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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ocala Florida
    Posts
    92

    Default Copper supply bonding

    Kind of a Florida question where most homes are on slabs. I was hoping I could get a discussion going on bonding the copper or galvanized supply piping to the electrical system. On most homes; I usually find it at the water heater but on some I do not and can't find it elsewhere. If I can't locate it; I just make a note and recommend electrician confirm that the system is properly bonded. Maybe some of the experts can give some incite as other areas it may be found that may not be visible. Also; is there a simple procedure to determine if the bond is present or anything else that would pertain to this subject. Thanks

    NHIE Practice Exam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    Are you asking about bonding or the GEC connection to a metallic water line?

    If the GEC it should be within 5' of were it enters the building on newer homes. Older editions allowed the connection to be anywhere. Normally this was close to the panel to cut down on the wire run.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ocala Florida
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    Are you asking about bonding or the GEC connection to a metallic water line?

    If the GEC it should be within 5' of were it enters the building on newer homes. Older editions allowed the connection to be anywhere. Normally this was close to the panel to cut down on the wire run.
    Jim thanks; yes the GEC connection to metallic supply piping; any thoughts on how to test if you can't locate the connection or should I just continue to refer it.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    1,899

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    Not an inspector but I would not think it would be that hard to find. Are you sure the water line is metallic and in contact with the earth for ten foot or more?

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Ocala Florida
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    Not an inspector but I would not think it would be that hard to find. Are you sure the water line is metallic and in contact with the earth for ten foot or more?
    Jim, good thought, if the home has PVC from meter or well up to home and then changes to copper just above grade or just inside the home - would it be required to be bonded?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    601

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    If the pipe system in the structure is metallic it must be bonded. Small pieces of metallic pipe used for connections to fixtures would usually be exempt. I often find repairs to copper pipe systems made with non metallic pipe and these repairs need to have bonding jumpers that bridge the repair and seldom see them installed. The bonding and grounding electrode connections to pipe are required to be accessible (with exceptions not normally found in residential type installations.)

    Bonding is to keep metal pipes (and consequently attached fixtures) from becoming energized (and staying that way) because of an electrical fault.

    Various gas appliances are allowed to be the bonding connection for gas lines so you seldom find a separate bond for the gas lines, but some means needs to be present to bond them.

    Occam's eraser: The philosophical principle that even the simplest solution is bound to have something wrong with it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    I don't look in every nook and cranny of the house and plumbing to find the GEC. If it isn't obvious, I simple note that I didn't find it. Most of the time, the outlets show grounds, but of course, that doesn't mean the system has a compliant GEC.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Copper supply bonding

    A receptacle showing as grounded has absolutely nothing to due with the presence or lack of a GEC.

    All answers based on unamended National Electrical codes.

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