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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Oregon
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    2,365

    Default Electrical quandry.....

    New house, two single receptacle outlets in the garage (type typically for a freezer). One is on a dediated 15-amp circuit and labeled in the panel as 'freezer'

    The other one is the first stop from panel on the garage GFI circuit that extends to some outdoor receptacles but is not GFI protected. In other words the power goes from the panel, to the outlet in question, then to a GFI outlet and then on to other outdoor outlets.

    I'm okay with it not being GFI protected (at least until the 08 code is adopted in my area) but it's on a shared circuit. I seem to remember the garage 'freezer' outlets are to be dedicated. Also, is it okay to have more than one?

    It's just a bit of a quirky install. Convoluting things is this is in an county that I don't often work so I'm thinking it might be a regional thing.

    Thanks for any ideas....

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
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    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    I don't think there is a limit to the dedicated circuits for equipment in a garage, in other words, you could have two freezers so long as it is in a "dedicated" location that would not be accessible for use. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong. Could it be for an alarm, fiber optic modem, etc.?
    I found the 2003 IRC section for garage receptacles E3802.2
    All receptacles in garages... shall have GFCI... Except
    1. Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
    2. A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord and plug connected.

    Last edited by Jim Luttrall; 03-03-2008 at 07:59 PM.
    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    York SC Licensed in NC and SC
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    I see golf cart outlets in the retirement village on dedicated outlets.
    Some have 2 golf cart outlets and one freezer.

    Recent GFCI instructions say to install them indoors and wire the exterior outlets downstream for longevity.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Osceola, AR
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    I have seen this, as stated in previous posts usually for a golf cart or other special purpose, air compressor or something along that line. I don't see where this is a problem, it's just a simplex receptacle here with the exterior GFCIs downstream. I did my garage in a similar fashion when I built in 2000.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    25,317

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    The circuits being "dedicated" are not a requirement.

    Only the "space" must be "dedicated space". Of course, though, that was never followed as the "dedicated space" would be there, the receptacles would not be GFCI protected, then that "dedicated space" would be used "for something else". It was all a big joke and unenforceable because the 'loop hole' was large enough to drive a tractor-trailer rig through it.

    Just calling them 'for the appliances' (freezer, refrigerator) was enough to skirt around the GFCI protection requirement.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,829

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    I think what everyone is agreeing on is that it is OK.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon
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    2,365

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    Thanks guys....


  8. #8
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    Matt:

    If I'm not mistaken shouldn't the receptacle itself be labeled?

    Aaron


  9. #9
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    Matt:

    Sorry, that was not clear. I was referring to the labelling of the simplex receptacle in the picture.

    Aaron


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    Aaron,

    If I understand you question correctly, no, that does not need to be labeled 'Freezer' or 'Refrigerator' as neither that receptacle nor its circuit is "dedicated" for that use.

    Also, other "dedicated circuits" do not need to have the receptacles labeled either.

    In the case of that receptacle in the garage for a 'freezer or refrigerator', only "the space" for the appliance is "dedicated" for that use.

    The theoretical reason it did not require GFCI protection 'back then' is that the appliance would block access to the receptacle 'for other uses'.

    Of course, though, apparently the writers of the code exception did not consider chest type freezers - which leave that receptacle exposed for 'other uses' ... 'other uses' which would require GFCI protection.

    The point is now (2008 NEC) a moot point as that now requires GFCI protection anyway.

    The reason it did not, but now does, require GFCI protection is that 'old' appliances were allowed to have up to 50 ma of leakage (ground fault) current. For the last 15-20 years or so (don't remember when the standard changed) that allowable leakage current has been reduced to 0.5 ma, or 1/10th of what a GFCI is set to trip at.

    Modern appliances which trip GFCIs do so when there is something 'not right' and thus the GFCI is not to be blamed, the appliance needs to be checked, serviced, repaired, or replaced (as needed).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  11. #11
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Electrical quandry.....

    ECJ:

    I stand (or sit) corrected.

    Aaron


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