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  1. #1
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    Default Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    At a construction progress framing inspection I reported "Electrical receptacles in the dining room and study are spaced 8 feet apart. Spacing between receptacles should be no greater than 6 feet (NEC 210.52 (a)(1))".

    Builder response to owner "6 foot spacing not required under certain conditions" and refused but did not specify the "certain conditions" he's referring to.

    I am unable to find any exceptions or other sections in NEC that would lessen the general 6 foot spacing rule. Anyone know of any?

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  2. #2
    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    Tom,

    The required minimum spacing is 6 feet from any doorway, then every 12 feet, then 6 feet from the next doorway, with any wall space greater than 24" requiring a receptacle outlet.

    I believe, based on your wording, that you think the spacing is required to be not greater than 6 feet apart.

    I suspect this is because the code says that no wall space shall be more than 6 feet from a wall receptacle outlet, but if you take a spot on a wall, that means you can go 6 feet in either directions along the wall, or, 12 feet apart ... until you get to a doorway, in which case a receptacle outlet needs to be within 6 feet of the doorway.

    The way I find works best when looking at this is to step into the room, look for a receptacle within 6 feet of each doorway, then look to see that the others are not more than 12 feet apart, while remembering that if there is a small wall space greater than 24" wide, it also requires a receptacle outlet.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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    Default Re: Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    Mr Peck

    Thank you for your response. In rereading 210.52 you are, in fact, correct.

    Tom McDonnell


  4. #4
    gene parks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    I was just wondering how does this apply to commercial high rise electrical or it doesn't? I have been researching for an hour and without finding answer or simply over looking such a simple question.THANKS charlotte nc


  5. #5
    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    Quote Originally Posted by gene parks View Post
    I was just wondering how does this apply to commercial high rise electrical or it doesn't? I have been researching for an hour and without finding answer or simply over looking such a simple question.THANKS charlotte nc

    Gene,

    "how does this apply to commercial high rise"

    It does apply and it does not ...

    *IF* the entire high-rise is "commercial" (no dwelling units) then it does not apply.

    *IF* there are dwelling units mixed in with the non-dwelling unit occupancies, then it would be applicable to the dwelling units.

    Those requirements are from: 210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets ... specifies "Dwelling Unit".

    You would need to address the occupancy based on where it falls in:
    - III. Required Outlets
    - - 210.50 General.
    - - - Receptacle outlets shall be installed as specified in 210.52 through 210.63.

    And address lighting outlets based on where that occupancy falls in:
    - - 210.70 Lighting Outlets Required.
    - - - Lighting outlets shall be installed where specified in 210.70(A), (B), and (C).
    - - - (A) Dwelling Units.
    - - - (B) Guest Rooms or Guest Suites.
    - - - (C) Other Than Dwelling Units.

    Thus the end result is: It depends on what the occupancy is.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  6. #6
    gene parks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    Than you for you help so quickly, the answer was more than clear.The only concearn would be if the first 8 floors are for strictly commercial use and the next 20 floors was leased condos, atleast that was untill the downfall of our economy and know they will hold off on the condos.Now the next question would be if the condos was a go,would the first 8 floors fall under dwelling units210.52 ...


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    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electrical Receptacle Spacing

    Quote Originally Posted by gene parks View Post
    Than you for you help so quickly, the answer was more than clear.The only concearn would be if the first 8 floors are for strictly commercial use and the next 20 floors was leased condos, atleast that was untill the downfall of our economy and know they will hold off on the condos.Now the next question would be if the condos was a go,would the first 8 floors fall under dwelling units210.52 ...

    Gene,

    You have a mixed occupancy building, and each occupancy would need to meet the requirements for that occupancy, which means the upper floors would need to meet those requirements for dwelling units while the lower floors would not.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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