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Thread: old main /fuse

  1. #1
    Jerome W. Young's Avatar
    Jerome W. Young Guest

    Default old main /fuse

    I have never seen one like this. Anyone know any background on this particular type. I am recommending an electrician look at it because i did not feel comfortable opening it.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Oregon
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    Default Re: old main /fuse

    Were you inspecting a house or a nuclear reactor? That thing is huge

    I've seen things similar but never that exact brand or configuration. I use to to be intimidated by some of the larger access panels but have learned that most come off pretty easily and are designed to do so safely.

    My curiosity usually gets the best of me and I want to see what's inside.


  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Reno, Nv. - Now St. Louis, Mo.
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    Default Re: old main /fuse

    What you see is a 'switchboard.' Not to be confused with something used by snippy women at the phone company in days of yore, both 'switchboards' and 'switchgear' are commonly found in industrial and commercial locations.

    Each of those big switches is the disconnect for some major load - a motor, air conditioning, a panel. Inside each compartment ("bucket") there are usually fuses.

    You were correct in not opening the compartments. First off, they're designed not to open with the switch in the "on" position. Secondly, there are a number of different mechanisms for turning them back 'on;' often you can't simply flip that switch. Finally, even in "off," there are large parts within that remain energized.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Chicago IL
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    Default Re: old main /fuse

    I agree with John on this, Don't open.
    I've seen equipment like this in two garages. One owned by an Engineer with all kinds of machinery in the garage. The other a utility company worker who got the stuff for free and wired the whole house in 220v heat.

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