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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Wyoming
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    5

    Default how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    I inspected a home yesterday and found this. I am sure you guys have seen this before. Is this too many circuits (unlabeled to boot!) in one junction box?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,549

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    No. Not too many.

    They don't need to be labeled.

    There are a lot of wires bundled in thru one hole in the panel box. That one I can't be sure about.

    There might have been a fire and a lot of cables had to be repaired, or a breaker panel was moved. Sometimes there has to be a complicated repair with a lot of splices.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    579

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    I see this quite often when old panels are abandoned and made into junction boxes. They connect new feeds and pull them to the new panel, some times they replace the old panel with a junction box also. I would guess that's what you looking at. It's acceptable even though it looks like a rats nest.


  4. #4
    Leigh Goodman's Avatar
    Leigh Goodman Guest

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    Most electrical boxes are inscribed with the volume expressed in cubic inches. Electric code tells you how much volume various size wire, the grounds, devices etc. require. You can find this info as "box fill".
    Then it is a math exercise. Add up required space and compare to box marking.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    48

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    Looks like an extra large Jbox. The wires could be organized a bit better.
    Any concern about what looks like unprotected and exposed romex popping
    out of the wall and going to an external switch or outlet box?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    St. George, UT
    Posts
    217

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    In itself it looks like it is ok, but as messy as it looks it might indicate an amateur did it. Normally an electrician is a little more organized and makes them look a little more orderly. If it were me I would be looking at other areas of the electrical to see if there are questionable practices involved elsewhere.

    I did a small commercial the other day and one by one the system may have been alright, but I could tell that every time a new retail business moved in to the building, the electrical was modified. Luckily there was one breaker that was tripped and would not reset so I easily had a reason to recommend an Electrician be consulted and make that repair, but also reported that because of so many modifications over the years an electrician do a more thorough/full Inspection of the complete system and make any needed repairs.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FL, TX
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sherrie Lyle View Post
    Is this too many circuits (unlabeled to boot!) in one junction box?
    The code requires labelling of the circuits in the main and any sub-panel. This is used as a junction box so it is a "through" connection, there is nothing to "trip" here and no labelling is needed. Also, if an electrician ever changed the main circuits, say exchanging circuit 11 for 13, then jbox labels would be incorrect.

    As to how many wires one can put in a Jbox, well when I was working in commercial electrical I found it VERY hard to have enough room for the number of wires allowed by the size of the box with connectors when wire is cut to proper lengths etc. Especially true if romex with ground is used in residential. This means that there is a neutral and ground for every hot lead instead of for every two/three as in commercial. Fills a box quickly!


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Md and or PA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirk Jeanis View Post
    As to how many wires one can put in a Jbox, well when I was working in commercial electrical I found it VERY hard to have enough room for the number of wires allowed by the size of the box with connectors when wire is cut to proper lengths etc. Especially true if romex with ground is used in residential. This means that there is a neutral and ground for every hot lead instead of for every two/three as in commercial. Fills a box quickly!
    Proper planning of the circuit wiring will result in the proper size box being utilized. I worked in commercial electrical for many many years and never had an issue with box fill.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FL, TX
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: how many spliced circuits should be in one junction box?

    Quote Originally Posted by jack davenport View Post
    Proper planning of the circuit wiring will result in the proper size box being utilized. I worked in commercial electrical for many many years and never had an issue with box fill.
    we never ran out of room relative to the number of conductors allowed, it is just that a box can be pretty full even when more conductors are allowed.

    We did one VERY large job and made arrays of jboxes smaller the farther from the source…most had 1 to 4 full round houses left in the box all the way back to the main, fully labelled to circuit numbers etc. We knew that for the next year we wold be called back to install equipment and circuits regularly. Made those jobs a lot easier.


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