Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    K Robertson's Avatar
    K Robertson Guest

    Default Black stuff on a wall.

    If you see "black stuff" on a exterior wall that appears to be constantly moist and that same "black stuff" on the adjacent interior wall, how do you report it.

    I've been told a hundred times to never use the "M" word in a report. Was talking to a retired evironmental inspector the other day and he said to report it as a "suspicious growth which should be tested by an environmental specialist to identify type and degree of damage."

    I've personally never come across this... yet. With all this rain we are getting here in North Texas, I'm sure it's going to stick it's ugly head up soon and want to be ready when it does. Comments? Suggestions?

    Similar Threads:

  2. #2
    Tim Moreira's Avatar
    Tim Moreira Guest

    Default Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    I've been told a hundred times to never use the "M" word in a report.
    K.,

    Why not? Why mince words? If you suspect it is mold then say so. Is the mold police going to come after you for stating your professional opinion in writing.

    I have no problem stating something like "at such and such an area mold or some kind of organic growth was noted blah, blah, blah... recommend having it removed..."

    "suspicious growth which should be tested by an environmental specialist to identify type and degree of damage."
    Who really cares what type it is unless the family is having medical issues and a Dr. wants to know the type. Other than that, if it is there (on the inside of the home) it needs to be abated. Period.


  3. #3
    Craig LaMere's Avatar
    Craig LaMere Guest

    Default Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    As long as you have made a notation in your report regarding it's presence, you have made all parties concerned aware of the condition. In our area, the panhandle of FL, the word "mold" sends everyone off the edge. We offer mold testing as a service to our clients, but truly only do the collection of the samples, making us "mold technicians", and send them to the lab. Since only an analysis by a qualified lab can positively identify mold, we are making an assumption as to what it actually is on site. Just like saying "those are termites" without being a licensed, certified WDO inspector.
    Try saying "there appears to be a mildew or mold-like substance present at ..." and recommend that mold testing be done. It never hurts to include items in your report, it only hurts if you leave it out.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig LaMere View Post
    and recommend that mold testing be done. It never hurts to include items in your report, it only hurts if you leave it out.
    By and large, mold testing DOES NOT NEED TO BE DONE, just as Tim stated.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Craig LaMere's Avatar
    Craig LaMere Guest

    Default Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    Just a way of wording it in the report for notations sake. Wouldn't it be more beneficial to identify the cause of the "black stuff" and correct that instead?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig LaMere View Post
    Wouldn't it be more beneficial to identify the cause of the "black stuff" and correct that instead?
    Yep, and that's what a home inspector's first response should be.

    Mold does not need to be tested, not unless a doctor is involved and is trying to find the source of an allergy problem, and that reason is RARE. Yet there are hundreds, no, make that thousands of home inspectors out there who are milking the mold-is-gold phenomenon for all it's worth and the only positive outcome is the increase in the size of the bank accounts of those inspectors (to the detriment and decrease in the size of the bank accounts of the people they were hired to help).

    And, on those RARE occasions when a doctor does need to know, they don't go to a home inspector, they go to another professional, an industrial hygienist or microbiologist.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,633

    Smile Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    I recommend you use the term "Black Paticulate Matter" or "Black Matter". This is a growing area of law and these terms are the ones being used in court. What you are saying is, the stuff is identifiable visually by color and that it appears to be loose or easily removed in the case of BPM. Not all mold can be removed hence the BM term while "soot" or most things mistaken for "soot" are loose and can be wiped off.

    You could state that based upon other evidence such as moisture or the odor, you suspect mold or WDO or whatever term you're using for mold these days and that you recommend it be followed up. You don't have to be the sole determiner of who problems get referred to. Your primary job is to point them out. The main idea to communicate is there is stuff there you suspect shouldn't be there, you think it in and of itself could represent a problem but also what lead to it getting there as you feel it is not a natural phenomenon to be expected like frost on single pane windows in winter.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
    Posts
    341

    Default Re: Black stuff on a wall.

    I conduct "visual inspections" as such, I word my document as follows:

    "a mold like substance was observed at.... location"

    I do however, depending on the severity of the problem, have private words with my client.

    mostly it would go like this:

    "most surface mold/mildew can be taken care of with bleach."

    or...
    "unfortunately, I can't tear that wall out to look behind it. But, what you see there is usually indicatve of a moisture problem that needs correcting."

    or......
    "the only one who will be able to tell you exactly what it is, is a Micro Biologist"


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •