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  1. #1
    Wendell Swedberg's Avatar
    Wendell Swedberg Guest

    Default Minimum branch ckt requirement

    ICC practice test question:

    A 1,189VA, 120-volt basement sump pump is fed from a duplex receptacle installed in the unfinished basement rafters and fed from a dedicated circuit. The minimum requirement is:

    a) one 20amp circuit
    b) one 15 amp dedicated ciruit
    c) one 20 amp dedicated circuit
    d) one 20 amp dedicated ciruit GFCI protected.

    ICC answer is "d".....

    I say the answer is "b" because of 1189va/120=9.8 amps, round up to 15 amps as well as E3802.5 exception not requiring GFCI protection....

    Thoughts?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    (bold and underlining are mine)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wendell Swedberg View Post
    ICC practice test question:

    A 1,189VA, 120-volt basement sump pump is fed from a duplex receptacle installed in the unfinished basement rafters and fed from a dedicated circuit. The minimum requirement is:

    a) one 20amp circuit
    b) one 15 amp dedicated circuit
    c) one 20 amp dedicated circuit
    d) one 20 amp dedicated circuit GFCI protected.

    ICC answer is "d".....

    I say the answer is "b" because of 1189va/120=9.8 amps, round up to 15 amps ...
    From the 2006 IRC. (underlining is mine)
    - E3602.3 Fifteen- and 20-ampere branch circuits. A 15- or 20-ampere branch circuit shall be permitted to supply lighting units, or other utilization equipment, or a combination of both. The rating of any one cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place shall not exceed 80 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than lighting fixtures, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.

    ... as well as E3802.5 exception not requiring GFCI protection....
    What exception?

    - E3802.5 Unfinished basement receptacles.All 125-volt, single- phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in unfinished basements shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. For purposes of this section, unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like (see Section E3802.11).
    - - Exceptions:
    - - - 1. Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
    - - - 2. A single receptacle or duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another, and that is cord- and plug-connected.
    - - - 3. A receptacle supplying only a permanently installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  3. #3
    Wendell Swedberg's Avatar
    Wendell Swedberg Guest

    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    Thanks, Jerry,

    I interpreted E3802.5, Exception 2 to apply.......therefore, a GFCI is not required for the sump pump...

    2. A single receptacle or duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another, and that is cord- and plug-connected.


    Although the questions stated only a sump pump was in place, the duplex receptacle implies that two applicances could be installed......

    Also, Why a 20amp circuit and not a 15 amp circuit?


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    Quote Originally Posted by Wendell Swedberg View Post
    I interpreted E3802.5, Exception 2 to apply.......therefore, a GFCI is not required for the sump pump...


    That's the exception which used to allow for no GFCI protection for the receptacle for refrigerators and freezers, but is no more in the 2008 NEC.

    The reasoning behind allowing not GFCI protection for those appliances was that those appliances would block the receptacle, making it not accessible for any other use.

    2. A single receptacle or duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another, and that is cord- and plug-connected.

    Although the questions stated only a sump pump was in place, the duplex receptacle implies that two appliances could be installed......
    If you were applying that, then with the sump plugged into one receptacle, that would leave the other receptacle available for any other use - which would then require GFCI protection anyway.

    Also, Why a 20amp circuit and not a 15 amp circuit?
    Because of the portion I underlined " The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than lighting fixtures, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating " - using a duplex receptacle with only the sump plugged in leaves the other receptacle available for any other use, thus "where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied", meaning that your "1189va/120=9.8 amps" is greater than 50% of a 15 amp breaker, thus requiring a 20 amp circuit and protection.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  5. #5
    RobertSmith's Avatar
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    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    I agree that the branch circuit rating is 20amp for the reasons that Jerry P cited.

    However, I disagree that a GFCI is required. Wendell is right that a GFCI is not required, but is wrong for his reasoning. Let's read the cited code exception again:

    A single receptacle or duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another, and that is cord- and plug-connected.

    Let's break down the code, like this:

    a) does the branch circuit have a single recpetacle or duplex receptacle?
    Yes...the question says duplex.

    b) Are two appliances located within a dedicated space?
    no...cuz the question only says sump pump...however, the code exception does not say you have to have two applicances...it says ...duplex receptacle FOR two appliances located within the dedicated space.

    c) Is a sump pump easily moved in normal use?
    I say no, although, I guess the really small ones are.

    d) Is the sump pump cord and plug?

    Yes. It is.

    So I interpret the code to say that a GFCI is not needed in this example question.

    Anyone else agree/disagree?

    Rob


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertSmith View Post
    So I interpret the code to say that a GFCI is not needed in this example question.

    Anyone else agree/disagree?
    Other than ICC and myself disagreeing?

    This is from the Commentary to the IRC.

    E3802.2 Garage and accessory building receptacles.
    All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- or 20-ampere receptacles installed in garages and grade-level portions of unfinished accessory buildings used for storage or work areas shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

    - Exceptions:
    - - 1. Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
    - - 2. A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another, and that is cord- and plug-connected.
    Commentary (underlining is mine)
    - A receptacle in an accessory building, an implement shed, or even a storage shed also requires GFCI protection. Sometimes an appliance such as a food freezer or refrigerator is located in a garage, and where such an appliance is plugged into a GFCI receptacle, nuisance tripping of the GFCI device could cause food to spoil. Therefore, it is common to have some appliances supplied by non-GFCI circuits. Where a space is dedicated for a cord- and plug-connected appliance that is "not easily moved", the receptacle in such space can be non-GFCI protected, but it must be a single receptacle. If a duplex receptacle were used, an extension cord could be plugged in to the vacant receptacle and used to supply power for hand tools, trimmers, etc. A non-GFCI protected duplex receptacle could be used in a garage in a space dedicated for two appliances that are big enough to be considered "not easily moved"; each appliance would be supplied by one of the receptacles on the yoke of the duplex receptacle. Receptacles described by the term "not readily accessible" are garage door opener receptacles. It is not likely that these receptacles would be used to supply power for hand-held tools and other cord- and plug-connected equipment.

    I know what you are thinking ... "BUT, Jerry, that *IS NOT* for "unfinished basements", well, just hold your horses there a minute.
    E3802.5 Unfinished basement receptacles.
    All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in unfinished basements shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel. For purposes of this section, unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like.
    - Exceptions:
    - - 1. Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
    - - 2. A single receptacle or duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that in normal use is not easily moved from one place to another, and that is cord- and plug-connected.
    - - 3. A receptacle supplying only a permanently installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system.

    Commentary (underlining is mine)
    - Masonry and concrete can provide a conductive path to earth. Bare concrete or masonry walls might be subject to moisture. Where a basement masonry or concrete wall has a framed stud wall in front of it, it should not be considered a damp location, because any cable installed in the wall framing would not be in contact with the bare masonry or concrete. Review the definition of "damp location" and also the allowable applications for wiring methods in Table E3701.4. There is no detailed description of what constitutes "moderate degrees of moisture" from the Chapter 34 definition of damp location.
    - The exceptions are the same as for receptacle in a garage that are not readily accessible or are dedicated for an appliance or two appliances. (Jerry's note: Go back up and read the commentary for those one or two receptacles at garages.)
    - A single receptacle (not a duplex) supplying a plug-in transformer for an alarm system is exempt since the receptacle is occupied, and nuisance tripping could disable the alarm system.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  7. #7
    Matthew Skowron's Avatar
    Matthew Skowron Guest

    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    A sump is not an appliance it is an peace of equipment(such as a pool pump is not an appliance). and IMO shall have GFCI protection water+electricty= YOUCH

    Most of thoughs pumps i have seen if you look at the Manufacture instructions it will tell you what the minimum circuit requirements are in the wiring diagrams


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Minimum branch ckt requirement

    By definition, a sump pump, as well as a pool pump, is an "appliance".

    From the NEC.
    - Appliance. Utilization equipment, generally other than industrial, that is normally built in standardized sizes or types and is installed or connected as a unit to perform one or more functions such as clothes washing, air conditioning, food mixing, deep frying, and so forth.

    From the IRC.
    - APPLIANCE. A device or apparatus that is manufactured and designed to utilize energy and for which this code provides specific requirements.

    However, it is not a appliance which fits the meaning and intent of the code for allowing the receptacle to not require GFCI protection - as explained in the commentary. The meaning and intent in the code is that the appliance is suitable large enough, and immobile enough, to block the receptacle from any other use, and a sump pump does not fit that intent.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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