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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    50

    Default Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Need to give advice to former Client. They called Illuminating company and was told it is not their issue.

    How would this be corrected if required? Raise mast head above gutter?
    Does this present a safety hazard other than not meeting height requirements?

    Note: Bottom of drip loop to ground is 7.5 feet

    The prospective Buyer of the home wants a letter from a licensed Electrician that the line is safe as is, other than not meeting height requirements, or a repair would be required.

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    Last edited by chris vis; 12-10-2014 at 11:12 AM.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,243

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Disconnect the overhead service, have electrical contractor: remove the conductors; remove the weatherhead: remove the mast; cut a hole through the soffit and the roof; install new mast sufficiently long enough to penetrate through the roof to allow the drip loop to be at least 18 inches high above the roof; install a proper flashing around the new mast; install a new weatherhead; install new conductors; have power reconnected ... that is essentially the process which the electrical contractor will need to do.

    However, your report would simply state that the overhead service drop is too low and needs to be raised so that the lowest point in the overhead service drop, including the drip loop, is at least 10 feet above grade, walkway, deck, etc., below.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Disconnect the overhead service, have electrical contractor: remove the conductors; remove the weatherhead: remove the mast; cut a hole through the soffit and the roof; install new mast sufficiently long enough to penetrate through the roof to allow the drip loop to be at least 18 inches high above the roof; install a proper flashing around the new mast; install a new weatherhead; install new conductors; have power reconnected ... that is essentially the process which the electrical contractor will need to do.

    However, your report would simply state that the overhead service drop is too low and needs to be raised so that the lowest point in the overhead service drop, including the drip loop, is at least 10 feet above grade, walkway, deck, etc., below.

    Thanks Jerry, I actually am not inspecting this home, a former client bought a house to flip and during his sale this issue arose. The new buyer states he would not require a repair if an Electrician would sign off that the line was safe as installed other than the fact that it does not meet height requirements. I was not sure if an Electrician would even make such a statement, since a taller person could reach up 7.5 feet, a ladder against the home could contact etc...

    I personally just did not understand where the liability of the power company began and ended if a repair was necessary, as I always thought (a non Electrician thought) that the power company had liability up to the meter and could not understand how they allowed this in the first place when they powered the meter/home originally. The homeowner wanted to know if it was then "grandfathered" in this condition. I told him I did not think so, but was not sure.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,243

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Quote Originally Posted by chris viscomi View Post
    ... could not understand how they allowed this in the first place when they powered the meter/home originally. The homeowner wanted to know if it was then "grandfathered" in this condition. I told him I did not think so, but was not sure.
    Power companies hook things up which should not be hooked up for a variety of reasons: being asleep on the job, being asleep on the job, etc.

    Even if the power company "owns the liability" and the buyer will accept a letter stating it is "safe" - that letter could get the electricians in hot water should anything happen and would not let the power company off the hook.

    The is, I think, thinking that the letter will provide them with someone to sue when someone is shocked by it ... I doubt they are considering that letter would cover them when someone is electrocuted by it ... because that letter will not bring anyone back from the dead.

    And, being as the buyer knows about it and is taking the extra steps to get a letter ... that could be used against the buyer in court by the power company who can say that the buyer knew about the dangers and proceeded to buy and occupy the house anyway.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia, electrical only
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Power companies hook things up which should not be hooked up for a variety of reasons: being asleep on the job, being asleep on the job, etc.

    Even if the power company "owns the liability" and the buyer will accept a letter stating it is "safe" - that letter could get the electricians in hot water should anything happen and would not let the power company off the hook.

    The is, I think, thinking that the letter will provide them with someone to sue when someone is shocked by it ... I doubt they are considering that letter would cover them when someone is electrocuted by it ... because that letter will not bring anyone back from the dead.

    And, being as the buyer knows about it and is taking the extra steps to get a letter ... that could be used against the buyer in court by the power company who can say that the buyer knew about the dangers and proceeded to buy and occupy the house anyway.

    I'm with Jerry all the way.

    However, if (sorry to HAVE TO PUT IT THIS WAY) your buddy really doesn't have the scruples to do what it takes to sell it in safe condition, he could check with the power company to find out whether they are foolish enough to send him a letter saying that their records show they found the installation acceptable, and so connected power on date such-and-such; and then ask they buyer whether this letter will satisfy him.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    274

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Maybe I missed something, but get the feeling this was a new service? If so, did the owner pull permits for the flip and did an inspector (AHJ) pass the work?

    I'm sure it varies from place to place, but our local power company owns up to the mast head, although they think they own all the equipment once they put the tag on the meter... I'm thinking the power company might expect the mast to be code compliant and connect power and not question it.

    A wiring statement has to be sent to our Power Co. stating the service complies with electrical codes before any connections, or re-connections are made.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Disconnect the overhead service, have electrical contractor: remove the conductors; remove the weatherhead: remove the mast; cut a hole through the soffit and the roof; install new mast sufficiently long enough to penetrate through the roof to allow the drip loop to be at least 18 inches high above the roof; install a proper flashing around the new mast; install a new weatherhead; install new conductors; have power reconnected ... that is essentially the process which the electrical contractor will need to do. However, your report would simply state that the overhead service drop is too low and needs to be raised so that the lowest point in the overhead service drop, including the drip loop, is at least 10 feet above grade, walkway, deck, etc., below.
    I like to limit roof penetrations as much as possible and think a simpler solution would be to run the cable under the eave above the window to the left and mount a mast with weather head on the left end of the house. This is estimating the situation as I can't see the location of the power pole or its angle with the surroundings or what is the situation with the house to the right of the pictures presented. Any way if that is possible then there is no drilling cutting or flashing necessary, simplest solutions are better the majority of the time. Just my 2 cents.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,243

    Default Re: Question on Main Line/Mast head and drip loop height

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob White View Post
    I like to limit roof penetrations as much as possible and think a simpler solution would be to run the cable under the eave above the window to the left and mount a mast with weather head on the left end of the house. This is estimating the situation as I can't see the location of the power pole or its angle with the surroundings or what is the situation with the house to the right of the pictures presented. Any way if that is possible then there is no drilling cutting or flashing necessary, simplest solutions are better the majority of the time. Just my 2 cents.
    I should have recommended the best route - underground.

    Instead, I offered the easiest route.

    If the mast doesn't go vertically for a great enough distance, then support becomes a more major consideration.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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