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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    I have a question about a gas fireplace insert that is improperly installed. The manual calls for 23 inches from the top of the insert to the mantle. In gthis case, the mantle is drywall. The clearance is 9 inches. The mantle extends 3 inches over the insert.
    Could the mantle be modified by installing a non combustible material like ceramic tile or does it need to be removed?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    Iím thinking it needs to be removed. The instructions call out 23 inches, and say the shroud should not touch combustibles and it appears to do so. Iím guessing wood behind the sheetrock, which is not good, and sheetrock itself is not considered non-combustible, it is paper faced.

    You would have to dig into the manual or call the manufacturer to see if there are any reduction methods allowed, or at least someone would have to check.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    If the insert is improperly installed then the mantle is irrelevant.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Rock Hill S.C.
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    It says shroud cannot touch combustibles, I don't know that I would consider drywall combustible but since the mantel is partially built over the shroud and there is no way to know for sure how it is built, I would say it needs to be removed. Also drawing shows 23" to the mantel, unless it says 23" to a combustible mantel it would still be wrong.


  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    Drywall is combustible

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    Bob,
    In my neck of the woods, the AHJ says drywall can be used as a thermal barrier:

    "Thermal barriers are used to cover foam plastic. Requirements are found in IBC 2603.4. Exemptions from thermal
    barrier requirements are found in IBC 2603.4.1. The following products are acceptable thermal barriers:
    1. Ĺ inch Gypsum Wallboard, etc."

    Just trying to ascertain the reasoning if the drywall is combustible, does it still give enough protection to be used as a "thermal barrier" just not a non-combustible material?


  7. #7
    Lou Curley's Avatar
    Lou Curley Guest

    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    "Thermal barrier" and "noncombustible" are 2 different things. Noncombustible materials pass ASTM E136, which drywall does not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortensen View Post
    Bob,
    In my neck of the woods, the AHJ says drywall can be used as a thermal barrier:

    "Thermal barriers are used to cover foam plastic. Requirements are found in IBC 2603.4. Exemptions from thermal
    barrier requirements are found in IBC 2603.4.1. The following products are acceptable thermal barriers:
    1. Ĺ inch Gypsum Wallboard, etc."

    Just trying to ascertain the reasoning if the drywall is combustible, does it still give enough protection to be used as a "thermal barrier" just not a non-combustible material?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    I am exploring options for my client. He really likes the mantle and doesn't want raise it up another 14 inches.
    What do you all think of this solution.
    Remove all drywall at the mantle (bottom, front, sides and top) and install 1/2 inch hardie backer or similar and install ceramic tile bedded in thinset. There would still be combustible wood framing behind the tile and backer board.

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  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Memphis TN.
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    Default Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    restating what Chris posted.

    The attachment says Shroud cannot touch combustibles.

    The shown Clearance material is not specified but the Distance is at 23 inches.

    Unless you have some other Manufactures Installation Instructions Nothing is Allow lower than 23 inches.

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  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Cool Re: Gas stove insert clearance to mantle

    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Thompson View Post
    I am exploring options for my client. He really likes the mantle and doesn't want raise it up another 14 inches.
    What do you all think of this solution.
    Remove all drywall at the mantle (bottom, front, sides and top) and install 1/2 inch hardie backer or similar and install ceramic tile bedded in thinset. There would still be combustible wood framing behind the tile and backer board.
    The tile and cementitious backer board will absorb a lot of heat and conduct it to the combustibles. Generally, this is a fire hazard. However, check with the mfr. as sometimes they will state the requirement for "non-combustible" materials but actually allow non-comb. board over combustible framing. Still a bad practice. BTW, metal studs conduct a lot of heat, too.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

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