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Thread: Angle Iron

  1. #1
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
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    Default Angle Iron

    Is some type of angle iron typically required along the arch.

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  2. #2
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    Typically it is not angle iron. Many of these are engineer designed. Some are self supporting. Some have rolled steel plate support.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    Quote Originally Posted by mathew stouffer View Post
    Is some type of angle iron typically required along the arch.
    The Romans never used angle iron.

    How old is the house? Any signs of failure? Maybe it's too soon to tell.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    That decorative stone (or faux stone) is either fully adhered, mechanically attached, or both.

    The structure is behind the cladding, and unlike brick or masonry veneer which is self supporting from the ground up, that is applied to the structure behind it.

    Typically, you will find that it is fully adhered and mechanically attached (to keep it from falling if - when - it comes loose).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    I agree, it's a veneer - you can tell by the depth of the stones. Jerry, how would the stones be mechanically attached?

    Do not think of knocking out another person's brains because he differs in opinion from you. It would be as rational to knock yourself on the head because you differ from yourself ten years ago.
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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristi Silber View Post
    I agree, it's a veneer - you can tell by the depth of the stones.
    Exactly.

    Jerry, how would the stones be mechanically attached?
    The installers drill holes through the stones and use anchor screws, Tapcons if into concrete, usually SS screws if into wood framing or metal framing. If the screws are not corrosion resistant then the screws will rust or corrode away and become useless at some point in the future, which would basically be like not anchoring the stones in place. Typically, fully adhered installation do not rely solely on the adhesive, be it mortar, thin set, or other adhesive because adhesives can - and do - fail and allow the stones to come lose and even fall. Stones falling from that arch could be deadly.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    Through the stones? Then surely they, or a filler over the hole, would be visible? I thought perhaps they would drill from the back. I imagined a steel framework, with tapcons used from the inside (or can they not be used in stone?). If the stones are snug enough under the arch (especially if they are cut at an angle), there might be enough friction to hold them in place even if they come lose. Well, just a thought - not sure I'd want to depend on it!

    Do not think of knocking out another person's brains because he differs in opinion from you. It would be as rational to knock yourself on the head because you differ from yourself ten years ago.
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    Mathew

    That arch would be considered non-structural and would not be able to support its own weight without some type if internal support framework. Here is a nice article about arches:
    The Masonry Arch: Arch Design & Consulting

    To me the question becomes how are the stones attached to the internal framework. I would have to see the design plans and stone attachment details in order to render an opinion. I would just state an arch of that size carrying an additional load, other than its own weight, would typically need to be engineered. Giving an opinion, good or bad, on this arch would be way outside the normal standards of practice and would place you in the land of unlimited liability.

    Randy Mayo, P.E.
    Residential Engineering & Inspection Services
    http://www.rlmengineers.com

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    Default Re: Angle Iron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristi Silber View Post
    Through the stones? Then surely they, or a filler over the hole, would be visible?
    The filler is visible in most cases, but sometimes you have to be close and look closely for it.

    The way to tell if they are fully adhered or not is to tap on them, the ones not fully adhered (or the ones which are loose) will have a hollow sound, while the ones which are fully adhere (and not loose) will sound solid (if on masonry, will sound less hollow if on frame).

    You can also see cracking in the mortar joints where the mortar meets the stones, as that is typically the first place to show the movement of the stones.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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