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  1. #1
    brianmiller's Avatar
    brianmiller Guest

    Default Ramps for commericial building

    A 1950 home was converted for commericial property use.

    A ramp was installed at the front of the house. About 15 feet long, rising to a height of about 15 inches.

    1) One handrail was installed attached to the front door and window casement trim, as well as to the house siding. It's a metal handrail that runs about 15 feet with a leg support at both ends, but not supports in between.

    Questions:

    Is is appropriate to fasten the handrail to the house in this manner? I question whehter the fasteners are going into the wall framing, only the siding or casement trim.

    Should there be addition supports for the handrail?

    2) The outer guardrail is intalled in similar manner; two legs supports at the end but not other supports. Also , there are no balusters.

    Questions:

    Should there be additional leg supports and ballusters?

    thanks,

    b

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Ramps for commercial building

    The proper support for a handrail is that which will allow the handrail to support a force of 200 pounds placed against the handrail in any location and in any direction.

    Your description does not sound like it would.

    Additionally, the handrail is required to extend out past the ends of the ramps.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    brianmiller's Avatar
    brianmiller Guest

    Default Re: Ramps for commericial building

    Thanks, Jerry.

    What about balusters on the guardrail not needed since the height of the ramp at the landing is about 15inches?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,252

    Default Re: Ramps for commercial building

    Brian,

    There are a lot of requirements for ramps, including slope, width, landings and turning space, many requirements.

    This is regarding handrails for ramps.
    - 2006 IBC. (You said commercial, so it uses the IBC instead of the IRC.) (underlining and bold are mine)
    - - 1010.8 Handrails. Ramps with a rise greater than 6 inches (152 mm) shall have handrails on both sides. Handrails shall comply with Section 1012.

    - - 1012.5 Handrail extensions. Handrails shall return to a wall, guard or the walking surface or shall be continuous to the handrail of an adjacent stair flight or ramp run. At stairways where handrails are not continuous between flights, the handrails shall extend horizontally at least 12 inches (305 mm) beyond the top riser and continue to slope for the depth of one tread beyond the bottom riser. At ramps where handrails are not continuous between runs, the handrail shall extend horizontally above the landing 12 inches (305 mm) minimum beyond the top and bottom ramps.
    - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - 1. Handrails within a dwelling unit that is not required to be accessible need extend only from the top riser to the bottom riser.
    - - - - 2. Aisle handrails in Group A occupancies in accordance with Section 1025.13.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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