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Thread: Log Home

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
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    11

    Default Log Home

    Didn't know where to put post this. I have a log home to inspect. Was wondering what critical areas to inspect and any hidden items to look for. I know that windows and doors could be an issue do to shrinkage of the logs. Is there a link I could refer to as a guide.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    High Springs, Florida
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    102

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Lansdale, PA
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    876

    Default Re: Log Home

    Look for WDI damage. Older log homes often used wood that was not treated.

    Also, sometimes garages or additions are stick built and sided with ship lapped log siding that can fool you into thinking it is log construction. Not that that method of construction is a problem, but just something to be aware of.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Log Home

    I put this document/checklist together several years ago, it is basically an overview of a class I use to teach. It is pretty comprehensive and should help you stumble through the inspection. It will give you a little history and some terminology that you can research if you care to learn a little more... Most folks overthink log home construction, just think of it as another cladding with a few little special differences….

    The single largest problem I see is rot and lack of care from the owners. Log homes need to have their logs protected from the elements, so stains, and penetrating finishes are very important to their longevity.

    Log Home checklist.pdf

    Last edited by Scott Patterson; 07-06-2015 at 07:55 PM.
    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  5. #5

    Default Re: Log Home

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    I put this document/checklist together several years ago, it is basically an overview of a class I use to teach. It is pretty comprehensive and should help you stumble through the inspection. It will give you a little history and some terminology that you can research if you care to learn a little more... Most folks overthink log home construction, just think of it as another cladding with a few little special differences….

    The single largest problem I see is rot and lack of care from the owners. Log homes need to have their logs protected from the elements, so stains, and penetrating finishes are very important to their longevity.

    Log Home checklist.pdf
    Chinking is important (filling in all cracks between logs) sealing with waterproofing stain. balance is same as any other inspection in my opinion.

    Rolland Pruner


  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Log Home

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    I put this document/checklist together several years ago, it is basically an overview of a class I use to teach. It is pretty comprehensive and should help you stumble through the inspection. It will give you a little history and some terminology that you can research if you care to learn a little more... Most folks overthink log home construction, just think of it as another cladding with a few little special differences….

    The single largest problem I see is rot and lack of care from the owners. Log homes need to have their logs protected from the elements, so stains, and penetrating finishes are very important to their longevity.

    Log Home checklist.pdf
    Scott, I googled the topic on the internet and your thread came up. I've already saved and printed the attachment. Very helpful!! Thanks. Also been reading articles and watching webinars as well. A lot to look for on the exterior and inside as well. Thanks!!!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Lewis View Post
    Thanks Roy!!


  7. #7

    Default Re: Log Home

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Reinmiller View Post
    Look for WDI damage. Older log homes often used wood that was not treated.

    Also, sometimes garages or additions are stick built and sided with ship lapped log siding that can fool you into thinking it is log construction. Not that that method of construction is a problem, but just something to be aware of.
    When you say "treated", what exactly do you mean? I've built many log homes with untreated logs.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Log Home

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Rotte View Post
    When you say "treated", what exactly do you mean? I've built many log homes with untreated logs.
    Yep, you do not use treated logs.. Treated sill plates, etc but not logs… It is important after the logs are set to seal them with a penetrating stain or other product to help preserve them.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo. area.
    Posts
    276

    Default Re: Log Home

    Without looking at what some of the other guys provided, which is probably very good, the most important thing I know about log homes is to take a good rubber mallet with you, and thump every single log you can reach with it in several places. This is particularly important on the older log homes. You will find that it's quite easy to locate the rotted area of the logs by the difference in sound when you strike them with the mallet. I inspected a 15 year old log home just the day before yesterday, and found five logs with some amount of rot in them. One will need to be completely replaced. I usually find a lot of rotted logs in homes that are 25 years old or older. Exposed log ends at the corners are particularly susceptible to rot if there isn't a lot of roof overhang to protect them, and it is very important that any upward opening cracks be kept well caulked. Logs with twisted grain also seem to be more susceptible to rot problems.


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