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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    michigan
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    Default H I mistakes today

    This guy needs some electrical edumacacion:
    I went to a mortgage repair list today (VA). "service wires corroded in panel", GFCI required for
    sump pump.

    SE cable terminations were not corroded, the were fully covered in anti-oxide compound.
    Sump pump receptacle was in finished part of basement and in a finished wall.
    The receptacle below the E panel was in the unfinished area and was not called out in the report.

    My licensed contractor invoice must state each repair made for VA waiver.
    Now, do I state exactly what was repaired (there were others), and state what was incorrectly violated? Or, do I lie and state what they want to see? The seller wants me to just make them happy. Purchaser just wants this mortgage to go through also. The seller had no issue with paying the extra $ to do the others I pointed out.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    2,446

    Default Re: H I mistakes today

    Personally, I don't lie or put anything but my own observations on any report that has my name on it.

    If you have to ask if its OK to lie on a VA waiver form, maybe you shouldn't be doing that kind of work.


  3. #3
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    Feb 2008
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    Caledon, Ontario
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    5,005

    Default Re: H I mistakes today

    Code of Ethics

    Effective on June 13, 2004

    The ASHI Code of Ethics details the core guidelines of home inspection professionalism and home inspection ethics. Covering crucial issues such as conflicts of interest, good faith and public perception, these home inspection ethics are central pillars of home inspection professionalism for the entire industry.

    Integrity, honesty, and objectivity are fundamental principles embodied by this Code, which sets forth obligations of ethical conduct for the home inspection profession. The Membership of ASHI has adopted this Code to provide high ethical standards to safeguard the public and the profession.

    Inspectors shall comply with this Code, shall avoid association with any enterprise whose practices violate this Code, and shall strive to uphold, maintain, and improve the integrity, reputation, and practice of the home inspection profession.

    All inspector members of ASHI have agreed to abide by this Code of Ethics

    1. Inspectors shall avoid conflicts of interest or activities that compromise, or appear to compromise, professional independence, objectivity, or inspection integrity.

    A. Inspectors shall not inspect properties for compensation in which they have, or expect to have, a financial interest.

    B. Inspectors shall not inspect properties under contingent arrangements

    C. Inspectors shall not directly or indirectly compensate realty agents, or other parties having a financial interest in closing or settlement of real estate transactions, for the referral of inspections or for inclusion on a list of recommended inspectors, preferred providers, or similar arrangements.

    D. Inspectors shall not receive compensation for an inspection from more than one party unless agreed to by the client(s).

    E. Inspectors shall not accept compensation, directly or indirectly, for recommending contractors, services, or products to inspection clients or other parties having an interest in inspected properties.

    F. Inspectors shall not repair, replace, or upgrade, for compensation, systems or components covered by ASHI Standards of Practice, for one year after the inspection.

    2. Inspectors shall act in good faith toward each client and other interested parties.

    A. Inspectors shall perform services and express opinions based on genuine conviction and only within their areas of education, training, or experience.

    B. Inspectors shall be objective in their reporting and not knowingly understate or overstate the significance of reported conditions.

    C. Inspectors shall not disclose inspection results or client information without client approval. Inspectors, at their discretion, may disclose observed immediate safety hazards to occupants exposed to such hazards, when feasible.

    3. Inspectors shall avoid activities that may harm the public, discredit themselves, or reduce public confidence in the profession.

    A. Advertising, marketing, and promotion of inspectors' services or qualifications shall not be fraudulent, false, deceptive, or misleading.

    B. Inspectors shall report substantive and willful violations of this Code to the Society.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: H I mistakes today

    Report that it wasn't broke or wrong. To avoid a follow up phone call, you should explain the condition of the components so that the underwriter understands why it does not require repair.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,252

    Default Re: H I mistakes today

    As I recall, Bob is - or was - an AHJ inspector ... so he does things somewhat differently ... but his post here sounds like he acted as the electrical contractor????

    Shouldn't be both at the same place, and I will go with Bob not being the AHJ at this place.

    And, last but not least, Bob needs to make sure that HE is making the correct call, not one that based on what he likes to see, but what is required by the code in effect (and we do not know which code edition is in effect there). Historically, Bob has been right some of the time and not right some of the time, so ... check the code before saying something is right or wrong that someone else said or did not say, least you make the same mistake and end up with the egg you are contemplating throwing back on your face.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,549

    Default Re: H I mistakes today

    I would say something like "the electrical system was inspected, necessary repairs were made, and no further repairs are required."

    Hey, it goes both ways. I once did a home inspection on a manufactured home that had been inspected and given a seal of approval by a licensed electrician. He stated the service was 100 amps, yes the panel disconnect was 100 amp, but the main breaker at the meter was 70 amp. In the bathroom, the GFCI was installed with reversed polarity. I just did my job and reported what I saw.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    michigan
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    421

    Smile Re: H I mistakes today

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    As I recall, Bob is - or was - an AHJ inspector ... so he does things somewhat differently ... but his post here sounds like he acted as the electrical contractor????

    Shouldn't be both at the same place, and I will go with Bob not being the AHJ at this place.

    And, last but not least, Bob needs to make sure that HE is making the correct call, not one that based on what he likes to see, but what is required by the code in effect (and we do not know which code edition is in effect there). Historically, Bob has been right some of the time and not right some of the time, so ... check the code before saying something is right or wrong that someone else said or did not say, least you make the same mistake and end up with the egg you are contemplating throwing back on your face.
    You are correct sir; I am both an AHJ, but performing my master electrician & licensed contractor duties in another county.
    The statement " or should I just lie" was rhetorical in nature, or at least meant to be.

    Yes Jerry, WE are correct most of the time, and perhaps sometimes not. I can fathom that, can you??

    My thought was that this H.I. was told/taught that sump pumps should be on a GFCI protected receptacle but not informed that this would only be the case when said outlet is in an unfinished portion of a basement, which it usually is. Basically, it is not the pump that requires GFCI protection, but the location of Any receptacle where GFCI protection is required. I have not found a manufacture that specs their S.P. to be GFCI protected. If anyone has, please inform me of the manufacturer. I did however, come across a sump style grinder pump that stated so. I apologize
    that I didn't ask its manufacture's name, oops
    Apparently, the H.I. is unaware of what anti-oxhide compound is. The NM conductors/terminations were totally free of any corrosion and the Aluminum terminations were fully covered in anti-oxhide compound which I 'assume' is what he thought was corrosion?

    My purpose, for which I can see now should have been spelled out in my post, was to educate in a non-offending manner for those on this site who may have the same misconception(s).
    My post is based on the most current NEC and Mich Resd Code (MRC). There maybe be additions and/or subtractions outside of this State. Thus, any H.I.'s reading this thread should consult the codes in effect for their local (if other than Mi).


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: H I mistakes today

    Quote Originally Posted by bob smit View Post
    The statement " or should I just lie" was rhetorical in nature, or at least meant to be.
    I understood that was a rhetorical comment, but a smiley face would have clarified it.

    Yes Jerry, WE are correct most of the time, and perhaps sometimes not. I can fathom that, can you??
    Absolutely - I am wrong plenty of times, and because of that I do not intentionally try pointing out what the inspector (of any type) who was there before me did wrong (wrote up something which was not wrong or did not write up something which was wrong), but just do what I am there to do.

    As John Kogel said: "the electrical system was inspected, necessary repairs were made, and no further repairs are required."


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    421

    Thumbs up Re: H I mistakes today

    [QUOTE=Jerry Peck;258213]I understood that was a rhetorical comment, but a smiley face would have clarified it.


    Just to make sure my intention was made clear in my last post, I'll repeat:


    "My purpose, for which I can see now should have been spelled out in my post, was to educate in a non-offending manner for those on this site who may have the same misconception(s).
    My post is based on the most current NEC and Mich Resd Code (MRC). There maybe be additions and/or subtractions outside of this State. Thus, any H.I.'s reading this thread should consult the codes in effect for their local (if other than Mi)."

    I am always interested in how other professionals communicate in written form. I and other inspectors have borrowed from each other along the way. The minimum amount of correct terms and wording whilst not (hopefully) leading the reader amiss. Misinterpretation is easy to come by without the possibility to hear reflection. This issue, even on this site among us, yet we do fairly well.

    - - - Updated - - -

    [QUOTE=Jerry Peck;258213]I understood that was a rhetorical comment, but a smiley face would have clarified it.


    Just to make sure my intention was made clear in my last post, I'll repeat:


    "My purpose, for which I can see now should have been spelled out in my post, was to educate in a non-offending manner for those on this site who may have the same misconception(s).
    My post is based on the most current NEC and Mich Resd Code (MRC). There maybe be additions and/or subtractions outside of this State. Thus, any H.I.'s reading this thread should consult the codes in effect for their local (if other than Mi)."

    I am always interested in how other professionals communicate in written form. I and other inspectors have borrowed from each other along the way. The minimum amount of correct terms and wording whilst not (hopefully) leading the reader amiss. Misinterpretation is easy to come by without the possibility to hear reflection. This issue, even on this site among us, yet we do fairly well.


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