to explain that the prices you are crying about are typical (based on the comparisons I made) and are NOT "greed".

    Rarely in real life do I get put in a position where I have to explain myself pricing wise, and if I am met with an attitude like yours typically I'd politely say "Thanks, but I'd rather not work for you", and walk away.
    I was never referring to you it was speedy peter or whoever was having issue I only wanted to know how to wire up my stove now the correct way ....we have got off on some trip calling names etc etc Sorry Jerry


  41. #41
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    May 2014
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    alabama
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    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    I was never referring to you it was speedy peter or whoever was having issue I only wanted to know how to wire up my stove now the correct way ....we have got off on some trip calling names etc etc Sorry Jerry
    Here is my finally take on all this, if your in business as electrician am very glad you are if your a good one thank god for that...but just need to say that not case as it not case in other fields of business. All I wanted is someone to give information on the correct way to wire of a STOVE...then some on here just went off on other calling people cheap mule etc etc. No one in there right mind will let someone else call them names. Anyway the subject is not on being electrician its how wire stove thanks. Since Ben Franklin discovered it with the key on kite we all no it will kill you DEAD. To everyone it is bad to mess with it everyone is to be safe as they can make sure you have good knowledge of it before attempting it...If you don't have knowledge call a ELECTRICIAN Thanks


  42. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    Here is my finally take on all this, if your in business as electrician am very glad you are if your a good one thank god for that...but just need to say that not case as it not case in other fields of business. All I wanted is someone to give information on the correct way to wire of a STOVE...then some on here just went off on other calling people cheap mule etc etc. No one in there right mind will let someone else call them names. Anyway the subject is not on being electrician its how wire stove thanks. Since Ben Franklin discovered it with the key on kite we all no it will kill you DEAD. To everyone it is bad to mess with it everyone is to be safe as they can make sure you have good knowledge of it before attempting it...If you don't have knowledge call a ELECTRICIAN Thanks
    Be a big girl Rose, and just let it go!


  43. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    48

    Default Re: Stove wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Hallman View Post
    Here is my finally take on all this, if your in business as electrician am very glad you are if your a good one thank god for that...but just need to say that not case as it not case in other fields of business. All I wanted is someone to give information on the correct way to wire of a STOVE...then some on here just went off on other calling people cheap mule etc etc. No one in there right mind will let someone else call them names. Anyway the subject is not on being electrician its how wire stove thanks. Since Ben Franklin discovered it with the key on kite we all no it will kill you DEAD. To everyone it is bad to mess with it everyone is to be safe as they can make sure you have good knowledge of it before attempting it...If you don't have knowledge call a ELECTRICIAN Thanks
    I agree with you Rose. As most things it didn't have to turn personal. As a PE/GC for 30 years I have seen homeowners work in all trades from pieces of art to total nonsense. Unfortunately, the latter is much more common. I commend you for reaching out to get the appropriate info from a reasonable source, although that's not really what this forum is for.Ultimately you are responsible.
    If the manufactures states 40 amp required, that's what you provide. If you want to up size the wire to provide for an appliance with a higher current rating for the future that's a personal decision.


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