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Thread: Hammered!

  1. #1
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    Default Hammered!

    This one has me confused. The bolts have carriage head but do not exit the other side of the wood. Are these some type of lag bolt that is hammered in?

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    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    No such a thing as Im aware of.
    That deck has other problems, need to have a contractor look at that one.
    Jeff


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    Quote Originally Posted by Vern Heiler View Post
    The bolts have carriage head but do not exit the other side of the wood. Are these some type of lag bolt that is hammered in?
    Yes ... ... they are called "DANG! The carriage bolts are too short and the dang hardware store is 25 miles from here, WTH are we going to do ... WAIT! ... we can drill the holes and hammer the bolts in - they will hold because the load from above will wedge them in place."

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Yes ... ... they are called "DANG! The carriage bolts are too short and the dang hardware store is 25 miles from here, WTH are we going to do ... WAIT! ... we can drill the holes and hammer the bolts in - they will hold because the load from above will wedge them in place."
    "DANG" well that pretty much says it all..DANG!

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    You aren't supposed to look on the other side...

    You don't think they used a concrete anchor of some type??? Such as this:


    Bubba, if it's good enough for concrete, it's good enough for wood...


  6. #6
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    FLORIDA
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    5/16 diameter ring shank nails...hehe


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    Is that deck secured to the brick veneer?

    Darren www.aboutthehouseinspections.com
    'Whizzing & pasting & pooting through the day (Ronnie helping Kenny helping burn his poots away!) (FZ)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Miller View Post
    Is that deck secured to the brick veneer?
    Through bolts with washers go through the brick veneer and through the rim joist. There is some type of spacer between the brick and the rim joist. The bolts are in at an angle pointing up toward the rim joist so water will not follow the bolt into the wall. I know code says not to attach to brick but I see it passed so often I don't make a big deal about it anymore.

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  9. #9
    Jacob Small's Avatar
    Jacob Small Guest

    Default Re: Hammered!

    Joists actually run parallel to the wall so the rim joist isn't so much a rim joist... Hard to see due to the lack of context on the photo, but I'd say that the member in question isn't actually a beam or a joist, but more a decorative member - the post likely sits directly under the beam which runs perpendicular to the brick wall. This member you're questioning was likely a temporary piece left in place as "trim" to keep the posts square while they framed up the deck above it.

    There are several bigger issues than the bolt though as others have mentioned.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    Whatever the joists are resting on have to be supported at the house. I do not see any posts against the house so the beam & rim boards must be attached at the house.

    Darren www.aboutthehouseinspections.com
    'Whizzing & pasting & pooting through the day (Ronnie helping Kenny helping burn his poots away!) (FZ)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Chicago
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    I don't think this is confusing. It is crazy sh*t. The boards with the flat 2x4s beneath are wanna be "beams" supporting adjacent joists and the beams are supported by...um, this is a disaster.

    Since you are asking about the bolts, ... I suggest you say the this deck looks poorly framed, and a qualified carpenter should evaluate further.

    Mike Lamb
    Inspection Connection, Inc.
    http://www.inspection2020.com/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bozeman, Montana
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    91

    Default Re: Hammered!

    Dido what Mike said! The folks in my family are big. If we are going to get together on a deck, it had better have been built by someone who knew how to swing a hammer. I would not put my family on that deck. To be a bit clearer, I am not saying this deck is a throw away. It can be salvaged. From the lone picture it appears as though it is basically a floating floor that needs support. Not that difficult, or time consuming to remedy. But necessary.


  13. #13
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    Hercules, CA
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    How about non-preservative treated wood exposed to the weather....

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Hammered!

    The deck does look and feel solid, all of the joist ends are supported by either ledger boards or metal hangers or in some cases both. All of the lumber appears to be pressure treated and there is no sign of deterioration.

    And now "the rest of the story" as Paul Harvey would say. This was a pre-listing inspection, so I was working for the seller in this case. I listed everything I found in the report but was sure to let the customer know that nothing I say has to be corrected. I did tell him the bolts would probably be the most glaring issue, but in truth the bolts were providing shear strength and I am sure that with the pressures on those bolts they were not coming out easily.

    So what would you have done?

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

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