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  1. #1
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    Default How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    OK... what to recommend here?

    1) I know that you are not supposed to secure anything to the service entrance conduit, but does this prohibition extend to other conduit at the exterior. Can you cable-tie the AC lines and other low-volt to the conduit to the AC disconnect, for example? To the conduit running from the service disconnect (at the meter cabinet) to a load-side panel, as is done here ?

    Generally, what is the correct sort of "cable management" for low voltage wiring and similar material? If it's not on the conduit, what is the "correct" way to route and secure lo-volt at the exterior on vinyl siding . On masonry? Other than conventional mounting blocks, is anyone aware of a better way to route and secure this stuff?

    2) For the AC lines is there a fastener type that does not over-compress the foam insulation, and which will secure the lines once the foam fails? Generally, what is the "right" way to do this, and where is it documented?

    (Also, I do realize that those are not UV resistant exterior cable ties.)

    Thanks as always.

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    Last edited by Michael Thomas; 01-29-2008 at 06:21 AM.
    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  2. #2
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    That's just a fricken mess. That is about how I would report it, I don't think I would even attempt to tell them what needs to be done. Perhaps some of our brethren might have some suggestions.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    Deal here is, the flipper/GC really is being cooperative in trying to straighten things out for my clients, who are determined to buy this house. But he really is deeply clueless, and the whole HOUSE is a fricken mess. So in addition to my natural curiosity about how to do every little thing in life right, to the extent that can point him in in the right direction with a reasonable amount of effort, it will likely get done right... or at least "better".

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    Michael,

    This is how I would write it up.

    Remove cables & wires stuffed behind electrical service entrance conduit.

    Remove the tie straps supporting the AC lines and replace with approved clamp supports to the building.

    Straighten,unclutter ,cut to the appropriate length all cable,phone, other lines and secure by type using approved attachments secured to the building in an orderly fashion.

    Photo Attached.
    or

    RIP IT ALL OUT for crying out loud.

    Last edited by Billy Stephens; 01-29-2008 at 07:00 PM. Reason: m added to spell clamp removed ed on clutter
    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    No raceway is allowed to be used as a support for other raceways or wiring systems ... except ... control wiring is allowed to be strapped to the raceway containing the power conductors to electrical equipment, such as the low voltage cable is allowed to be strapped to (but not twisted around) the raceway with the power conductors to a condenser unit.

    Raceways are NOT allowed to support other items, including the refrigerant lines, as shown in the photo.

    White cable ties (commonly called zip ties) are not allowed (not rated for nor approved for use for) use outdoors - because they are not UV resistant. Only black cable ties are rated and approved for outdoor use.

    That's a mess, not as bad as it looks (meaning I don't think it will take that much to straighten it out), but it is still a mess.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post

    White cable ties (commonly called zip ties) are not allowed (not rated for nor approved for use for) use outdoors - because they are not UV resistant. Only black cable ties are rated and approved for outdoor use.
    I'm curious why black ties are okay and white ones aren't, and the reason is potential UV damage??? That just doesn't make sense.

    In my area on multi-family buildings with a bank of electric meters/shut-offs I often see thick clear zip-ties on the 'lock' area of the box cover. I've always thought it was a good compromise between a lock and nothing. Kids playing around likely don't have a pair of pliers and the fire department probably does.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    I'm curious why black ties are okay and white ones aren't, and the reason is potential UV damage??? That just doesn't make sense.
    White ones are not UV resistant.

    Black ones are.

    Next time you are in a Big Box store, look at them. You will see that only the black ones say 'Indoor / Outdoor Use' or 'Suitable for Outdoor Use' (wording off packages in my garage).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    If you run across "certain" red cable ty-wraps they are "plenum rated" for such applications in data centers under raised floors and other air movement areas.

    They are also bloody expensive.

    That from my former life of building internet web-hosting data centers.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    White ones are not UV resistant.

    Black ones are.

    Next time you are in a Big Box store, look at them. You will see that only the black ones say 'Indoor / Outdoor Use' or 'Suitable for Outdoor Use' (wording off packages in my garage).

    I wasn't doubting you're correct... it's just odd that something black is okay to be in the sun and something clear isn't.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: How to Secure Lo-volt and AC Lines to Vinyl Siding

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    it's just odd that something black is okay to be in the sun and something clear isn't.
    Carbon black is a great UV protector, and 'black things' typically have a lot of carbon black in them - sometimes just for that purpose.

    White things can be made UV resistant with the addition of certain chemicals, but they are less effective than carbon black.

    Clear things are even more difficult to make UV resistant.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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