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  1. #1
    Ron Bishop's Avatar
    Ron Bishop Guest

    Default Mystery blower...

    This blower appears to supply air to a fireplace. I found it in the crawlspace below the fireplace. The house was built in 1910, and the fireplace and chimney appear to be original. Does anybody have an idea why this wwould be necessary, and what it's intended function might be?
    Thks Ron

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    Could be that they are forging iron.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Near Philly, Pa.
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    Smile Re: Mystery blower...

    Nice installation. I see it is "grounded", heh, heh.

    If they have that plastic slinky entering any part of that fireplace, it is at the very least a clearance issue. There is no provision in any codes for powered makeup air, either pro or con. Where does this enter the fireplace- through the ash dump?

    Aside from the professional wiring job, I think it is safe to say this is a DIY job that needs to go away.

    Now, if they felt the need for a fan to feed the fireplace, doesn't that tell you this fireplace was having operational problems? Time to dig deeper (Level II). What other goofy things have they done?
    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  4. #4
    Ron Bishop's Avatar
    Ron Bishop Guest

    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    Great info...thank you kindly, Bob!!


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
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    4,517

    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    I'd take a guess that someone is trying to create some cross ventilation of the crawspace. Was the vent passing through a exterior wall vent opening?

    JMO

    Rick


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    Radon mitigation?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Rockwall Texas
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    4,517

    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    ODOR REMOVER


  8. #8
    Ron Bishop's Avatar
    Ron Bishop Guest

    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    The crawlspace is not ventilated, and that could account for the use of this blower....radon is not common in this area.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
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    1,222

    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    Isn't that called a supercharger in a car? As opposed to the turbocharger, which I think would be on the flue side of the fireplace. I was never much of a mechanic.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Mystery blower...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Robinson View Post
    Isn't that called a supercharger in a car? As opposed to the turbocharger, which I think would be on the flue side of the fireplace. I was never much of a mechanic.
    A supercharger is driven by the engine, taking power from the engine, of course, though, it helps generate much more power than it robs. A supercharger is 'always on' when the engine is running, as soon as the engine is running. Floor a supercharged car and your are off.

    A turbocharger is typically (always?) driven by the exhaust gases, thereby taking much less power from the engine. A turbocharger needs to 'spool up' to speed before it can do any good. Floor a turbocharge car and you are off and gaining as the engine spools up in rpm.

    Both the supercharger and turbocharger has "waste gates" which release excess pressure (boost) so you don't blow the engine apart. Not that a supercharger or turbocharger can 'blow the engine apart' on their pressure, but the extra air they force in also allows/forces in more fuel, which is what makes the engine blow apart if the boost (pressure) is too high - allows too much fuel in.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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