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  1. #1
    Al Roden's Avatar
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    Question Texas Electrician Rates and Rules?

    Last edited by Al Roden; 01-30-2008 at 07:40 PM. Reason: Dummy answered some of his own question
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Texas Electrician Rates and Rules?

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Roden View Post
    Can a Journeyman Electrician directly supervise the work of an apprentice?
    Yes.

    The rules that I read say that an apprentice must work under the 'supervision' of a master electrician for 8000 hours prior to becoming a Journeyman...but it does not say 'direct supervision'.
    What "rules" 'where'???

    So, I was wondering if it is legal for a Journeyman and an Apprentice to wire a house without the Master Electrician ever being on the the premises at any time?
    Heck, you don't even need a Journeyman on the job in many places - the 'worker' (I hesitate to even call them 'apprentice') can wire the entire house by himself - sure, the master electrician who qualifies the company is *responsible* for the work, but he does not have to be 'on site'.

    And is it appropriate to charge $45 per man hour for both the Journeyman and the Apprentice? It would seem to me that one is more valuable than the other.
    And you would rather pay *more* for the Journeyman?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Al Roden's Avatar
    Al Roden Guest

    Default Re: Texas Electrician Rates and Rules?

    Man, you're fast...you answered before I could delete. Thanks.

    I looked up the licensing rules on the Texas licensing website and got my answers...a journeyman can supervise an apprentice.

    It's irritating though that the electricians, who spit tobacco on my garage floors, leave spit cups around the house and trample my wood floors that are acclimating don't know more about wiring a house than they do. They're ok but I expect more from both of them.

    I was told that two (2) electricans would be wiring my house and the rate would be $45 per man hour (90 total). And that's fine with me...BUT when I watch them and later talk with them, it's clear that the Journeyman is spending too much of my $90/hour teaching the apprentice how to do the work. That's irritating too.

    So I fired them too.

    Now I have to go out and find another electrician before the word gets out on me that I'm a pain in the ass to work for.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Texas Electrician Rates and Rules?

    Al,

    Go to the 'User CP' link on the top left, then 'Edit Profile' and type in your city and state (which I know now must be Texas) - it helps everyone out with their answers.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Al Roden's Avatar
    Al Roden Guest

    Default Re: Texas Electrician Rates and Rules?

    done.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Texas Electrician Rates and Rules?

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Roden View Post
    I was told that two (2) electricians would be wiring my house and the rate would be $45 per man hour (90 total). And that's fine with me...
    That's why it is better to get a 'job price' than a 'per hour' price. You really should not be concerned 'how long it takes' but that 'it is done right'. I know some think that a 'job price' includes overhead and profit, and it does, and it should, just like your prices do, and that the overhead and profit are to great - however, their overhead and profit are also built into the 'per hour' price, and a 'per hour' price gives them an incentive to 'make more', not 'do more'. A 'job price' gives the incentive to 'get done' and that the sooner they 'get done' the more they make.

    BUT when I watch them and later talk with them, it's clear that the Journeyman is spending too much of my $90/hour teaching the apprentice how to do the work.
    That's one way apprentices learn, one big way. They may (or may not) go to classes in an apprenticeship program (I never did), they learn from more knowledgeable persons (I learned a lot from my Dad), then they keep learning on their own.

    If you stop the journeyman from teaching the apprentice, one likely response would be to let the apprentice 'do his own thing' and learn that way when it has to be re-done. I doubt you want that either.

    I am sure there are reasons for having gone with a 'per hour' price.

    So I fired them too.
    Now you are ready to start with a new electrical contractor - go with a 'job price', you may well actually end up spending less, you will not care how much time is spent doing the work or teaching, and, if the work has to be re-done, it does not cost you (on a 'pre hour' price you could well end up paying twice for the same work, just as you will end up paying another electrician to 'get up to speed and correct the other electricians work' if you hire the new electrician 'per hour'.

    Your choice, but having been a General Contractor for many years with my own small company, I *ALWAYS* wanted a 'job price', that way I knew my costs and did not have to pay more than 'X' - unless, or course, there were change orders, and there usually were because clients tend to change their minds on what they want.

    But the client paid for that, and my OH & P was in there too.

    Now I have to go out and find another electrician before the word gets out on me that I'm a pain in the ass to work for.
    I seriously recommend trying to find some way to get a 'job price' from them and forget about a 'per hour' price. It will be less money in the long run, and less to worry about - all you have to do is worry about it being done right, you already know what it will cost.

    Happy hunting.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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