Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,828

    Default Anyone know about this?

    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,217

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    Yes. This was announced at the AARST conference a couple of weeks ago in St Louis.

    Basically, WHO is acknowledging that low levels of radon pose a health risk. This does not change the current EPA Action Level of 4.0 pCi/L.

    WHO's new Action Level should be food for thought for Realtors who pooh pooh those slightly elevated radon measurements. Next time you hear an agent tell the buyer, "I wouldn't worry about a radon measurement of 5.4. It's not that much above 4." you can point out to her that WHO set their Action Level at 2.7 pCi/L.

    By the way, there is another thread on this topic.

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,828

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    Thanks Bruce!!


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    The whole "Radon Action Level" thing is a bunch of malarkey, IMO. Can the EPA or WHO tell you how many cigarettes you can smoke/day? Other than politics, why wouldn't the "Action Level" be .01 or less?


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,217

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Seidner View Post
    The whole "Radon Action Level" thing is a bunch of malarkey, IMO. Can the EPA or WHO tell you how many cigarettes you can smoke/day?
    I know I'll never convince you (and that's not what I'm trying to do) but I'll say this anyway.

    EPA does not mandate what radon levels are in homes. They recommend a maximum level via their Action Level. You can heed it or not. It's your choice to live with high levels of radon if you wish.

    As far as I know EPA does not have an "Action Level" on cigarettes. Even if they did you can smoke as many cigarettes as you wish. Knock yourself out.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Seidner View Post
    Other than politics, why wouldn't the "Action Level" be .01 or less?
    The average radon concentration in outdoor air is 0.4 pCi/L. It would make no sense to attempt to reduce radon concentrations in homes below the ambient concentration.

    EPA says no level of radon is completely safe. (In other words, there is risk at any concentration.) What level of radon are you comfortable living with? 4.0 pCi/L? 1.4 pCi/L? 14 pCi/L? 60 pCi/L? 400 pCi/L? How many cigarettes do you think a person can smoke before it starts to affect their health? 1? 10? 20? 60? 150?

    EPA established their Radon Action Level so the public has a guideline to go by. Without the Action Level no one would know how to interpret their radon test results. With the EPA Action Level at least they have a number to compare to.

    WHO now says they recommend an Action Level lower than EPA's Action Level. The reason is that WHO says a significant number of lung cancer deaths are due to radon concentrations of less than 4.0 pCi/L.

    I don't know about you but I think the less radiation my lungs are exposed to the better.

    Last edited by Bruce Breedlove; 10-13-2009 at 06:41 PM.
    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Breedlove View Post
    I know I'll never convince you (and that's not what I'm trying to do) but I'll say this anyway.

    EPA does not mandate what radon levels are in homes. They recommend a maximum level via their Action Level. You can heed it or not. It's your choice to live with high levels of radon if you wish.

    As far as I know EPA does not have an "Action Level" on cigarettes. Even if they did you can smoke as many cigarettes as you wish. Knock yourself out.




    The average radon concentration in outdoor air is 0.4 pCi/L. It would make no sense to attempt to reduce radon concentrations in homes below the ambient concentration.

    EPA says no level of radon is completely safe. (In other words, there is risk at any concentration.) What level of radon are you comfortable living with? 4.0 pCi/L? 1.4 pCi/L? 14 pCi/L? 60 pCi/L? 400 pCi/L? How many cigarettes do you think a person can smoke before it starts to affect their health? 1? 10? 20? 60? 150?

    EPA established their Radon Action Level so the public has a guideline to go by. Without the Action Level no one would know how to interpret their radon test results. With the EPA Action Level at least they have a number to compare to.

    WHO now says they recommend an Action Level lower than EPA's Action Level. The reason is that WHO says a significant number of lung cancer deaths are due to radon concentrations of less than 4.0 pCi/L.

    I don't know about you but I think the less radiation my lungs are exposed to the better.
    Bruce,

    I think you may have misunderstood me. I (currently) believe that everyone should install a radon mitigation system in there home, regardless of the level. If it is .4 pCi/L, then lower it some more. The lower the better!

    Why would it not make sense to lower it below the ambient outdoor concentration.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,217

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Seidner View Post
    Why would it not make sense to lower it below the ambient outdoor concentration.
    Do a cost/benefit analysis on that and get back to me.

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Breedlove View Post
    Do a cost/benefit analysis on that and get back to me.
    The cost part is easy. The benefit part, you can get back to me on.

    Last edited by Cary Seidner; 10-13-2009 at 10:38 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    The EPA's website at: Health Risks | Radon | US EPA , states:

    "The average radon concentration in the indoor air of America's homes is about 1.3 pCi/L. It is upon this level that EPA based its estimate of 20,000 radon-related lung cancers a year upon. It is for this simple reason that EPA recommends that Americans consider fixing their homes when the radon level is between 2 pCi/L and 4 pCi/L. "

    "Unfortunately, many Americans presume that because the action level is 4 pCi/L, a radon level of less than 4 pCi/L is "safe". This perception is altogether too common in the residential real estate market. In managing any risk, we should be concerned with the greatest risk. For most Americans, their greatest exposure to radon is in their homes; especially in rooms that are below grade (e.g., basements), rooms that are in contact with the ground and those rooms immediately above them."

    The EPA's " Home Buyer's & Seller's Guide to Radon" states

    "Radon levels less than 4 pCi/L still pose a risk and, in many cases, may be reduced."

    "Short-term tests can be used to decide whether to reduce the home's high radon levels. However, the closer the short-term testing result is to 4 pCi/L, the less certainty there is about whether the home's year-round average is above or below that level. Keep in mind that radon levels below 4 pCi/L still pose some risk and that radon levels can be reduced to 2 pCi/L or below in most homes."


    -

    Erby Crofutt, Georgetown, KY - Read my Blog here: Erby the Central Kentucky Home Inspector B4 U Close Home Inspections www.b4uclose.com www.kentuckyradon.com
    Find on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/B4UCloseInspections

  10. #10
    john_opwin's Avatar
    john_opwin Guest

    Default Re: Anyone know about this?

    I am attentive for World Health Organization. But I was not aware about Radon Action Level of 2.7 for Less Lung Cancer Risk. It is really good. Thanks for make me conscious about this.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •