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Thread: Failing Arches

  1. #1
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    Default Failing Arches

    Do any of you know of a way to repair these failing arches I see all the time, short of tearing it down and rebuilding it?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Bubble gum and hairpins?

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    That light extension cord may be just the trick.


  4. #4
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Bombardiere View Post
    Do any of you know of a way to repair these failing arches I see all the time, short of tearing it down and rebuilding it?

    No, especially with the rowlock on the bottom.

    Here is a good document on brick arches: http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t31.htm


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Thanks Chris, Looks like some good info.

    Oh and thanks to the others for their useful remarks too

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    And here I thought this was going to be about orthodics or arch supports/shoe inserts! Thought someone had to jump too far and had "fallen arches".

    This does not appear to be structural brick or structural stone work, but veneer.

    Angle iron, in this case curved, and appropriately flashed is almost always necessary at a minimum to support such openings with even hollow veneer brick.

    Answer, No. You cannot lick and stick brick, gravity, moisture, expansion, and movement will take over it is only a matter of when, not if.

    Although in exterior topic area, looks might be actually interior, judging from drop ceiling panels in background. If exterior, worse yet due to weather exposure and no drainage plane.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 09-09-2010 at 06:50 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Frank,

    Here's another head knocker waiting to happen.

    rick

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  8. #8
    Joe Cavasin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    isn't the old adage "if it doesn't move and should, use WD40, if it does move and shouldn't, use duct tape."

    Seems like a little duct tape would be just the thing for this problem...


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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    And here I thought this was going to be about orthodics or arch supports/shoe inserts! Thought someone had to jump too far and had "fallen arches".

    This does not appear to be structural brick or structural stone work, but veneer.

    Angle iron, in this case curved, and appropriately flashed is almost always necessary at a minimum to support such openings with even hollow veneer brick.

    Answer, No. You cannot lick and stick brick, gravity, moisture, expansion, and movement will take over it is only a matter of when, not if.

    Although in exterior topic area, looks might be actually interior, judging from drop ceiling panels in background. If exterior, worse yet due to weather exposure and no drainage plane.

    I just have to do it! "Dr. Scholl'sģ Adjustable Arch Pain Relief" Sorry.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Frank

    Your arch as constructed is considered non-structural and will not be self-supporting. It needs some type of continuous support like a curved steel plate. That brick is an accident waiting to happen. I would suggest removing it and replace with an arch with a continuous support.

    Randy Mayo, P.E.
    Residential Engineering & Inspection Services
    http://www.rlmengineers.com

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Randy,

    Do you happen to have any pictures of how an arch as such should be supported. This type of arch construction is typical here in the Dallas area and I can't say I've ever seen one supported with a steel plate as you mention.

    rick


  12. #12
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Rick,

    Couple of images from a nice support on a custom property I inspected in July.

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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Rick

    Here is a web site showing the proper steel support ESPINOZA STONE, INC - Texas' Leading Purveyor of Quality Natural Stone Products

    Randy Mayo, P.E.
    Residential Engineering & Inspection Services
    http://www.rlmengineers.com

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    I wrote it up to be repaired as needed by a qualified masonry contractor. I am just wondering why they do this all the time around here when about 25% of them are failing when I see them. I inspected a good friends home years ago before I was very familiar with this detail and there was a small crack in the arch. Now it is over an inch wide and he is having to have it rebuilt. Since then, I have always made issue of these arches when I see a crack developing since I now know what is likely to happen over time. I just don't get why the building depts around here and evidently where Rick is, allow them to build them this way. Like Rick, I have not ever seen one with added support.

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  15. #15
    Thomas Streicher's Avatar
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Bombardiere View Post
    I wrote it up to be repaired as needed by a qualified masonry contractor. I am just wondering why they do this all the time around here when about 25% of them are failing when I see them. I inspected a good friends home years ago before I was very familiar with this detail and there was a small crack in the arch. Now it is over an inch wide and he is having to have it rebuilt. Since then, I have always made issue of these arches when I see a crack developing since I now know what is likely to happen over time. I just don't get why the building depts around here and evidently where Rick is, allow them to build them this way. Like Rick, I have not ever seen one with added support.
    Probably a case of they donít build it like it was drawn up, and then the building inspector missed something. Happens all the time.
    Donít stand under any of that!


  16. #16
    Tom Roon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Failing Arches

    The bricks on the arch are not structural and were for aesthetics only. The were not laid at an angle to allow to carry themselves, let alone anything above, but again, they are for "looks' only. The problem seems to be that mortar is not a glue and when it shrinks, it will eventually let loose of the bricks. The mason should have glued the brick in place and tuck pointed with the tan mortar. Now, it's a problem. At least the curved portion will likely have to be removed and relaid.


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