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  1. #1
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    Default Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    I recently saw the gas supply shut-off valve for a mid-efficiency furnace inside the furnace cabinet. I was a tight installation. I wrote it up anyway but am looking for some ammo to back up my claim. Any thoughts??

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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    2006 IRC G2420.1.2 Prohibited Locations says shut-off valves are prohibited in concealed locations and G2420.5 says shut-off valves have to be "separate from the appliance".

    Also, can the furnace be changed out without removing the valve, or does the valve not fit through the knock-out in the cabinet?

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Thanks John for your timely response! I don't remember about the size of the knock-out but will keep that in mind for next time. Thanks again.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    2006 IRC G2420.1.2 Prohibited Locations says shut-off valves are prohibited in concealed locations and G2420.5 says shut-off valves have to be "separate from the appliance".

    Also, can the furnace be changed out without removing the valve, or does the valve not fit through the knock-out in the cabinet?
    John: Inside of the appliance cabinet is not a "concealed location":

    CONCEALED LOCATION.
    A location that cannot be accessed without damaging permanent parts of the building structure or finish surface. Spaces above, below or behind readily removable panels or doors shall not be considered as concealed.

    Furhter, read the commentary assigned to 2420.5. The underlining is mine:
    G2420.5 (409.5) Equipment shutoff valve. Each appliance shall be provided with a shutoff valve separate from the appliance. The shutoff valve shall be located in the same room as the
    appliance, not further than 6 feet (1829 mm) from the appliance, and shall be installed upstream from the union, connector or quick disconnect device it serves. Such shutoff valves shall be provided with access.

    Exception: Shutoff valves for vented decorative appliances and decorative appliances for installation in vented fireplaces shall not be prohibited from being installed in an area remote from the appliance where such valves are provided with ready access. Such valves shall be permanently identified and shall serve no other equipment.

    Each appliance, regardless of type, size or location, must have its own dedicated shutoff valve to isolate the appliance from its gas supply. It is not the intent of this section to allow a single shutoff valve to control more than one appliance. Equipment/appliance shutoff valves are not considered to be emergency valves, but rather are considered service valves that allow the appliance to be serviced, repaired, replaced or shut down. See the definition of “Valve, Equipment shutoff.”

    The location requirements of this section are intended to make the valve conspicuous and easy to operate. The code does not require the equipment shutoff valve to be provided with ”ready access.” Because such a valve is not an emergency valve, there is no reason to require ready access, and simply providing access is sufficient. Common practice has been to install the appliance shutoff valve behind ranges and clothes dryers and in the control compartment of decorative gas fireplace appliances. This section allows the practice because the valves are accessible. To avoid the use of an exposed valve or concealed “key-handle” valve, it is accepted practice to locate the shutoff valve for gas fireplace appliances in the control compartment in the bottom of the unit, behind the control access panel (see Commentary Figure G2420.5).

    This section calls for a “separate” shutoff valve, which means a valve other than the valve that is integral with the appliance gas control. The intent is that the separate shutoff be located ahead of all appliance control valves and with no more than 6 feet (1829 mm) of piping between the outlet of the shutoff valve and the inlet of the appliance. This section works with the definition of “piping system” and Section G2413.3 to allow the piping downstream of the shutoff valve to be
    considered and sized as a connector. The code does not state that the required shutoff valve has to be located external to an appliance cabinet, enclosure or housing; therefore, the valve could be located behind an appliance access door/panel.

    The exception allows locating shutoff valves for the stated appliances remote from the appliance if the valves are permanently tagged as to their function, serve only the single appliance and have ready access. The exception allows the shutoff valve to be located anywhere, indoors or outdoors, as long as it is provided with ready access and is permanently identified. In the
    exception, “ready access” is intended because the shutoff valve will be more difficult to locate, being remote from the appliance served. The exception is an alternative to using concealed ”key-handle” type valves located in the wall or floor adjacent to the appliance. The code intends for such valves to be permanently identified by means of a durable tag suitable for the environment,
    such as brass medallions on chains. Unvented appliances are not addressed by the exception.

    The shutoff valve for a log lighter is also the appliance operating valve; therefore, that valve cannot be located remotely. Because the remote shutoff valve allowed by the exception could be any distance [(more than 6 feet) (1829 mm)] from the appliance, the piping from the shutoff valve outlet to within 3 feet (914 mm) of the appliance inlet must be treated and sized as gas piping,
    not as a connector [see exception to Section G2422.1.2.1 and Commentary Figure G2422.1.2.1(2)].



  5. #5
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Pardon the lack of spell check and paragraph formatting on that last post. Not enough caffeine just yet.


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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    John: Inside of the appliance cabinet is not a "concealed location":...
    My bad.

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  7. #7
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    My bad.
    John: Not a problem. I, of course, have never done that sort of thing. Well, at least not this morning . . . yet . . .


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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    Pardon the lack of spell check and paragraph formatting on that last post. Not enough caffeine just yet.
    If by "caffeine" you mean "crack", perfectly understandable.

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Ok, the shut-off can be behind the cabinet cover. But, since one of the main purposes of the shut-off is to facilitate changing out the furnace, you have to be able to remove said furnace without removing the valve, yes? So maybe my question about fitting the valve through the knock-out is more, what's the word, salient?

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    Also, can the furnace be changed out without removing the valve, or does the valve not fit through the knock-out in the cabinet?
    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    The code does not state that the required shutoff valve has to be located external to an appliance cabinet, enclosure or housing; therefore, the valve could be located behind an appliance access door/panel.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    Ok, the shut-off can be behind the cabinet cover. But, since one of the main purposes of the shut-off is to facilitate changing out the furnace, you have to be able to remove said furnace without removing the valve, yes? So maybe my question about fitting the valve through the knock-out is more, what's the word, salient?
    While John did miss on "concealed", he was correct in stating/asking "Also, can the furnace be changed out without removing the valve, or does the valve not fit through the knock-out in the cabinet?".

    There is also another point which needs to be addressed here: Larry said it was a "tight installation", so even if the gas valve could fit through the opening it was through ... does the "tight installation" allow enough room for the appliance to be moved around to allow for its removal from over the gas valve without the removal of the gas valve?

    I can envision a "tight installation" in which that could not happen even if there was a 2 foot diameter hole in the side of the cabinet the gas valve was through. So the critical aspect is 'how tight is "tight"?'.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  11. #11
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Gas supply shut-off valve in furnace cabinet

    So the critical aspect is 'how tight is "tight"?'
    JP: I looked it up in the 2006 IRC. "Tight" is just not there. Could be an acronym for totally inaccessible gas handle there?


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