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  1. #1
    Jason Edwards's Avatar
    Jason Edwards Guest

    Default Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Greetings! I have attached several pics of a window on a home with a corroded lintel. Please note the cracks in masonry work on each side of the lintel.There does not appear to be any sagging. Salvagable with a steel brush, rust reformer and paint? Or not?

    Your thoughts please!

    DSC_0246.jpg

    IMG_4209.jpg

    DSC_0247.jpg

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  2. #2
    Jason Edwards's Avatar
    Jason Edwards Guest

    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    A few more pics of the lintel. I believe the flashing was not installed properly. It appears to have been painted at one point, sometime between when we dropped the bomb and the japs surrended.

    IMG_4201.jpg

    IMG_4207.jpg

    IMG_4204.jpg


  3. #3
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
    chris mcintyre Guest

    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Edwards View Post
    There does not appear to be any sagging.
    Perhaps due to the fact that there is a longer lintel one course above?

    Based on the title of the thread, is there another lintel a few courses up?

    Salvagable with a steel brush, rust reformer and paint?
    I think so.


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    No moisture barrier and cracking is caused by expansion of the corroding lintel, but how old is the building Jason?


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Is this area exposed to prevailing weather? Could be wind driven rain has entered the area.

    Also what was formerly above this window, it appears there may have been a canopy? The white caulking above the window and holes drilled on top of the window give the appearance of a canopy, along with paint lines down either side of the window? This former canopy or whatever was attached may have also assisted in the demise.


  6. #6
    Jason Edwards's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    The building is about 60 years old. It appears to have been repointed within the past several years. Good eyes Raymond. If you notice the line of sealant approx. 2-3 inches up, that is from a awning/canopy that was removed several years ago. In some of the close ups, you may notice an additional line of sealant much closer to the lintel itself. That was the sealant on the upper portion of the flashing (please see attached pic). The attached pic illustrates how the flashing was installed before I removed it (This pic is of another window next to the window in question). As you can see, it appears to be in a similiar state.

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  7. #7
    Jason Edwards's Avatar
    Jason Edwards Guest

    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Interesting point Chris. I assumed that the line of sealant was several inches up was from a awning, but could that be another lintel with weep holes (see the holes?) Interesting, why would another lintel be installed without removing the old one?


  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Who knows why or what the reason for what looks like a second lintel. It looks like an after thought, perhaps an attempt to salvage the window. It could also be from a metal awning as you said.

    The lintel at the window is blown and needs replacing, scraping and repaint would not do anything for the parts you can not see in the wall. At 60 years of age what you have found should be expected.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    The lintel at the window is blown and needs replacing, scraping and repaint would not do anything for the parts you can not see in the wall. At 60 years of age what you have found should be expected.

    I agree.

    While the bottom of the lintel looks okay, look how much the expanding rusted top surface as pushed the mortar up above the lintel.

    Time to replace it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  10. #10

    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    I don't actually see any weep holes... that could be a contributing factor, and as a continuing factor, would be a good indication of the need for replacement.

    Egbert Jager
    Diamond Home Inspection
    http://www.diamondhomeinspection.ca

  11. #11
    Jason Edwards's Avatar
    Jason Edwards Guest

    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Thanks for your comments everyone. Anyone have any idea how much this may run? I would probably do a total of three windows that all appear to be in the same condition.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    That's not flashing you removed but cheap capping over the brick mould. That's not an original window. Triple tracks came later than the post WWII building boom.Remove rotted brick mould, then assess.No on a secondary lintel. Those are not weeps those are bored holes formerly used to secure a wood brace or support for the former awning.Stress fractures at both sides, possibly due to improper mounting of overly heavy metal awnings and so close to lintel.Structural brick not same as facing brick.Costs depends, maintenance on the lintel, the repair and pointing work? R/R the rotted brick mould, or the unknown damage to replacement window unit frame, wall, etc.?


  13. #13
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
    chris mcintyre Guest

    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Edwards View Post
    Anyone have any idea how much this may run?
    It will vary from region to region but is always more than you expect.

    Just a couple of thoughts, it will be impossible to match the brick and mortar so a soldier coarse or jack arch may help hide the repair. Also the wire (in the pic, post #6) is a no no.


  14. #14
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Edwards View Post
    Thanks for your comments everyone. Anyone have any idea how much this may run? I would probably do a total of three windows that all appear to be in the same condition.
    I have heard that $1500 per window is a good ballpark figure, but it all depends on your specific area.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Lintel Lintels Lintels

    I'll explain what I'm seeing.

    Original rolled steel window unit, cut back, area filled in (note fill lumber at top), gaps fitted with brickmould, replacement window set in place, then capped with aluminum (upper piece was removed to expose brickmould fitted to opening when replacement window was installed).

    Holes (four round, not lined up with joints) were locations of former fasteners for awning. Formed/bent/ rolled galv or lead is flashing and former steel window frame.


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