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Thread: SEC drop

  1. #1
    Jeff Eastman's Avatar
    Jeff Eastman Guest

    Default SEC drop

    Last edited by Jeff Eastman; 12-19-2007 at 01:55 PM.
    AHIT InspectIt Home Report

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,314

    Default Re: SEC drop

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    - The SECS cross over the roof overhang for 6 feet and the drip loops are 18 inches above the roof covering - - - this is okay , correct?
    As you are showing it, no, it is not correct. Only 4 feet of overhang is allowed to be crossed, with only 6 feet of conductor length (to allow for the upward angle of the conductor being longer than the horizontal roof surface). And the 4 feet is measured form the mast to the edge of the overhang - measured horizontally, not along the slope of the roof.

    - Also in the section picture, see arrow....is this called the drip loop boot cover?
    No, that is an insulated crimp connector the power company uses.

    - Does the mast need a storm collar at the base of the boot flashing?
    Nope. But if you use a rubber flashing like that for the mast, expect it to fail as the mast has pressure (the weight of the overhead service drop) pulling it toward the pole and from the wind blowing the overhead service drop around - that will cause the mast to move slightly, which tears those rubber boot seals when they get a little old and start to dry out. The best mast flashing is a pitch pan filled with pitch.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Memphis TN.
    Posts
    4,311

    Default Re: SEC drop

    Jeff,

    Attached Service Clearance Guide.

    Attached Files Attached Files
    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  4. #4
    Jesse R Reyes's Avatar
    Jesse R Reyes Guest

    Default Re: SEC drop

    I went and blow the dust off my old Utility Spec. Book. It is called a compression sleeve cover. The compression sleeve is the connector that connects the two wires when the wire is to short or repairs were made. The cover, covers the sleeve sometimes they use electrical tape and when the temp. gets hot the sleeve and the tap loosens and falls off (this is why there should be proper clearances)
    All sec. phase should have clearances with each other if they are touching or rubbing, they will create overheating like picture .92k (discoloragetion between the two splices) and in picture 67k the phase may be laying on the neutral.
    When I visially inspect a Service Drop:
    1. I look for clearances (if they are touching)
    2. Discoloragetion on the phases or neutral
    After that I: Recommend that the client notify the Utility Co. and make the proper adjustments and repairs.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,314

    Default Re: SEC drop

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    No, that is an insulated crimp connector the power company uses.
    Out of laziness (I guess) and habit, I called it a crimp connector, because they are crimped on, but, as Jesse pointed out, they are compression connectors, more precisely though, they are 'irreversible compression connectors'.

    It is a 'full compression' and not a 'point crimp', hence 'crimp' is a poor choice of terminology for them.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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