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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    57

    Smile Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    Came across this during an inspection this morning. Bank Foreclosed property, approximately 10-15 year old frame addition (because it has metal siding) in the rear of a masonry home (at this point no idea if it was done by permit). There was significant termite damage noted at the sill plates and lower studs of at least three walls up through the to the second floor windows. In addition, the slab that it was built on sloped to ground level from a point of about 3" (front to rear). Mold noted along lower portion of walls. Also, they appeared to use sheetrock on the outside of the studs where normally plywood or OSB would be? Was this a general practice back then? I know that we don't determine how this should be repaired, but for my own knowledge, Can this be repaired or should it be razed and redone. My initial thinking is with slab height being inadequate for a structure, moisture intrusion would always be a problem. As well as, the significant termite damage might make it necessary for extensive repairs.


    Thanks for any comments.

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  2. #2
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    Can this be saved? Probably... but why would anyone want to put good money after bad?

    Wood rot, poor construction, poor flashing, bad materials, mold, termites.... this thing has it all.

    There are only 5 things that can cause a problem:
    Materials, Methods, Man-power, Machinery, Management--- this one is 5 for 5! Tear-er down, say I.

    rr


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,517

    Default Re: Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    Why spend good money dressing up a turd?

    Put it out of its misery. I'm sure the neighbors won't mind a bit.


  4. #4
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    In the Army we had an old saying.... "You can't polish a turd"

    No matter how hard you rub or polish, it's still a piece of shee!!t.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    4,112

    Default Re: Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    Sean, the addition should come down.
    The "Sheetrock" is likely exterior grade gypsum sheathing. Common for use behind brick and other sidings. I think it is still used today in commercial construction.
    Jim

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  6. #6
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    I disagree with most. Everything can be repaired with pockets that are deep enough. If you like the design and everything, just replace the defective parts with new and you should be good for another 5-10 years before you have to re-do it again. Just think of the knowledge that you can pick up and make it easier the next time. You can even save money if you don't treat the WDI. That will help you re-live the experience even quicker.

    On the other hand, if you don't want to keep spending money trying to make a turd look good, tearing it down, treating for the WDI and re-building would be prudent.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Can this be saved or should it be torn down?

    Guys, thanks for the responses...


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